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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 8, 1992
Feeling a little down lately? Worried about your job? The fighting in Bosnia? Sister Souljah?Well, perk up! There is good news at hand.The "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" is now going to quote politicians at greater length.There. I knew you'd feel better.Concerned that the average TV sound bite for presidential candidates has shrunk from 42.3 seconds in 1968 to 7.3 seconds today, CBS will now give candidates at least 30 seconds on the air "or they won't be heard at all."And can I see a show of hands as to which you'd prefer?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
There's no time to mince words. Tonight, 16 speakers from different corners of the city's arts and culture scene will discuss a wide range of topics at a bar on North Avenue. The catch? Each one has to cram 20 slides into a five-minute minipresentation. The free event, called Ignite, takes place at the Windup Space in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District. Ignite may be new to Baltimore, but the idea has been around since 2006. Cities from Seattle to Paris have held Ignite events.
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NEWS
By Reps. Wayne T. Gilchrest, Roscoe G. Bartlett and Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 17, 1995
ONE OF THE SAD truisms of contemporary American politics is this: Any policy you can't explain in a 10-second sound bite is a bad policy. This philosophy of government has brought to us many of the difficulties we have today, and it makes it politically risky to address even the most imminent of problems.We were reminded of this during the debate over the proposal to preserve Medicare. The program, which provides for the health care of 37 million elderly and disabled Americans, enjoys near-universal support.
NEWS
By Manya A. Brachear and Manya A. Brachear,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 25, 2008
CHICAGO -- In a rare interview, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. said news media organizations that circulated controversial sound bites of his sermons on the Internet wanted to paint him as "un-American" or "some sort of fanatic" in order to bring down Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama. "I think they wanted to communicate that I am unpatriotic, that I am un-American, that I am filled with hate speech, that I have a cult at Trinity United Church of Christ," Wright told journalist Bill Moyers in the first interview he has granted since comments critical of U.S. policies surfaced on television and the Internet.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | April 6, 1993
The capital's favorite sportIs picking his pick for the CourtAs Bill seeks the bestWith no litmus testExcept it's OK to abort.The Bosnian horror evolvedWhen problems refused to be solved.But we're ready againTo assist the U.N.As long as we don't get involved.While Russia decides who's to rule,It makes our old Red-baiters droolOver new expectationsOf more confrontations --They reckoned the Cold War was cool.A mere 15 smackers a shareHelped Ross purchase NBC air --Not just a sound bite,Town Meeting tonight!
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | January 20, 1998
There may be a few souls out there who are genuinely surprised that ABC tossed Frank Gifford out of the "Monday Night Football" booth for Boomer Esiason, but they would be the same folks who haven't received the memo about the Easter Bunny.Nope, what ABC did to Gifford is what a lot of Americans do when the car they've driven for years or the spouse they've lived with and raised kids with for decades no longer looks attractive: They trade him in for a new model.This sort of thing happens all the time in big business, but especially in sports television.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | February 13, 1991
He may have pretty much spared bankers in view of the night's purpose, but political satirist Mark Russell could hardly be expected to resist another tempting target in his Monday night appearance in Baltimore on behalf of Maryland Public Television.After saying hello to State Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein, who was in the Omni Hotel audience, Russell noted Governor William Donald Schaefer could not be there, "because he's dedicating an outhouse over in Salisbury."Actually, said Russell, Schaefer's recent vulgarity which irritated the Eastern Shore was a long overdue gaffe and could not compare to the material some of Maryland's other recent governors have provided the humor trade.
NEWS
By Ruth Walker | May 1, 1995
NINE POINT eight seconds.That was a very famous number, briefly, a few years ago. Media critic Kiku Adatto determined that the average length of a "sound bite" during the 1988 election campaign had shrunk to 9.8 seconds. The figure often got rounded down -- incorrectly, but understandably -- to a mere nine seconds. In earlier, more innocent times, candidates for office were often allowed to run on for, oh, up to a whole minute. Ms. Adatto's research on this, discussed in a 1990 article in The New Republic, helped focus attention on the incredible shrinking sound bite and nudge the television networks into letting the candidates have a somewhat longer say during the 1992 campaign.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Knight-Ridder News ServiceStaff Writer | October 16, 1992
RICHMOND, Va. -- The voters took over last night in the second presidential debate, and they didn't just ask the questions. They told President Bush, Gov. Bill Clinton and independent candidate Ross Perot that they wanted them to quit slinging mud at each other and get down to discussing the issues that affect their lives.Without entirely abandoning personal comments, the candidates obediently knuckled down to talking about a range of subjects in greater depth than in the first presidential debate in St. Louis or in the vice presidential debate in Atlanta.
