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Sound Barriers

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NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | July 29, 1993
Brampton Hills residents who live near a planned extension of Route 100 asked state highway officials last night to install sound barriers before construction begins next month.But State Highway Administration officials said they need at least a month to determine the type of sound barriers that can be used.About 100 residents met with SHA representatives, Howard County and state politicians to learn more about the extension of Route 100 to the U.S. 29 interchange.Construction is scheduled to begin in August on a two-lane expansion of Route 100 that will connect the interchange of U.S. 29 and Route 103 and also hook up with a road being built by developer Patrick McCuan near the Brampton Hills neighborhood in Ellicott City.
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NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2005
LAST WEEK'S column on sound barriers prompted Jack Robinson to wonder whether sound barriers were destined for his neighborhood -- the new Emerson village springing up along Interstate 95, near Route 216. "My wife and I recently moved into our new home in the Emerson community," he said. "Do you know of any plans to add sound barriers on 216 along the east and west sides of the 216 and 95 intersection, and along the stretch of 95 that borders the Emerson community?" I'm not aware of any plans, and without a specific address, State Highway Administration spokesman David Buck could not answer the questions.
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NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
Concerned that rules are not flexible enough, Maryland officials have formed a task force to review, starting tonight, the state's policy on deciding who is eligible for sound barriers that protect homes from highway traffic and construction noise.Since 1987, the state has required exposure to 67 decibels of unwanted noise for a house to qualify for sound barriers. Also, state engineers must determine that the concrete barriers would abate the noise, and that the cost would amount to less than $40,000 for each home.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2005
EDWARD MOORE has been wondering about the sound barrier the state is erecting along U.S. 29 southbound leading to Route 103. "I regularly travel U.S. 29 between U.S. 40 and St. Johns Lane. U.S. 29's noise barrier project seems to have been abandoned, and we have seen little, if any, work performed during the past month or so," he said. "However, the temporary jersey walls have been left in place. These choke the traffic along southbound U.S. 29, and are a hazard to anyone in the right-hand lane.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 23, 1992
Federal, state and Baltimore County officials have agreed on a six-year, $26 million program to erect long-delayed sound barriers along six sections of the Baltimore Beltway.The federal government will pay 80 percent of the costs, with the state and the county chipping in the rest, sources said. The county's share would be roughly $3 million.The money comes from the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, known informally as the "Iced T" bill. It provides money for federal highway projects over the next six years.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
Concerned that rules are not flexible enough, Maryland officials have formed a task force to review, starting tonight, the state's policy on deciding who is eligible for sound barriers that protect homes from highway traffic and construction noise.Since 1987, the state has required exposure to 67 decibels of unwanted noise for a house to qualify for sound barriers. Also, state engineers must determine that the concrete barriers would abate the noise and that the cost would amount to less than $40,000 for each home.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1999
With the approval of local officials, a Howard County builder is offering $270,000 homes so close to a recently opened section of Route 100 that living there "may result in hearing impairment," county land documents warn.County planning officials paved the way for the project along the highway near Ellicott City, granting a noise waiver a year before the road opened. They say it's up to buyers to determine whether they want to live there.State officials say there's no chance sound barriers will be built.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2005
LAST WEEK'S column on sound barriers prompted Jack Robinson to wonder whether sound barriers were destined for his neighborhood -- the new Emerson village springing up along Interstate 95, near Route 216. "My wife and I recently moved into our new home in the Emerson community," he said. "Do you know of any plans to add sound barriers on 216 along the east and west sides of the 216 and 95 intersection, and along the stretch of 95 that borders the Emerson community?" I'm not aware of any plans, and without a specific address, State Highway Administration spokesman David Buck could not answer the questions.
NEWS
By Dilshad D. Husain and Dilshad D. Husain,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 17, 1997
Erecting sound barriers north of the St. Johns Green neighborhood in Ellicott City has been deemed a high-priority project by the Howard County Planning Board after a recent decibel test proved noise from Interstate 70 was beyond the normal limit.Noise levels of as much as 70 decibels were detected in tests taken Jan. 16 and 17. Even that level of noise was not entirely accurate because snow on the ground muffled the sound, a planning board member said at Thursday's meeting.The tests indicated that noise levels peak in the early morning and late afternoon.
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2000
When her neighbors announced a party to celebrate the completion of a concrete barrier against the noise of the Baltimore Beltway, Mamie Rader advised them to hold their horses. Her backyard view hasn't changed in 15 years: a row of evergreen trees and a few dozen yards of distance between her and the cars and trucks whizzing by. When the barrier is completed, though, she will be ready for the party. In the time she has lived on Carrbridge Circle in the Village Green area tucked between Riderwood Elementary School and the Beltway, Rader says, "I've used my back yard once.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 4, 2003
IN THE ORNATE City Hall chambers where a packed crowd gathered yesterday evening to hear Martin O'Malley's annual State of the City speech, the mayor of Baltimore got about 14 words into his formal address when an audio man, crawling along the floor at O'Malley's feet, started fiddling with microphone wires and plugs. The mayor, somewhere between thanking his City Council and rallying the troops for the tough year ahead, paused and looked down. A Kennedyesque "ask not what your country can do for you" moment, this was not. "You messing with my sound?"
