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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez, D-Texas, chairman of the House Banking Committee, yesterday called for an investigation of money manager George Soros' foreign exchange trading activities.Mr. Soros, the most highly paid money manager in the world, runs the Curacao-based Quantum Fund, which has more than $2.5 billion of assets. Mr. Soros' personal interest in funds he runs was worth about $785 million in late 1992, Forbes magazine estimated.And in its annual ranking of the financial community's top earners, appearing in the July 6 issue, Financial World placed Mr. Soros in the top place with a record $650 million, beating former junk bond king Michael Milken, who was estimated to have made $500 million in one year before being convicted in 1990 of conspiring to violate securities and tax laws.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
On the field next to Northeast Middle School, young refugees Abhishek Yonghang and Ahmed Osman kicked a soccer ball around, each grateful for the common connection as they adjust to a new life far from their former homes in Nepal and Somalia. Three miles away in a classroom at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, junior Wayne Young slipped a suit jacket over his school uniform for debate practice with the Urban Debate League, trying to "look the part" of the Harvard law grad he envisions himself to one day be. The lives of these Baltimore teens are among the thousands influenced by George Soros, a billionaire philanthropist who decided 15 years ago that the city, with severe crime and poverty and just enough potential, was ripe for an experiment.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2000
It didn't take long for billionaire philanthropist George Soros to ignore the power players surrounding him at an event in his honor yesterday -- and to head directly into a conversation with the kids he is trying to help. Taking a tour of Baltimore's Living Classrooms Foundation -- one of the nonprofit organizations funded by the Baltimore branch of his Open Society Institute -- Soros stopped to talk to three young men working in a foundation program to teach juvenile offenders carpentry skills.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
Seems to me that philanthropist George Soros could pitch in and save Big Bird instead of helping President Obama reach his $1 billion campaign donation goal ("Big lies and Big Bird," Oct. 8). As far as "big lies" goes, what Mr. Romney is saying is no worse than what candidate Obama said in calling President George W. Bush "unpatriotic and irresponsible" for adding to the deficit. It's funny, too, that Mr. Romney's plan sounds like Gov. Martin O'Malley's holding the tax-rate the same but changing deductions and exemptions for higher-salaried folks.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
On the second day of his first visit to Baltimore, billionaire George Soros described this region as a miniature version of the world, with much of the world's bounty, problems and promise.Just as developed nations enjoy a bigger share of global wealth than countries on the economic periphery, so is the Baltimore region split between the have-less and the have-more, Soros told members of the Greater Baltimore Alliance, an economic development group."Here, it is the center that is disadvantaged, and it is [necessary]
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1997
If you have a practical plan to help the poor in Baltimore, billionaire George Soros may have a $48,750 fellowship for you.The first initiative of his Open Society Institute -- Baltimore since he announced plans in August to spend $25 million here will award about 10 "community fellowships" for work "in service to disadvantaged communities" in the city.The 18-month fellowships will begin in June or July and are renewable for 18 months. The total dollar value of the commitment, with renewals, is about $1 million.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mark Matthews contributed to this article | August 3, 1997
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's advocacy of drug treatment on demand has caught the attention of a major philanthropist who plans to spend at least $25 million in Baltimore over the next five years to promote economic development and social service programs.Next month, currency speculator George Soros will establish a branch office of his Open Society Institute in Baltimore. The institute, an international charitable foundation whose U.S. headquarters is in New York, is the latest national or international philanthropic organization to set up shop in Baltimore in the past decade.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - A House GOP committee chairman didn't mean to suggest that he would seek legislative redress against baseball if it selects a Washington Nationals ownership group that includes financier George Soros, an aide said yesterday. Tom Davis, a Virginia Republican who chairs the Government Reform Committee, was quoted Monday in Roll Call, a Capitol Hill newspaper, saying that Major League Baseball could face a political fight if it selects Soros, who has bankrolled liberal causes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 21, 2002
PARIS - In a bizarre ending to a 14-year-old investigation, a French court convicted American financier George Soros yesterday of insider trading and fined him 2.2 million euros, or about $2.3 million. The verdict by the three-member bench came after a prosecutor recommended during a hearing last month that, at the minimum, Soros should be fined 2.2 million euros, the sum he is accused of having earned on what officials say were illegal transactions. In a statement, Soros, who was in New York yesterday, expressed his belief that the charges against him were "unfounded and without merit" and said he was "astonished and dismayed by the court's ruling."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 1997
NEW YORK -- George Soros, the Hungarian-born American financier and philanthropist, said yesterday that he would spend as much as $500 million in the next three years in Russia trying to improve health care, expand educational opportunities and help retrain the military for civilian jobs.In a telephone interview from Moscow, Soros said he would announce the initiative in eight fields today. This latest gift would make him Russia's largest philanthropist and largest individual Western investor, as well as a donor whose presence rivals that of the United States, which gave Russia $95 million in foreign aid last year.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
