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By Joe Nawrozki and Lou Ferrara | April 9, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- While police today attempted to determine the exact cause of death of a 21-year-old senior found in her sorority house bedroom yesterday, University of Maryland and county health officials today were distributing antibiotics to prevent a potential outbreak of spinal meningitis.The body of Jennifer Lynn Jones, 21, of Merritt Island, Fla., was discovered about 6 p.m. in her room at the Delta Delta Delta house in the 4600 block of College Ave., just east of the campus, said Prince George's County Police Capt.
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NEWS
May 29, 2014
I agreed with your conclusions in today's editorial on misogyny ( "Misogyny not to be ignored," May 28), but if you really need to seek an answer to where all this hatred of women comes from, look no farther than religion. As Christopher Hitchens extensively documented, every major religion in the world is virulently anti-woman. Anyone with any doubts as to the absolute truth of Mr. Hitchens writings need only look at the way women are being treated every day, right now, by Orthodox Jews, Muslims, Buddhists and Christians.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Lou Ferrara | April 10, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- The death this week of a University of Maryland senior in her sorority house bedroom was not caused by meningitis as originally believed, the director of the campus health center said today.Dr. Margaret Bridwell, the director, said that a preliminary report from the state Medical Examiner's Office in Baltimore showed that Jennifer Lynn Jones, 21, did not die of the disease, as campus medical officials had said yesterday."It is not meningitis, they now say," Dr. Bridwell said.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
They will gather in a room lined with mannequins and ladies' dresses, old photographs and display cases, precious remnants of the once- great institutions they loved. They will meet and greet, nibble on desserts and sip coffee and tea. But mostly they will remember what many recall as the greatest experience of their lives. They are the former employees of Baltimore's downtown department stores, exiles from Howard Street when Howard Street was Howard Street: a commercial center lined with classy stores and patronized by women in hats and white gloves.
NEWS
By Lou Ferrara and Lou Ferrara,Contributing Writer David Michael Ettlin and Joe Nawrozki contributed to this story | April 10, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- The University of Maryland Health Center was flooded with calls and visits yesterday in a meningitis scare prompted by the death of a 21-year-old sorority house resident Wednesday.The state medical examiner's office said results from an autopsy the body of Jennifer Lynn Jones will not be complete until Monday, but a preliminary investigation indicated that meningitis was the cause of death.The illness is caused by either a viral or bacterial infection, and can be spread through airborne germs or by sharing food and drink or by kissing.
NEWS
By Lou Ferrara and Lou Ferrara,Contributing Writer Staff writer Lan Nguyen contributed to this article | April 11, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- State medical examiners said yesterday that the death earlier this week of University of Maryland student Jennifer Lynn Jones was not caused by meningitis as originally believed, raising new questions as to how the 21-year-old died in her sorority house bedroom."
NEWS
May 29, 2014
I agreed with your conclusions in today's editorial on misogyny ( "Misogyny not to be ignored," May 28), but if you really need to seek an answer to where all this hatred of women comes from, look no farther than religion. As Christopher Hitchens extensively documented, every major religion in the world is virulently anti-woman. Anyone with any doubts as to the absolute truth of Mr. Hitchens writings need only look at the way women are being treated every day, right now, by Orthodox Jews, Muslims, Buddhists and Christians.
NEWS
By Graeme Browning and Graeme Browning,Graeme Browning is a business reporter for The Sun | December 24, 1990
WHEN I WAS a sophomore in college in the early 1970s I knew a blonde 21-year-old woman whose manner was so gentle and whose approach to everyone so friendly that her friends called her ''Lovely,'' from ''Lovely Girl,'' the favorite old song of the sorority of which she was president.I was a member of that sorority, and because my grades were good I was allowed to move out of my dormitory and into the sorority house the year that Lovely, to the consternation of nearly everyone who knew her, suddenly got married.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
They will gather in a room lined with mannequins and ladies' dresses, old photographs and display cases, precious remnants of the once- great institutions they loved. They will meet and greet, nibble on desserts and sip coffee and tea. But mostly they will remember what many recall as the greatest experience of their lives. They are the former employees of Baltimore's downtown department stores, exiles from Howard Street when Howard Street was Howard Street: a commercial center lined with classy stores and patronized by women in hats and white gloves.