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2000
When her neighbors announced a party to celebrate the completion of a concrete barrier against the noise of the Baltimore Beltway, Mamie Rader advised them to hold their horses. Her backyard view hasn't changed in 15 years: a row of evergreen trees and a few dozen yards of distance between her and the cars and trucks whizzing by. When the barrier is completed, though, she will be ready for the party. In the time she has lived on Carrbridge Circle in the Village Green area tucked between Riderwood Elementary School and the Beltway, Rader says, "I've used my back yard once.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2000
With the County Council scheduled to vote on next year's budget in less than two days, a handful of projects are emerging as possible additions to County Executive Janet S. Owens' proposed $1 billion spending plan. The list includes a new library in Crofton, sound barriers on U.S. 50 near Annapolis and expedited repairs to Marley Middle School, said Council Chairman Daniel E. Klosterman Jr. During the next two days, he and other council members will look for ways to free money to pay for projects they want added.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1999
This is a story of determination and dirt -- 100,000 cubic yards of it.It begins more than two years ago in a neighborhood alongside Route 32 in Columbia's River Hill village, where Karen Bellamy has a house that is satisfyingly suburban in every way except one: She can hear the constant rumble of speeding cars and 18-wheeler trucks on the four-lane highway just across Morning Time Lane.When the State Highway Administration said it wasn't responsible -- and wouldn't pay for sound walls or dirt for an earth berm to help mitigate the noise -- Bellamy decided to take the matter up herself.
NEWS
By From staff reports | April 28, 1999
In Baltimore CityN.J. congressman asks FAA to refuse baseball air banA Cuban-American congressman is asking the federal government to deny a request by Major League Baseball and keep the skies over Camden Yards open during Monday's Orioles game with Cuba.Baseball asked the Federal Aviation Administration and Secret Service to consider restricting airspace over the stadium after a failed attempt by a Miami-based pilot to drop leaflets during the game in Havana. The pilot has said he has no plans to try here.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1999
With the approval of local officials, a Howard County builder is offering $270,000 homes so close to a recently opened section of Route 100 that living there "may result in hearing impairment," county land documents warn.County planning officials paved the way for the project along the highway near Ellicott City, granting a noise waiver a year before the road opened. They say it's up to buyers to determine whether they want to live there.State officials say there's no chance sound barriers will be built.
NEWS
June 29, 1998
LAST WEEK, Intrepid released the results of an unscientific survey of commuters' opinions on aesthetics of the new sound barriers that line portions of Interstate 695.To sum it up, nearly all drivers found them distasteful.Frank F. Braunstein lives behind the walls and wrote your wheelster a lengthy description of barrier life."I feel like I'm in prison," says Braunstein, who has lived in the Stevenson Village Condominium complex in Pikesville for 15 years. "It cuts down on circulation. If we have a snow, it'll lay there, because there's no breeze coming through.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1998
The 18-wheelers shake the walls of Ron Bowers' house as they roar north on Interstate 83 near Lutherville. "There is a tremendous racket," said Bowers, president of Longford North Improvement Association.But the State Highway Administration steadfastly refuses to build sound barriers in Bowers' Baltimore County neighborhood -- or any other built after the roads were constructed.The policy has local officials throughout the state scrambling to protect future homeowners from highway noise, at a time when builders are clamoring for attractive land that happens to lie close to major roadways.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
It's 5: 15 p.m. on a Tuesday at the Coyle residence in Columbia, and Dad has just driven up to the family's home on an ordinary cul-de-sac on Mellow Wine Way.Already, the salad has been served. The grandparents, in from rural Pennsylvania for a visit, shuttle the children to the dining room table, as the dog, Jake, looks for handouts before retreating to the kitchen.It's the perfect picture of quiet suburban life in James W. Rouse's 31-year-old planned community.Except, that is, for the sound of the cars and trucks -- including 18-wheelers -- barreling past the Coyles' back yard on Route 32. During the morning and afternoon rush hours, when the windows and back door are open, traffic makes it hard to hear the doorbell or the family room TV.In upscale River Hill, Columbia's newest village, residents have complained for years about the constant rumble of traffic from the four-lane highway that splits their community.
FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH AND PATRICIA MEISOL and LINELL SMITH AND PATRICIA MEISOL,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1998
Monica, Monica. America has fretted, dieted and shopped with this girl. We're saturated with visions of her beret, her perfect teeth, her cascade of hair. And we've heard all the intimate details of her inappropriate relationship.We've heard it all.Actually, we haven't.We -- many of us, anyway -- have not yet heard Monica's voice. Not so much as a "No comment." And how can we possibly know her without hearing her?When we finally hear it, will Monica's voice have the girlish, uptalk rhythms and flavors we associate with pampered Beverly Hills twentysomethings?
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