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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
Steven Fischer of Gambrills has grand plans for the cartoon comedy team he invented a decade ago -- Bluey the blue dog and his human partner with big hair, Steve.They are hosts of a radio show. They perform their comic routine in palaces. The sky is the limit when you're creating an entertainment career on paper.But in real life, to get Steve and Bluey where they are today, Fischer, 24, has put in long hours drawing, writing scripts, recording voices and learning the ins and outs of production.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012
As a public service -- because that's the sort of caring, sharing person I am -- I thought I would offer some appropriate music to help you brace yourself for the plunge off the "fiscal cliff. " (If such a horrid fate is magically avoided at the last minute, this is still worth a listen.) Here is the finale of Alfredo Catalani's "La Wally," an under-appreciated opera from 1892 that just happens to end with an avalanche (don't ask) that sweeps the tenor off an Alpine peak to his death, which upsets the soprano no end, so she, naturally, leaps after him. Perfect fiscal cliff-plunging music, if you ask me. Sorry there's no visual to go with this clip, but the sound effects are good enough to let you know exactly when the fatal denouement arrives for the opera's hapless couple.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman | October 26, 1995
Actor/comedian Michael Winslow performs at Slapstix Comedy Club tonight through Saturday. The comedian, best known for his role as Sgt. Larvelle Jones in the "Police Academy" movies, can produce more than 10,000 sound effects -- everything from Jimi Hendrix playing the guitar to sirens, helicopters and explosions. But Winslow is more than just a sound effects man. His stand-up style is a mixture of wild noises and social commentary. He tends to stay away from racier material and political humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2001
I am an instructor of retirement home residents and need help solving a problem with annoying sounds on their computers. They get an audio "good morning" and "good afternoon" all day when they are using the Internet. Almost every one of those noisy greetings sounds are using files already on one's computer, so the best fix is to find them on the hard drive and destroy them. For example, the America Online software keeps its "welcome" and "you've got mail" sounds along with others in the AOL directory.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1998
Nothing sounds quite like a firecracker, but for radio, the pounding of a rubber mallet on an empty footlocker followed by the rattle of nails in a stainless steel bowl does the trick.Sound effects like those made 1940s radio programs realistic to devotees. This New Year's Eve, Gerald Riley and Karen Lambert will revive the characters, clothes and sounds of the golden age of radio in a new comedy at First Night Annapolis.The Ellicott City-based Wheatfield Theatre Company is one of about 30 local groups that will participate in the arts celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012
As a public service -- because that's the sort of caring, sharing person I am -- I thought I would offer some appropriate music to help you brace yourself for the plunge off the "fiscal cliff. " (If such a horrid fate is magically avoided at the last minute, this is still worth a listen.) Here is the finale of Alfredo Catalani's "La Wally," an under-appreciated opera from 1892 that just happens to end with an avalanche (don't ask) that sweeps the tenor off an Alpine peak to his death, which upsets the soprano no end, so she, naturally, leaps after him. Perfect fiscal cliff-plunging music, if you ask me. Sorry there's no visual to go with this clip, but the sound effects are good enough to let you know exactly when the fatal denouement arrives for the opera's hapless couple.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Staff Writer | April 20, 1992
For a decade, entertainment software authors have struggled with one infernal shortcoming of the original IBM design -- the horrid little speaker and crude sound circuitry designed strictly for beeping and bonking.IBM, Tandy and a few other manufacturers are beginning to add better sound circuits to their personal computers as standard equipment.But if you own an IBM-compatible and want to hear the crack of the bat and the roar of the crowd when you play computer baseball, or hear the scream of your F-16 when you hit the afterburner, you'll have to buy an add-on sound board.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. Himowitz | January 9, 1995
The first computer I bought 12 years ago had a one-voice sound generator that played through the speaker of a TV set. With the right programming, it could give a pretty good rendition of a bad calliope playing the melody of the Star Spangled Banner.A few years later, somebody very smart figured out how to program it to produce four voices simultaneously. The first time I heard it play the William Tell Overture in four-part harmony, I was nearly in tears. I'm sure Rossini would have been, too.For quite a while, that was pretty much the state of the art. As long as computers could produce music and sound effects that had all the charm and presence of a radio alarm clock, nobody paid much attention to the speakers that were attached.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | July 16, 2000
You've seen "The Perfect Storm." Maybe you even read it. But have you heard it? I mean, really listened? The wave-tossed blockbuster has been captivating audiences with its awesome visual effects. With heart-stopping scale, the film shows the massive storm system that ambushed the swordfish boat Andrea Gail and killed its crew of six men off the coast of Massachusetts in 1991. Much has been written about the meticulous detail demanded by director Wolfgang Petersen ("Das Boot," "Air Force One")
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2001
I am an instructor of retirement home residents and need help solving a problem with annoying sounds on their computers. They get an audio "good morning" and "good afternoon" all day when they are using the Internet. Almost every one of those noisy greetings sounds are using files already on one's computer, so the best fix is to find them on the hard drive and destroy them. For example, the America Online software keeps its "welcome" and "you've got mail" sounds along with others in the AOL directory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,Knight Ridder/Tribune | October 16, 2000
