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By Jason Hammersla and Jason Hammersla,HARTFORD COURANT | January 15, 2004
Two questions: Who is Joss Stone, and who does she think she is? The first is easier to answer. A 16-year-old ingenue from Devon, England, Stone is the latest rootsy blond songbird with a debut CD. And if The Soul Sessions is any indication, she thinks she is the voice of American soul music for a new generation. The scary thing is, she may be right. The album, which began as a side project to Stone's yet-unreleased mainstream debut, is a delicious platter of long-lost R&B cuts, fusing old-school soul sensibilities with contemporary production techniques.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Last year, after Sharon Jones' third round of chemotherapy to treat stage-two pancreatic cancer, the 58-year-old soul singer cried as she decided to cut off her remaining hair, which was “hanging onto strings in little braids.” Moments later, the frontwoman of the Brooklyn, N.Y.-based group Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings found humor and strength in her new hairstyle. She even seemed to like it. “When I looked in that mirror, I was like, 'Oh! My head is pretty round. I got a nice pretty round head.
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EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | July 3, 2012
For those who enjoy listening to R&B, jazz, gospel and other music recorded mainly by African-American musicians, being able to find it in numerous places along the radio dial is something we take for granted these days. Some of my young nieces and nephews find it hard to believe that in the early years of radio, most white station owners banned R&B recordings, or race records as they called them, on the airwaves. Although the ban had been lifted in some cities by the late 1950s, when I was growing up in The South in the 1960s, we still only heard one or two songs by African-American artists played on my local radio station, WCKM, in Winnsboro, S.C. We went to nearby Columbia several times a week where we could hear R&B on a black-owned station there, but its signal didn't reach my hometown after sundown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Maysa Leak had always heard music in her head. But when the 46-year-old soul singer from Gwynn Oak lost her mother to Leukemia last summer, the music stopped. For the first time she could ever recall, the artist simply known as Maysa heard nothing. "I couldn't even hear melodies," Maysa said recently. "It was so strange. " Normally, Maysa - a Morgan State alumna who got her start singing backup to Stevie Wonder and later became the featured singer of the jazz-fusion group Incognito - used music to get through tough patches.
TRAVEL
August 19, 2007
WHERE TO GO Fun in Folly Beach FOLLY BEACH, S.C. / / You don't come here for golf. The nearest links are across the causeways, on the mainland. If you're looking for tennis or spa resorts, you'd do better to head to Kiawah, the next island south. Fancy food? Nothing here tops what you'll find in Charleston. But Folly Beach is where Charlestonians come to kick back and enjoy a beach experience less hectic than Myrtle. Area residents sometimes say it's more like Key West, Fla. They may be right.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | August 10, 1993
Before I started to write this account of my interview last week with soul singer James Brown, I penned a note to myself: "Don't blow this!"So naturally I froze, like a grade-schooler stricken with stage fright, like a tongue-tied young lover, like a -- well, like a journalist besieged by writer's block.Here's the problem: James Brown used to call himself "The Godfather of Soul, Sooooul Brother Number One." And he was. But over the years I've read retrospectives and critiques of Mr. Brown and his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
Note: Due to weather, this year's Silopanna Music Festival has been canceled. Judging by the charts in recent years, it seems as though America has rediscovered soul and funk. Cee Lo Green, Janelle Monae, Bruno Mars — even Grace Potter and Fitz and the Tantrums — have found mainstream success with music inspired, occasionally lifted from and mostly in debt to the sounds that dominated the '60s and early '70s. To Sharon Jones, the indefatigable lead singer of the Dap-Kings, it just seems like the world has caught up with her and her band.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Last year, after Sharon Jones' third round of chemotherapy to treat stage-two pancreatic cancer, the 58-year-old soul singer cried as she decided to cut off her remaining hair, which was “hanging onto strings in little braids.” Moments later, the frontwoman of the Brooklyn, N.Y.-based group Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings found humor and strength in her new hairstyle. She even seemed to like it. “When I looked in that mirror, I was like, 'Oh! My head is pretty round. I got a nice pretty round head.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1995
Days like this could turn couch potato into an honorable profession. Start it off with a classic of the silent cinema, end it with one of the best musicals ever made, throw some Beatles and soul music into the mix, and you've got the makings for TV nirvana.* "The World's Greatest Magic II" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- I suppose if you like this sort of stuff. But you can do so much better tonight. NBC.* "The Beatles Anthology, Part 2" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The boys enter their most fertile period.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 12, 2007
Soul music has always moved Taylor Hicks. It offered comfort at age 8 when his parents divorced and later informed his musical approach. "Anybody from the South -- they know about soul," says the Alabama native, who plays sold-out shows at Rams Head Live on Tuesday night and the Birchmere on Sunday and Monday. "My musical root was Ray Charles, and it grew from there. When I heard him -- I think it was the Modern Sounds in Country and Western album when I was 8 -- I caught the bug. It was over from there."