Thanks for the fascinating article about the Bradley Foundations financed by donations originating from the Koch and Scaife billions ("The right's $350 million idea train," Dec. 18). Too bad this wealth cannot be devoted to good works like alleviating poverty, ignorance and disease, as the Rockefeller and Carnegie fortunes did in the past and Gates, Buffet and Soros families are doing at present. Instead, the Bradley Foundation is acting as a "malefactor of great wealth," as Teddy Roosevelt famously put it, to peddle its extreme right-wing ideology.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
George Soros, one of the richest men on the planet, has given more than $8 billion to charities in Baltimore and around the world. Last week, he made headlines with one of his biggest gifts ever — $100 million to the Human Rights Watch. The billionaire investor and philanthropist is known for supporting liberal causes, and the Human Rights Watch donation is aimed at expanding the advocacy group's geographic reach and donor base. In Baltimore, Soros also is known for opening an Open Society Institute office more than a decade ago to study the causes of persistent poverty and invest in solutions.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
The Open Society Institute of Baltimore, a foundation funded by billionaire philanthropist George Soros, is giving $1.5 million to four city nonprofits for job training for low-income residents. The award will be accompanied by another $1.5 million of state and federal funds. The $3 million in funding will help provide job training and placement services to 141 people with criminal convictions who otherwise would be unable to find work. The four nonprofits receiving funding are the Center for Urban Families, Civic Works, Group Ministries and the Job Opportunities Task Force.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
A youth advocate from California was named a 2010 Soros Justice Fellow and will work with the Annie E. Casey Foundation in Baltimore this fall. Zachary Norris was named one of 18 2010 Soros Justice Fellows by the Open Society Institute. The fellows work to improve issues such as racial profiling and federal immigration enforcement within the U.S. Department of Justice. Norris will start in September working with the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative through the Annie E. Casey Foundation in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Ten Baltimore organizations have received $2.6 million in matching grants from philanthropist George Soros to fund programs intended to ease escalating needs amid the economic downturn, the Open Society Institute's city chapter announced. Soros created the Special Fund for Poverty Alleviation to help people particularly affected by the dismal financial climate. He allocated a total of $5 million for OSI's Baltimore office, the remainder of which will be distributed in 2010. "In this particular time with the economic recession, some populations that are most vulnerable have been very hard hit," said Diana Morris, OSI-Baltimore's director.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | May 13, 2008
It's taken on drug addiction and tackled school suspensions. It's helped dozens of social entrepreneurs start nonprofits in some of the dreariest corners of Baltimore and along the way forged strong bonds with the city's political, social and financial elite. And now, after a decade of work, the Open Society Institute-Baltimore, an experiment in social urban philanthropy, is celebrating. The organization that billionaire financier George Soros created to tackle some of the city's most intractable problems is turning 10. And it is on target to meet Soros' challenge of raising $20 million from local sources by 2010, which he would increase with $10 million more.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1998
In one of its first steps to improve life in Baltimore, the local arm of billionaire George Soros' philanthropy has awarded almost $500,000 in fellowships to 10 area residents.The Open Society Institute-Baltimore has awarded "community fellowships" -- each worth $48,750 -- for the recipients to improve inner-city life in ways such as raising voices in song, raising vegetables or raising the consciousness of juvenile offenders.The 18-month fellowships, announced yesterday, are a key part of Soros' plan to spend $25 million in five years to help the poor in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1998
Talk about a high-flying stock. Igen International Inc., a relatively unknown Gaithersburg biotechnology firm, has seen its share price zoom an astonishing 742 percent since April.Yesterday, shares jumped $4.5625 to an all-time high of $40 -- more than eight times its 52-week low of $4.75 of April 24. The fastest run-up in the company's stock price has occurred since Christmas, when shares traded at $12.75.Propelling the ascent is a recently signed deal with pharmaceutical giant Pfizer Inc. and a thumbs-up from two investment funds tied to investment guru George Soros.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,sun reporter | March 13, 2007
A gift from the charitable arm of Baltimore investment firm T. Rowe Price has put the Open Society Institute's fundraising campaign closer to the $20 million goal set by billionaire financier George Soros, who founded the institute nearly a decade ago and promised an additional $10 million if local residents also contributed. The institute has raised more than $7 million, including in recent months a $250,000 donation from the T. Rowe Price Associates Foundation and a $200,000 contribution from an anonymous donor, said Debra Rubino, OSI spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Anne-Marie O'Connor and Anne-Marie O'Connor,Los Angeles Times | September 10, 2006
George Soros, the Hungarian Holocaust survivor whose fortune is matched only by his philanthropy, in Baltimore and elsewhere around the world, pioneered a kind of self-styled approach to global reform that made him, in the words of the Carnegie Endowment's Morton Abramowitz, "the only private citizen who had his own foreign policy." With no sluggish bureaucracy to answer to, he rose to prominence with stunningly practical bequests delivered in a timely manner. There was his $50 million donation to the besieged citizens of Sarajevo in 1993 that financed a water plant so that women did not need to rely on the public wells where Serbian snipers picked them off with ease.
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