Computers are too noisy. They have keyboards that click and squeak, sound cards that beep and squawk, disk drives that rasp and swish, fans that hum and buzz, power supplies that whine and displays that squeal and whistle. If all that doesn't bother you, I probably won't convince you that it's a problem. But if it does bother you, it probably bothers you a lot. I hate it. I think noise pollution is sinister and believe it deserves lots more attention than it gets. I'll bet the indoor noises of the electro-industrial age are a significant factor in our overstressed and quick-to-rage lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | July 16, 2000
You've seen "The Perfect Storm." Maybe you even read it. But have you heard it? I mean, really listened? The wave-tossed blockbuster has been captivating audiences with its awesome visual effects. With heart-stopping scale, the film shows the massive storm system that ambushed the swordfish boat Andrea Gail and killed its crew of six men off the coast of Massachusetts in 1991. Much has been written about the meticulous detail demanded by director Wolfgang Petersen ("Das Boot," "Air Force One")
FEATURES
March 3, 2000
A breezy yet diamond-hard humor runs through "What Planet Are You From?," a bawdy, brainy sex comedy geared toward smart people with a sophomoric streak. At its goofiest and gaggiest, this fish-out-of-water yarn, about a space alien who finds true love while trying to take over the world, will remind viewers of Mel Brooks. At its crudest, it recalls "There's Something About Mary." But at its wisest -- and it is surprisingly wise, in the end -- "What Planet Are You From?" evokes fond memories of director Mike Nichols and his former partner, Elaine May, who together shed a wry, cleansing light on the human condition by way of gently lethal satire.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1998
Nothing sounds quite like a firecracker, but for radio, the pounding of a rubber mallet on an empty footlocker followed by the rattle of nails in a stainless steel bowl does the trick.Sound effects like those made 1940s radio programs realistic to devotees. This New Year's Eve, Gerald Riley and Karen Lambert will revive the characters, clothes and sounds of the golden age of radio in a new comedy at First Night Annapolis.The Ellicott City-based Wheatfield Theatre Company is one of about 30 local groups that will participate in the arts celebration.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
Steven Fischer of Gambrills has grand plans for the cartoon comedy team he invented a decade ago -- Bluey the blue dog and his human partner with big hair, Steve.They are hosts of a radio show. They perform their comic routine in palaces. The sky is the limit when you're creating an entertainment career on paper.But in real life, to get Steve and Bluey where they are today, Fischer, 24, has put in long hours drawing, writing scripts, recording voices and learning the ins and outs of production.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 11, 1996
If the pedal is the soul of the piano, as Rachmaninoff said it was, then Walter Gieseking (1895-1956) was the pianist who raised it to the most ethereal heights.Perhaps because of his early interest in the music of Debussy and Ravel -- which demands kaleidoscopic variety in tonal contrasts -- Gieseking worked incessantly on the pedal until he succeeded in producing sound effects in a range previously unknown.Unlike many other pianists, he did not use the pedal to cover technical shortcomings.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 11, 1996
If the pedal is the soul of the piano, as Rachmaninoff said it was, then Walter Gieseking (1895-1956) was the pianist who raised it to the most ethereal heights.Perhaps because of his early interest in the music of Debussy and Ravel -- which demands kaleidoscopic variety in tonal contrasts -- Gieseking worked incessantly on the pedal until he succeeded in producing sound effects in a range previously unknown.Unlike many other pianists, he did not use the pedal to cover technical shortcomings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,Knight Ridder/Tribune | October 16, 2000
Computers are too noisy. They have keyboards that click and squeak, sound cards that beep and squawk, disk drives that rasp and swish, fans that hum and buzz, power supplies that whine and displays that squeal and whistle. If all that doesn't bother you, I probably won't convince you that it's a problem. But if it does bother you, it probably bothers you a lot. I hate it. I think noise pollution is sinister and believe it deserves lots more attention than it gets. I'll bet the indoor noises of the electro-industrial age are a significant factor in our overstressed and quick-to-rage lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman | October 26, 1995
Actor/comedian Michael Winslow performs at Slapstix Comedy Club tonight through Saturday. The comedian, best known for his role as Sgt. Larvelle Jones in the "Police Academy" movies, can produce more than 10,000 sound effects -- everything from Jimi Hendrix playing the guitar to sirens, helicopters and explosions. But Winslow is more than just a sound effects man. His stand-up style is a mixture of wild noises and social commentary. He tends to stay away from racier material and political humor.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. Himowitz | January 9, 1995
The first computer I bought 12 years ago had a one-voice sound generator that played through the speaker of a TV set. With the right programming, it could give a pretty good rendition of a bad calliope playing the melody of the Star Spangled Banner.A few years later, somebody very smart figured out how to program it to produce four voices simultaneously. The first time I heard it play the William Tell Overture in four-part harmony, I was nearly in tears. I'm sure Rossini would have been, too.For quite a while, that was pretty much the state of the art. As long as computers could produce music and sound effects that had all the charm and presence of a radio alarm clock, nobody paid much attention to the speakers that were attached.
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