NEWS
By Nicole Gill and Nicole Gill,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 20, 1998
SILVER SPRING - Two dozen historic buildings at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center are in such disrepair that the Pentagon is considering ripping down or selling the structures.The Forest Glen Annex buildings, which served as a women's finishing school from the late 19th century until World War II, go largely unused and are too expensive to maintain, Army officials say.But preservationists blame the Army for the state of the buildings, which have been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1972.
NEWS
By Nicole Gill and Nicole Gill,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 20, 1998
SILVER SPRING - Two dozen historic buildings at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center are in such disrepair that the Pentagon is considering ripping down or selling the structures.The Forest Glen Annex buildings, which served as a women's finishing school from the late 19th century until World War II, go largely unused and are too expensive to maintain, Army officials say.But preservationists blame the Army for the state of the buildings, which have been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1972.
NEWS
By Lou Ferrara and Lou Ferrara,Contributing Writer Staff writer Lan Nguyen contributed to this article | April 11, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- State medical examiners said yesterday that the death earlier this week of University of Maryland student Jennifer Lynn Jones was not caused by meningitis as originally believed, raising new questions as to how the 21-year-old died in her sorority house bedroom."
NEWS
By Lou Ferrara and Lou Ferrara,Contributing Writer David Michael Ettlin and Joe Nawrozki contributed to this story | April 10, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- The University of Maryland Health Center was flooded with calls and visits yesterday in a meningitis scare prompted by the death of a 21-year-old sorority house resident Wednesday.The state medical examiner's office said results from an autopsy the body of Jennifer Lynn Jones will not be complete until Monday, but a preliminary investigation indicated that meningitis was the cause of death.The illness is caused by either a viral or bacterial infection, and can be spread through airborne germs or by sharing food and drink or by kissing.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Lou Ferrara | April 10, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- The death this week of a University of Maryland senior in her sorority house bedroom was not caused by meningitis as originally believed, the director of the campus health center said today.Dr. Margaret Bridwell, the director, said that a preliminary report from the state Medical Examiner's Office in Baltimore showed that Jennifer Lynn Jones, 21, did not die of the disease, as campus medical officials had said yesterday."It is not meningitis, they now say," Dr. Bridwell said.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Lou Ferrara | April 9, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- While police today attempted to determine the exact cause of death of a 21-year-old senior found in her sorority house bedroom yesterday, University of Maryland and county health officials today were distributing antibiotics to prevent a potential outbreak of spinal meningitis.The body of Jennifer Lynn Jones, 21, of Merritt Island, Fla., was discovered about 6 p.m. in her room at the Delta Delta Delta house in the 4600 block of College Ave., just east of the campus, said Prince George's County Police Capt.
NEWS
By Graeme Browning and Graeme Browning,Graeme Browning is a business reporter for The Sun | December 24, 1990
WHEN I WAS a sophomore in college in the early 1970s I knew a blonde 21-year-old woman whose manner was so gentle and whose approach to everyone so friendly that her friends called her ''Lovely,'' from ''Lovely Girl,'' the favorite old song of the sorority of which she was president.I was a member of that sorority, and because my grades were good I was allowed to move out of my dormitory and into the sorority house the year that Lovely, to the consternation of nearly everyone who knew her, suddenly got married.
NEWS
By Lou Ferrara and Lou Ferrara,Contributing Writer Staff writers David Michael Ettlin and Joe Nawrozki contributed to this article | April 10, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- The University of Maryland Health Center was flooded with calls and visits yesterday in a meningitis scare prompted by the death of a 21-year-old sorority house resident Wednesday.The state medical examiner's office said results from an autopsy the body of Jennifer Lynn Jones will not be complete until Monday, but a preliminary investigation indicated that meningitis was the cause of death.The illness is caused by either a viral or bacterial infection, and can be spread through airborne germs or by sharing food and drink or by kissing.
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