Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSoul Train
IN THE NEWS

Soul Train

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
At the height of its popularity, "Soul Train" felt like a religion in Baltimore. The Saturday daytime show hosted by the late Don Cornelius was not to be missed - like church or the early seasons of "Saturday Night Live," according to Tim Watts, a longtime Baltimore disc jockey. "It was like 'SNL' with John Belushi, where everyone had to go home to watch TV Saturday nights," Watts said. "On Saturday mornings, people in Baltimore would clean the house and put 'Soul Train' on. It was the soundtrack of our youth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Some show up with pie or casserole, but Baltimore writer Ericka Blount Danois was told to bring her recently purchased "Best of Soul Train" DVDs to her family's Thanksgiving dinner in 2009. When Todd Steven Burroughs, her Morgan State University teaching colleague at the time, also pressed to borrow the DVDs, Danois realized the influential variety show from the '70s still deeply resonated with her generation. Then the wheels began to turn. "There weren't that many shows that showcased black culture in the way 'Soul Train' did, so it was a very big deal for us," said Danois, 42, who lives next to Belvedere Square.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Gary Graff and Gary Graff,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 9, 1993
While the syndicated Soul Train Music Awards don't enjoy the popularity of the Grammys or the American Music Awards, this year they share a major attraction: Michael Jackson.Mr. Jackson's appearance at tonight's ceremony in Los Angeles -- he'll perform his hit "Remember the Time" -- is the latest stop in a publicity blitz that's included the other major music awards shows, the Super Bowl and his top-rated TV interview with Oprah Winfrey.But no matter what it does for Mr. Jackson, who is also receiving a Humanitarian of the Year award, his performance shines a welcome seventh-year spotlight on "Soul Train's" awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
At the height of its popularity, "Soul Train" felt like a religion in Baltimore. The Saturday daytime show hosted by the late Don Cornelius was not to be missed - like church or the early seasons of "Saturday Night Live," according to Tim Watts, a longtime Baltimore disc jockey. "It was like 'SNL' with John Belushi, where everyone had to go home to watch TV Saturday nights," Watts said. "On Saturday mornings, people in Baltimore would clean the house and put 'Soul Train' on. It was the soundtrack of our youth.
FEATURES
By Andy Meisler and Andy Meisler,New York Times News Service | August 8, 1995
For the better part of three decades, Don Cornelius has straddled the worlds of popular music and broadcasting. During that time, both businesses have changed almost beyond recognition.In response, Mr. Cornelius, the creator, executive producer and former host of the syndicated television program "Soul Train," has changed course very little. He has clung steadfastly to his niche audience, and in return much of that audience has remained loyal. The heaviest concentration of "Soul Train" viewers is in urban markets with large black communities, like Baltimore, New York and Charleston, S.C.Many less-than-with-it baby boomers have mistakenly consigned "Soul Train" to the Afro- and platform shoe-friendly 1970s, but -- surprise -- the series is about to enter its 25th season, making it the longest-lasting program in first-run syndication.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 15, 2001
Shemar Moore can barely keep track of what day it is, much less what city he's in. Wait. It must be Friday because he's just flown in on the red-eye from Los Angeles, where he wrapped up another week on "The Young and the Restless." He happens to be in Philadelphia, but as of tomorrow, he'll be in Baltimore for the return engagement of the stage play "The Fabric of a Man" at the Lyric Opera House. "I'm doing so many things right now you'd swear I had three or four of me, which I wish I did have because sleep is a hard thing to find in my life," Moore says after delaying an interview for several hours in an effort to catch up on some of that elusive sleep.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Some show up with pie or casserole, but Baltimore writer Ericka Blount Danois was told to bring her recently purchased "Best of Soul Train" DVDs to her family's Thanksgiving dinner in 2009. When Todd Steven Burroughs, her Morgan State University teaching colleague at the time, also pressed to borrow the DVDs, Danois realized the influential variety show from the '70s still deeply resonated with her generation. Then the wheels began to turn. "There weren't that many shows that showcased black culture in the way 'Soul Train' did, so it was a very big deal for us," said Danois, 42, who lives next to Belvedere Square.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 11, 1994
SUPERUNKNOWNSoundgarden (A&M 31454 0198)Forget those arguments over whether Nirvana or Pearl Jam rules the Seattle rock world. Frankly, no band better typifies the adventurous aggression of that scene better than Soundgarden, and if you need proof, look no further than "Superunknown." Like the band's previous work, this album has more than its share of sonic crunch, from the hypnotic riffage of "Let Me Drown" to the full-throttle roar of "Kickstand." But that's hardly the limit of this band's imagination.
