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By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
On a crisp spring morning, chef David Thomas stands in the kitchen of his Parkville cafe, Herb & Soul, prepping for a busy day of cooking. Plastic tubs overflow with fresh kale, while shelves hold spices that will impart flavor to the chef's Old Bay Fried Chicken, mac and cheese, and smoked chili-rubbed boneless short ribs with homemade sauce. At first blush, the menu might bring to mind soul food, although Thomas describes his farm-to-table, sustainable fare as Southern fusion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
On a crisp spring morning, chef David Thomas stands in the kitchen of his Parkville cafe, Herb & Soul, prepping for a busy day of cooking. Plastic tubs overflow with fresh kale, while shelves hold spices that will impart flavor to the chef's Old Bay Fried Chicken, mac and cheese, and smoked chili-rubbed boneless short ribs with homemade sauce. At first blush, the menu might bring to mind soul food, although Thomas describes his farm-to-table, sustainable fare as Southern fusion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Herb & Soul began last September as a catering and carryout operation in the back part of a Parkville convenience store. The offerings included interesting Southern cuisine and soul food but also typical carryout items like cheese steaks and wings. The owners - Brandon Taylor, Yuriy Chernov and David Thomas, the executive chef - were encouraged enough by the neighborhood's response to think about expanding or even moving. They at one point considered a property in the Hollins Market neighborhood.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Darker Than Blue , Casey Jenkins' white-tablecloth soul-food cafe on Greenmount Avenue, will close at the end of October. The restaurant's last day is Oct. 31, according to Jenkins. "We've been able to outgrow our current location," Jenkins said of his Waverly spot. "We had always been looking for ways to expand. " Jenkins said he is in negotiations to relocate Darker Than Blue to the mixed-use retail and residential complex being developed in the 3200 block of St. Paul St. in Charles Village.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Granny's Restaurant may be right next to the food court in Owings Mills Mall, but it's far from your typical mall food. Soul food is Granny's specialty — served with a smile. Named after Chef Valerie Dorsey's 106-year-old grandmother, Granny's moved from its old home down the street to a space three times bigger at the mall. Granny's has been at its new digs for eight months now, and its staff is beginning to feel at home. While the owners have done some renovation, the ghost of the previous tenant, a Chinese restaurant, still haunts the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 8, 2000
Soulful suppers It's a whole new definition of soul food. Heaven's Gate Eatery at 1825 N. Smallwood St. in West Baltimore is run mostly by members of the Hebron Memorial Church of God and Christ, with the motto "Food for the Body & Soul." The cafeteria is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner every day but Sunday. You can get dinners such as fried chicken, ribs, pigs feet and meatloaf with gravy, and side orders such as hush puppies, black-eyed peas and candied sweets. But don't think everything is soulful.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1998
Micah's is a soul-food restaurant with a split personality -- part cafeteria, part banquet hall. If you don't mind carrying your own food on a plastic tray to the dining room, Micah's is a good choice for a hearty, comforting meal of lake trout, ribs or smothered pork chops.We entered the bright cafeteria on a recent weekday night, and got on line to survey the evening's choices. Most people were having their dinners boxed up for carryout, but a few, like us, were planning to eat in the dining room.
FEATURES
By Brian McTavish and Brian McTavish,KANSAS CITY STAR | September 29, 1997
"Raisin in the Sun" meets "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" with a '90s sizzle in "Soul Food," writer/director George Tillman Jr.'s emotionally honest portrayal of an extended African-American family's struggle to stick together.For 40 years a Chicago family has gathered for Sunday afternoon dinner. Dish upon dish of delicious soul food is lovingly prepared by widowed family matriarch Big Mama Joe, who dispenses we-will-survive axioms to her three daughters and their families like so many servings of corn bread.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | June 3, 2007
As a cuisine connoisseur -- with a specialty in soul food -- one of the most exciting things about moving to a new city is all of the restaurants to be discovered. A few years ago, I moved from New Orleans to Baltimore with high expectations. With a similar African-American population, surely Charm City would offer a bevy of eateries with foods founded by its largest ethnic group -- perfectly seasoned fried chicken, oh-so-tender collard greens, or sugary-sweet honey butter cornbread. While Baltimore does not have the equivalent of a marquee soul food restaurant like Washington's B. Smith's, New York's Sylvia's or New Orleans' Dooky Chase, it does have several offerings near the downtown area that satisfy the craving.