NEWS
By Frank Luntz | February 5, 2008
Politics is a battle of inches. An expression here, a sound bite there can often mean the difference between celebration and commiseration. A litany of reasons has been given for Rudolph W. Giuliani's political collapse in this presidential race: He bypassed all the early primary states, showed an almost obsessive focus on 9/11, had dodgy associates and embraced a social policy agenda out of step with mainstream Republicans. True enough, but they ignore a more significant Giuliani campaign failure: the inability or utter unwillingness to communicate a presidential vision of America and the country's future.
NEWS
By Frank Luntz | February 5, 2008
Politics is a battle of inches. An expression here, a sound bite there can often mean the difference between celebration and commiseration. A litany of reasons has been given for Rudolph W. Giuliani's political collapse in this presidential race: He bypassed all the early primary states, showed an almost obsessive focus on 9/11, had dodgy associates and embraced a social policy agenda out of step with mainstream Republicans. True enough, but they ignore a more significant Giuliani campaign failure: the inability or utter unwillingness to communicate a presidential vision of America and the country's future.
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Sun Ideas Editor | June 10, 2007
How well will the next president of the United States lead us? It's a question that carries a certain urgency these days. Only 32 percent of the American people say they approve of the way George W. Bush is doing his job, polls say. Congress doesn't fare much better, and there seem to be daunting problems everywhere -- Iraq, immigration, health care, a new Cold War, a growing gap between rich and poor -- the list goes on and on. There is no shortage of Oval Office candidates.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | March 28, 2007
The catch-22 of American culture is that, no matter how far you go, you can never totally escape it. It is, as rapper Jay-Z once opined, a gift and a curse. Yesterday in the media room, I was sitting next to a very pleasant, very polite Japanese reporter who spoke almost no English. We exchanged a few grunts and hand motions, but for the most part, we were unable to communicate. And then her cell phone rang. I couldn't help but laugh out loud when I realized she had Eminem's "The Real Slim Shady" as her ring tone.
NEWS
By Terence Hagerty | October 28, 2004
AS A YOUNG and enthusiastic voter, I have listened intently to both political parties have told me that for myself and other young voters, this is the most important election in our history. But in my brief term as a politically conscious citizen, it seems that for all the talk of importance, this election has been so poorly covered and inadequately presented by the media that its relevance is veiled by a lack of substance. This election will not be remembered as the passionate struggle between two sharply different plans for America.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Mark Matthews and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 2004
WASHINGTON-Airing some of the most bitter charges of the campaign, Vice President Dick Cheney and Sen. John Edwards at times resorted to exaggeration and oversimplified assertions on a number of complicated issues. Here is a guide to how their statements measure up against the known facts: Cheney said, "We heard Senator Kerry say the other night that there ought to be some kind of global test before U.S. troops are deployed pre- emptively to protect the United States." In fact, Kerry said at the beginning of his first debate with President Bush that he would 'never give a veto to any country over our security.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2004
THE EPICENTER for political excitement last week was the governor's conference room on the second floor of the State House, where city and state officials met repeatedly to discuss a Baltimore schools bail-out plan. While Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. attended only a few minutes of the meetings, Comptroller William Donald Schaefer played an active role, at Ehrlich's request. According to participants in the closed-door sessions, Schaefer used much of his time to prod, goad and belittle Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Emily Leventhal | November 1, 1992
HOLLYWOOD VS. AMERICA:POPULAR CULTURE# AND THE WAR AGAINSTTRADITIONAL VALUES.Michael Medved.HarperCollins.416 pages. $20.7/8 Ever since the first screening of "The Great Train Robbery" in 1903, when unsuspecting viewers fled the theater at the sight of a gun pointed directly at the camera, concerned citizens and public officials have looked at the movies with a skeptical eye. Back then, the most vocal cabal was the Legion of Decency, whose pressure helped...
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 5, 1997
When members of the Baltimore Jewish Council built a $350,000 Holocaust Memorial near the Inner Harbor in 1980, they hoped it would stand for all time as a grim reminder of mankind's capacity for evil.But the memorial turned out to be too grim, in more than one way, and has been replaced by an intentionally more palatable work of architecture that strives to convey a similar message.Starting with a dedication ceremony at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Lombard and Gay streets, visitors will see a redesigned monument that is far less stark and brutal in its imagery, though still infused with symbolism.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
Whoomp, here it is - the latest grating stadium anthem. So, welcome back to the jungle, fellas! Start us up and pump up the jam, 'cause when we get knocked down, we get up again! And we're gonna rock you! That's right, say goodbye to the nah, nah, nah, nahs and the hey, hey, heys - and say hello to "Who Let the Dogs Out." You might have heard it - a few thousand too many times. For the uninitiated, and those unable to make out the words, the Caribbean soul-calypso-junkanoo tune by the Baha Men is about men hitting on women and getting rejected with a chorus of "Who let the dogs out?"
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