NEWS
March 11, 1992
To the top Natalie Cole's musical tribute to her late father, Nat "King" Cole, continues to rack up awards.Her album "Unforgettable" won two honors at last night's sixth annual Soul Train Music Awards, a celebration of black-oriented music.Miss Cole was this year's top Grammy winner and won American Music and NAACP Image awards. To those she added Soul Train trophies for best rhythm and blues-soul album of the year for a female artist and best jazz album.Newcomers Color Me Badd picked up trophies for R&B song of the year and best single by a group, band or duo for their song "I Wanna Sex You Up."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1995
Days like this could turn couch potato into an honorable profession. Start it off with a classic of the silent cinema, end it with one of the best musicals ever made, throw some Beatles and soul music into the mix, and you've got the makings for TV nirvana.* "The World's Greatest Magic II" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- I suppose if you like this sort of stuff. But you can do so much better tonight. NBC.* "The Beatles Anthology, Part 2" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The boys enter their most fertile period.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - I'll be honest. I have trouble seeing Robert Kelly as a victim. The singer, professionally known as R. Kelly, stands accused by Chicago authorities of child pornography, the chief evidence of which is a videotape that allegedly shows him having sex with an underage girl. Similar charges in Florida were tossed last month on a technicality. So, while Mr. Kelly is certainly entitled to the legal presumption of innocence, he hardly seems like a fellow who should be greeted with trophies and applause.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 15, 2001
Shemar Moore can barely keep track of what day it is, much less what city he's in. Wait. It must be Friday because he's just flown in on the red-eye from Los Angeles, where he wrapped up another week on "The Young and the Restless." He happens to be in Philadelphia, but as of tomorrow, he'll be in Baltimore for the return engagement of the stage play "The Fabric of a Man" at the Lyric Opera House. "I'm doing so many things right now you'd swear I had three or four of me, which I wish I did have because sleep is a hard thing to find in my life," Moore says after delaying an interview for several hours in an effort to catch up on some of that elusive sleep.
SPORTS
By JOHN POWERS and JOHN POWERS,BOSTON GLOBE | September 22, 1998
It wasn't so much the gold medals, which she won in triplicate. It wasn't so much the times, which some people found literally unbelievable. It was the style -- racy and edgy and undeniably glam.Florence Griffith Joyner, who died of an apparent heart seizure yesterday at 38, was a race car done up in Day-Glo, a sprinter who stopped the show merely by spreading her polished six-inch nails on the starting line.FloJo was fluorescent. She turned up for the world championships in a clingy bodysuit that might have been borrowed from the Cat Woman's closet.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1995
Days like this could turn couch potato into an honorable profession. Start it off with a classic of the silent cinema, end it with one of the best musicals ever made, throw some Beatles and soul music into the mix, and you've got the makings for TV nirvana.* "The World's Greatest Magic II" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- I suppose if you like this sort of stuff. But you can do so much better tonight. NBC.* "The Beatles Anthology, Part 2" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The boys enter their most fertile period.
FEATURES
By Andy Meisler and Andy Meisler,New York Times News Service | August 8, 1995
For the better part of three decades, Don Cornelius has straddled the worlds of popular music and broadcasting. During that time, both businesses have changed almost beyond recognition.In response, Mr. Cornelius, the creator, executive producer and former host of the syndicated television program "Soul Train," has changed course very little. He has clung steadfastly to his niche audience, and in return much of that audience has remained loyal. The heaviest concentration of "Soul Train" viewers is in urban markets with large black communities, like Baltimore, New York and Charleston, S.C.Many less-than-with-it baby boomers have mistakenly consigned "Soul Train" to the Afro- and platform shoe-friendly 1970s, but -- surprise -- the series is about to enter its 25th season, making it the longest-lasting program in first-run syndication.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 11, 1994
SUPERUNKNOWNSoundgarden (A&M 31454 0198)Forget those arguments over whether Nirvana or Pearl Jam rules the Seattle rock world. Frankly, no band better typifies the adventurous aggression of that scene better than Soundgarden, and if you need proof, look no further than "Superunknown." Like the band's previous work, this album has more than its share of sonic crunch, from the hypnotic riffage of "Let Me Drown" to the full-throttle roar of "Kickstand." But that's hardly the limit of this band's imagination.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - I'll be honest. I have trouble seeing Robert Kelly as a victim. The singer, professionally known as R. Kelly, stands accused by Chicago authorities of child pornography, the chief evidence of which is a videotape that allegedly shows him having sex with an underage girl. Similar charges in Florida were tossed last month on a technicality. So, while Mr. Kelly is certainly entitled to the legal presumption of innocence, he hardly seems like a fellow who should be greeted with trophies and applause.
SPORTS
By JOHN POWERS and JOHN POWERS,BOSTON GLOBE | September 22, 1998
It wasn't so much the gold medals, which she won in triplicate. It wasn't so much the times, which some people found literally unbelievable. It was the style -- racy and edgy and undeniably glam.Florence Griffith Joyner, who died of an apparent heart seizure yesterday at 38, was a race car done up in Day-Glo, a sprinter who stopped the show merely by spreading her polished six-inch nails on the starting line.FloJo was fluorescent. She turned up for the world championships in a clingy bodysuit that might have been borrowed from the Cat Woman's closet.
FEATURES
By Gary Graff and Gary Graff,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 9, 1993
While the syndicated Soul Train Music Awards don't enjoy the popularity of the Grammys or the American Music Awards, this year they share a major attraction: Michael Jackson.Mr. Jackson's appearance at tonight's ceremony in Los Angeles -- he'll perform his hit "Remember the Time" -- is the latest stop in a publicity blitz that's included the other major music awards shows, the Super Bowl and his top-rated TV interview with Oprah Winfrey.But no matter what it does for Mr. Jackson, who is also receiving a Humanitarian of the Year award, his performance shines a welcome seventh-year spotlight on "Soul Train's" awards.
NEWS
March 11, 1992
To the top Natalie Cole's musical tribute to her late father, Nat "King" Cole, continues to rack up awards.Her album "Unforgettable" won two honors at last night's sixth annual Soul Train Music Awards, a celebration of black-oriented music.Miss Cole was this year's top Grammy winner and won American Music and NAACP Image awards. To those she added Soul Train trophies for best rhythm and blues-soul album of the year for a female artist and best jazz album.Newcomers Color Me Badd picked up trophies for R&B song of the year and best single by a group, band or duo for their song "I Wanna Sex You Up."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.