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | July 3, 2012
For those who enjoy listening to R&B, jazz, gospel and other music recorded mainly by African-American musicians, being able to find it in numerous places along the radio dial is something we take for granted these days. Some of my young nieces and nephews find it hard to believe that in the early years of radio, most white station owners banned R&B recordings, or race records as they called them, on the airwaves. Although the ban had been lifted in some cities by the late 1950s, when I was growing up in The South in the 1960s, we still only heard one or two songs by African-American artists played on my local radio station, WCKM, in Winnsboro, S.C. We went to nearby Columbia several times a week where we could hear R&B on a black-owned station there, but its signal didn't reach my hometown after sundown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
Note: Due to weather, this year's Silopanna Music Festival has been canceled. Judging by the charts in recent years, it seems as though America has rediscovered soul and funk. Cee Lo Green, Janelle Monae, Bruno Mars — even Grace Potter and Fitz and the Tantrums — have found mainstream success with music inspired, occasionally lifted from and mostly in debt to the sounds that dominated the '60s and early '70s. To Sharon Jones, the indefatigable lead singer of the Dap-Kings, it just seems like the world has caught up with her and her band.
TRAVEL
August 19, 2007
WHERE TO GO Fun in Folly Beach FOLLY BEACH, S.C. / / You don't come here for golf. The nearest links are across the causeways, on the mainland. If you're looking for tennis or spa resorts, you'd do better to head to Kiawah, the next island south. Fancy food? Nothing here tops what you'll find in Charleston. But Folly Beach is where Charlestonians come to kick back and enjoy a beach experience less hectic than Myrtle. Area residents sometimes say it's more like Key West, Fla. They may be right.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 12, 2007
Soul music has always moved Taylor Hicks. It offered comfort at age 8 when his parents divorced and later informed his musical approach. "Anybody from the South -- they know about soul," says the Alabama native, who plays sold-out shows at Rams Head Live on Tuesday night and the Birchmere on Sunday and Monday. "My musical root was Ray Charles, and it grew from there. When I heard him -- I think it was the Modern Sounds in Country and Western album when I was 8 -- I caught the bug. It was over from there."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 2005
It doesn't take much to get Al Green - the Rev. Al Green, that is - up on his pulpit. Especially when the subject is love. The most acclaimed soul singer since Ray Charles has seen love, experienced it and sung about it from many perspectives: as an R&B sex symbol in the 1970s, as a reborn gospel singer and preacher in the '80s and '90s, and lately as a man who has struck a balance between the secular and the spiritual. When Green decided last year to reunite with his longtime songwriting partner and producer Willie Mitchell - with whom he created some of the most enticing, sensual soul records ever in Let's Stay Together, Tired of Being Alone and You Ought to Be With Me - his first stop was his mother's house.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | November 25, 2004
I'VE ADMIRED Gerald Levert for a long time. He is, without a doubt, the most stirring soul singer of his generation. Takes after his pops, the underrated Eddie Levert of the O'Jays. But beyond the grits-and-grease histrionics and classic hits, beyond the forcibly magnetic showmanship, there's the brotha's elegantly understated style. He sure knows how to dress. The tailored pastel suits, flowing shirts, fine shoes, slacks with creases sharp enough to cut a ham -- Gerald's look is always so fresh and so clean.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 27, 1992
"Queen of Soul."That pretty much says it all, doesn't it? No matter how many pretenders have laid claim to the throne over the last 25 years, everybody with ears knows that soul music has only had one queen ever, and her name is Aretha Franklin.It isn't just a matter of hits, though Lord knows she's had her share and then some. Since 1967, when "I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Loved You)" rocketed into the Top 10, Aretha has put some 36 singles into the pop Top 40, including such epochal works as "(You Make Me Feel Like)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 20, 1992
Has there ever been a pop music movement as well-publicized yet utterly mysterious as the techno craze?By now, almost everyone who has ever picked up a People magazine has heard about techno music and raves -- those all-night parties featuring frenzied dancing, deafening music, "smart" drinks and funny fashions. Indeed, raves have prompted a few news reports in addition to the trend pieces, thanks to the illicit drugs (MDMA, or "ecstasy," is the best known, but ketamine, or "special K," is gaining popularity among English ravers)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 30, 2004
Something alchemic occurred Thursday night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. Yuri Temirkanov took standard works of the Russian repertoire, poured them into his St. Petersburg Philharmonic, stirred them with his unself-conscious ideas about the nature of music-making, and created sonic gold. More than that, he generated the kind of emotional communication that grabs you and doesn't easily let go. I was still reliving moments of that concert the next day, and expect to be doing so for a long time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jason Hammersla and Jason Hammersla,HARTFORD COURANT | January 15, 2004
Two questions: Who is Joss Stone, and who does she think she is? The first is easier to answer. A 16-year-old ingenue from Devon, England, Stone is the latest rootsy blond songbird with a debut CD. And if The Soul Sessions is any indication, she thinks she is the voice of American soul music for a new generation. The scary thing is, she may be right. The album, which began as a side project to Stone's yet-unreleased mainstream debut, is a delicious platter of long-lost R&B cuts, fusing old-school soul sensibilities with contemporary production techniques.
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