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NEWS
October 4, 2004
Linda Anne Cooke Sorkin, a former librarian, died Friday of complications from congestive heart failure at North Arundel Hospital. The Crofton resident was 65. Born Linda Anne Cooke in Brooklyn, N.Y., she graduated in 1960 from Pembroke College of Brown University with a degree in classical studies. A year later, she married Rodney Bruce Sorkin of New York City. The couple resided in California, Ohio and Germany, and moved to Maryland in 1969. When not at home caring for her two children, Mrs. Sorkin pursued her avid interest in library work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
In my April 1st preview of Amy Schumer's second season, I wrote about a sketch she does with Josh Charles spoofing Aaron Sorkin's TV style. "A double Baltimore hit: On April 15, Josh Charles guests stars, and he's terrific as one of Schumer's co-workers in a fast food restaurant," I wrote. "The co-stars alone would make this 30 minutes not to be missed on Tuesday nights this spring. " The piece aired last night with Charles and Schumer bringing trademark Sorkin urgency, anger, sexual frustration and angst to life in this wickedly clever clip.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 26, 2004
HARRISBURG, Pa. - A judge sentenced former Rite Aid Corp. Vice President Eric Sorkin to five months in federal prison and five months of home detention yesterday for lying about his role in an accounting fraud that cost the company $1.6 billion in profit. U.S. District Judge Sylvia Rambo also ordered Sorkin to serve two years of supervised release. He also was fined $5,000, First Assistant U.S. Attorney Martin Carlson said. Sorkin is the first of five executives who pleaded guilty to the fraud to be sentenced.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
For a while last year, I started to worry about liking Aaron Sorkin's “The Newsroom” so much. Most of my colleagues didn't like it - not that being out of sync with the herd ever bothered me greatly. It usually turned out that I did better work outside the herd, the farther the better. And by the end of the season, some critics even started coming around on the HBO drama. What worried me was being so in tune with Sorkin's vision. I once did an interview with him in his office on the Warner Bros.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 8, 2003
HARRISBURG, Pa. - A Rite Aid Corp. vice president should be tried on obstruction of justice charges separately from three former executives accused of accounting fraud at the No. 3 drugstore chain, a judge ruled yesterday. Eric Sorkin's case would be prejudiced by trying him with Rite Aid's former Chief Executive Officer Martin Grass, former Chief Counsel Franklin Brown and former Chief Financial Officer Frank Bergonzi, U.S. District Judge Sylvia Rambo ruled. Sorkin is accused of lying to a grand jury and conspiring with Brown and Grass to obstruct investigations into an alleged accounting fraud that led Rite Aid to restate $1.6 billion in profits.
FEATURES
By SCOTT COLLINS and SCOTT COLLINS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 18, 2005
Writer Aaron Sorkin knows something about fighting with TV executives. Now he has decided to make a show about them - and has persuaded NBC to fork over big money for the idea. Two years after leaving The West Wing, the long-running White House drama he created for NBC, Sorkin clinched a deal with the network for Studio 7, a behind-the-scenes sendup of a late-night comedy series very much like NBC's Saturday Night Live. NBC, which beat out CBS for Studio 7 after a lively bidding war, will pay at least $1.6 million per one-hour episode and is aiming for the fall 2006 schedule, according to an executive familiar with the deal.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
Two former Rite Aid Corp. executives who were indicted in an extensive accounting fraud last year are expected to plead guilty today in federal court in Harrisburg, Pa., after the company's former chief executive pleaded guilty last week and agreed to cooperate against them. Franklin C. Brown, 75, Rite Aid's former vice chairman and general counsel, is expected to change his plea to guilty to one or more charges related to an accounting scandal that forced Rite Aid to reduce its stated earnings by $1.6 billion in 2000.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
On June 17, 2003, MARY E. SMARDO (nee Lesko); beloved wife of Frank L. Smardo; devoted mother of Sylvia Sorkin and her husband Alan, Frances "Toni" Dowd of Dallas, TX; loving grandmother of David Sorkin of College Park, MD, Suzanne Sorkin, of Poughkeepsi, NY, Sarah Dowd and Rebekkah Dowd, both of Dallas, TX; great-grandmother of Neil Sorkin of College Park, MD; dear sister of Helen Mallory of Altoona, PA and the late Rev. Basil Lesko of Williamsport, PA....
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 16, 1992
"A Few Good Men" is a court-martial drama, but the chief question it raises isn't about guilt or innocence, but rather: What is the definition of honor?Written by relative newcomer Aaron Sorkin, the play, which opened at the Mechanic Theatre last night, has a rip-roaring cliffhanger of a plot: The year is 1986 and two Marines have confessed to the murder of a member of their unit during a hazing-like disciplinary action known as a Code Red. The military wants the case out of the way as quickly as possible; is the confession part of a coverup?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 3, 2001
It's daring, but is it wise? It seems like socially conscious television, but could it wind up being seen instead as an act of unrestrained ego? Those are the kinds of questions that greet the return of The West Wing tonight with a special episode written by creator Aaron Sorkin in response to terrorist attacks on America Sept. 11. NBC has chosen neither to make the episode available for preview nor to offer many specifics. But, given the enormity of the events to which it promises to speak and the incredible risk Sorkin and NBC are taking with one of America's most beloved series, a little context couldn't hurt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimpore Sun | July 2, 2012
HBO Monday announced that it is picking up Aaron Sorkin's"The Newsroom" for a second season, along with "True Blood" for a sixth. I love the way "The Newsroom"  calls out the press for losing its sense of purpose. Some members of the press didn't like being called out that way. (See my other blog posts about "The Newsroom" to the left of this post.) A couple of pieces of very good news from HBO.  