FEATURES
By Frances Grandy Taylor and Frances Grandy Taylor,Hartford Courant | July 21, 1993
As a boy, Wiley Mullins spent his time watching his mother cook in their home in Tuscumbia, Ala. Her specialties were staples of the African-American soul-food tradition: dirty rice, collards and turnip greens, fried chicken and catfish, black-eyed peas and butter beans.At home in his kitchen in Bridgeport, Conn., Mr. Mullins whips up his own version of dirty rice: browned ground hamburger, white rice and about a half cup of seasoning with water added. In a matter of minutes, a steaming plate of spicy rice is ready to enjoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Herb & Soul began last September as a catering and carryout operation in the back part of a Parkville convenience store. The offerings included interesting Southern cuisine and soul food but also typical carryout items like cheese steaks and wings. The owners - Brandon Taylor, Yuriy Chernov and David Thomas, the executive chef - were encouraged enough by the neighborhood's response to think about expanding or even moving. They at one point considered a property in the Hollins Market neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Granny's Restaurant may be right next to the food court in Owings Mills Mall, but it's far from your typical mall food. Soul food is Granny's specialty — served with a smile. Named after Chef Valerie Dorsey's 106-year-old grandmother, Granny's moved from its old home down the street to a space three times bigger at the mall. Granny's has been at its new digs for eight months now, and its staff is beginning to feel at home. While the owners have done some renovation, the ghost of the previous tenant, a Chinese restaurant, still haunts the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
Sharp and svelte but also funny, Nicole Ari Parker typically hits the screen as put-together characters like Eddie Murphy's ex-wife in "Imagine This. " So she leapt at the chance to play Zenobia, the comically confused sportscaster heroine of "35 and Ticking. " Parker was born in Washington and raised in Baltimore from age 2. She also lived for six years as an adult in Atlanta. "35 and Ticking" opens Friday in Atlanta, D.C., and in Baltimore at the AMC Owings Mills and the AMC Security Square.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large | October 14, 2009
Ronnie Brooks, Yanna Foster and Victoria Coleman make up the gospel group Immeasurable. As of last week, they are also the owners of a new soul food restaurant, Immeasurable Chicken & Waffle (1700 W. Pratt St., 888-801-2863). I asked the group's assistant, Michelle Guess, why a gospel group would open a restaurant. "They wanted a place the community could have a good, nonalcoholic time," she said. "They wanted to bring back something positive to Baltimore." Chicken and waffles are a good place to start, but the menu doesn't stop there.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 12, 2009
In just a handful of scenes as Eddie Murphy's ex-wife in Imagine That, Baltimore-bred Nicole Ari Parker creates a woman who sums up the aspirations of every parent in the movie. She's a caring mother who balances her inner child with her essential adult. She doesn't hesitate to leave her fantasy-prone daughter (Yara Shahidi) in the care of her workaholic husband. When he fails her daughter, Parker's character picks up the pieces without freezing him out. Imagine That is a kids' movie that focuses on motherhood and fatherhood.
NEWS
By Ericka Blount Danois and Ericka Blount Danois,Special to The Sun | August 5, 2007
Gerry Garvin struts down the aisle with a black chef's smock, sunglasses, knee-length khaki shorts and clogs to deliver a cooking presentation at a health fair at a local church. As he prepares to make four dishes featuring cherry tomatoes, including ones with clams, mussels, and Chilean sea bass, a woman in the audience begins walking toward the back of the church. "Where you going?" he asks as he prepares the pan with oil. "Don't walk out when I'm trying to do my thing!" Garvin, who is in his late 30s and lives in Los Angeles, does his thing most days on TV One's Turn Up the Heat with G. Garvin.
FEATURES
By John Tanasychuk and John Tanasychuk,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 9, 1991
EVERYONE'S FELT SOMETHING heart and soul.Now you can add heart-healthy soul to your experience. And that's soul as in soul food.For many, it seems an impossible combination. The food of the South has traditionally relied heavily on pork as a flavoring or ingredient. And frying meat in animal fat -- instead of baking or broiling it -- has added insult to injury."Fat is what makes food tastes good," admits registered dietitian Deborah Jeffries, formerly of Northwest General Hospital in Detroit.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
Soul food aficionados walked up to the restaurant, with its lemon-yellow front destroyed by fire and soot blackening its signs offering chopped cheese steak subs and chicken wings, and cried as if they'd seen their childhood home in ashes. The Yellow Bowl in the 1200 block of Greenmount Ave., one of Baltimore's oldest black-owned restaurants, was destroyed yesterday by a grill fire that erupted at 5:21 a.m. as a cook served early-morning customers."Oh my Lord, oh my Lord! There goes the best place in the whole city," mourned Charlene Jamison, a 40-year-old secretary and lifelong customer, as she looked through the shattered window at the charred counters.
NEWS
By Karlayne R. Parker and Karlayne R. Parker,UniSun Editor | June 3, 2007
Several years ago, I was fascinated by Michael Cottman's presentation at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture about diving to see the wreck of the Henrietta Marie, a sunken slave ship off the coast of Florida. Cottman's discussion, timed with an exhibit at the museum, made me proud to see someone who looked like me talking about scuba diving and seeing the the ocean's underworld. It was after Cottman's talk that I got the idea that there must be other African-Americans who have an adventuresome spirit.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | June 3, 2007
As a cuisine connoisseur -- with a specialty in soul food -- one of the most exciting things about moving to a new city is all of the restaurants to be discovered. A few years ago, I moved from New Orleans to Baltimore with high expectations. With a similar African-American population, surely Charm City would offer a bevy of eateries with foods founded by its largest ethnic group -- perfectly seasoned fried chicken, oh-so-tender collard greens, or sugary-sweet honey butter cornbread. While Baltimore does not have the equivalent of a marquee soul food restaurant like Washington's B. Smith's, New York's Sylvia's or New Orleans' Dooky Chase, it does have several offerings near the downtown area that satisfy the craving.
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