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
As I have said earlier, I believe the pilot for Aaron Sorkin's "The Newsroom"  is one of the decade's best productions. I love this series for the way it calls out the press for having lost its sense of purpose. But the press doesn't like be called out that way, and you can see that in some of the reviews attacking Sunday's pilot for being sanctimonious and self-righteous. I love the righteousness of this series -- self or not. Here's video from CNN's  "Reliable Sources" Sunday of a discussion I had with some of my colleagues who don't like "The Newsroom" very much at all. I respect their views.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
UPDATE: I am going to be on CNN's "Reliable Sources" at 11 a.m. (ET) Sunday discussing "The Newsroom" with Maureen Ryan, from the Huffington Post, and Adam Buckman, of Xfinity TV. The Aaron Sorkin series premieres Sunday night at 10 on HBO. This is one of the 20 best pilots of the last 20 years. Don't miss it. I have been thinking about the pilot for Aaron Sorkin's new HBO drama, "The Newsroom," for more than a week now. I screened it last week for a radio piece on WYPR-FM (88.1)
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2006
There isn't a single dud in the lineup of Colonial Players' "New Directions" festival of nine one-act plays. The festival, which opened July 20, continues in two segments with showings tonight through Sunday afternoon: The A slate consists of Christopher Durang's Mrs. Sorkin and Desire, Desire, Desire; J.B. McLendon's The Recipe; Audrey Cefaly's Fin and Euba; and Billy Rosenfield's Bridal Terrorism. The B slate includes Alice Gerstenberg's Fourteen; Michael Stang's The Veritas Machine; Ludmilla Bollow's Late/Late ... Computer Date; and Dorothy Parker's Here We Are. While Parker was a legendary wit and Durang is an established comedy writer, several of the other playwrights are from Maryland.
FEATURES
By SCOTT COLLINS and SCOTT COLLINS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 18, 2005
Writer Aaron Sorkin knows something about fighting with TV executives. Now he has decided to make a show about them - and has persuaded NBC to fork over big money for the idea. Two years after leaving The West Wing, the long-running White House drama he created for NBC, Sorkin clinched a deal with the network for Studio 7, a behind-the-scenes sendup of a late-night comedy series very much like NBC's Saturday Night Live. NBC, which beat out CBS for Studio 7 after a lively bidding war, will pay at least $1.6 million per one-hour episode and is aiming for the fall 2006 schedule, according to an executive familiar with the deal.
NEWS
October 4, 2004
Linda Anne Cooke Sorkin, a former librarian, died Friday of complications from congestive heart failure at North Arundel Hospital. The Crofton resident was 65. Born Linda Anne Cooke in Brooklyn, N.Y., she graduated in 1960 from Pembroke College of Brown University with a degree in classical studies. A year later, she married Rodney Bruce Sorkin of New York City. The couple resided in California, Ohio and Germany, and moved to Maryland in 1969. When not at home caring for her two children, Mrs. Sorkin pursued her avid interest in library work.
FEATURES
September 6, 2002
The shoplifting case against actress Winona Ryder moved closer to trial with a judge setting pretrial proceedings and suggesting the trial will start in October. Ryder, 30, did not appear at the courthouse yesterday for a conference between her attorney and the prosecutor to determine the schedule. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Elden S. Fox set a hearing for Thursday and said he expected the trial to begin within 30 days of that date. Ryder previously pleaded innocent to charges of second-degree burglary, grand theft, vandalism and possession of a controlled substance.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2006
There isn't a single dud in the lineup of Colonial Players' "New Directions" festival of nine one-act plays. The festival, which opened July 20, continues in two segments with showings tonight through Sunday afternoon: The A slate consists of Christopher Durang's Mrs. Sorkin and Desire, Desire, Desire; J.B. McLendon's The Recipe; Audrey Cefaly's Fin and Euba; and Billy Rosenfield's Bridal Terrorism. The B slate includes Alice Gerstenberg's Fourteen; Michael Stang's The Veritas Machine; Ludmilla Bollow's Late/Late ... Computer Date; and Dorothy Parker's Here We Are. While Parker was a legendary wit and Durang is an established comedy writer, several of the other playwrights are from Maryland.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 26, 2004
HARRISBURG, Pa. - A judge sentenced former Rite Aid Corp. Vice President Eric Sorkin to five months in federal prison and five months of home detention yesterday for lying about his role in an accounting fraud that cost the company $1.6 billion in profit. U.S. District Judge Sylvia Rambo also ordered Sorkin to serve two years of supervised release. He also was fined $5,000, First Assistant U.S. Attorney Martin Carlson said. Sorkin is the first of five executives who pleaded guilty to the fraud to be sentenced.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
Two former Rite Aid Corp. executives who were indicted in an extensive accounting fraud last year are expected to plead guilty today in federal court in Harrisburg, Pa., after the company's former chief executive pleaded guilty last week and agreed to cooperate against them. Franklin C. Brown, 75, Rite Aid's former vice chairman and general counsel, is expected to change his plea to guilty to one or more charges related to an accounting scandal that forced Rite Aid to reduce its stated earnings by $1.6 billion in 2000.
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