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By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | September 20, 1998
No matter how many times "natural" appears on the carton or how pricey the product, commercially manufactured frozen desserts can't compete with homemade - especially homemade fresh fruit sorbets.Sorbetlike concoctions of flavored ice and snow were first introduced to Europe from China, India and Arabia as early as the Crusades. Imported to the American Colonies just before the War of Independence, sorbet has never fallen far out of fashion.It's now enjoying a revival, thanks to the clamor for healthful, fat-free treats and design innovations in ice cream machines that don't rely on rock salt and ice.It's possible to make a sorbet of sorts from nothing more than unsweetened fruit, although adding simple sugar syrup both sweetens and refines the texture of the finished product.
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 1, 2007
>>>Pitango Gelato 802 S. Broadway, Baltimore -- 410-702-5828 Hours --noon-11 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Fridays-Saturdays; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sundays When it comes to quality, Pitango Gelato, a new high-end ice cream shop in Fells Point, may be a few scoops ahead of the curve. All of the store's products are made with grass-fed organic milk and other fresh ingredients. Your tongue will definitely notice the difference. So will your wallet.
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NEWS
December 13, 2006
Roasted Pineapple With Pineapple Sorbet Serves 4 seeds scraped from 1 split vanilla bean 1/2 cup dark-brown sugar 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 cup light rum or apple juice 1 whole large pineapple, peeled Pineapple Sorbet (see below) Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Heat the vanilla-bean seeds and sugars and rum in a large ovenproof saute pan over medium-low heat, stirring, until the sugars are completely dissolved. Add the pineapple to the pan and cook, gently turning it several times, until thoroughly coated with the rum mixture.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | December 13, 2006
Jewish Cooking for All Seasons Fresh, Flavorful Kosher Recipes for Holidays and Every Day Enlitened Kosher Cooking By Nechama Cohen Feldheim Publishers / 2006 / $39.95 If Laura Frankel is a gourmet cook who also happens to keep kosher, Nechama Cohen is a kosher cook who changed her ways after a lifestyle-altering diagnosis. For Cohen, chicken soup is no longer greasy, chocolate mousse doesn't have to be full of fat and chopped liver doesn't have to be high in cholesterol. She has adapted all the traditional recipes that Frankel eschewed to the low-carb, low-fat, sugar-free diet she had to adopt when she was diagnosed with diabetes.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 1, 2007
>>>Pitango Gelato 802 S. Broadway, Baltimore -- 410-702-5828 Hours --noon-11 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Fridays-Saturdays; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sundays When it comes to quality, Pitango Gelato, a new high-end ice cream shop in Fells Point, may be a few scoops ahead of the curve. All of the store's products are made with grass-fed organic milk and other fresh ingredients. Your tongue will definitely notice the difference. So will your wallet.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | October 24, 1999
Red Emperor and Flame Tokay, black Ribier, purple-blue Concord, yellow-gold Muscat, green Thompson: Autumn grapes have a greatly expanded season, the result of improved varieties and innovative harvesting and storage practices.Like many other fruits, grapes don't get sweeter after they've been picked, so regardless of the variety, look for well-developed color unless you like sour grapes. Red or purple varieties are sweetest when their color is deep and rich; in golden and green varieties, a yellow or amber cast signals sweetness.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | December 13, 2006
Jewish Cooking for All Seasons Fresh, Flavorful Kosher Recipes for Holidays and Every Day Enlitened Kosher Cooking By Nechama Cohen Feldheim Publishers / 2006 / $39.95 If Laura Frankel is a gourmet cook who also happens to keep kosher, Nechama Cohen is a kosher cook who changed her ways after a lifestyle-altering diagnosis. For Cohen, chicken soup is no longer greasy, chocolate mousse doesn't have to be full of fat and chopped liver doesn't have to be high in cholesterol. She has adapted all the traditional recipes that Frankel eschewed to the low-carb, low-fat, sugar-free diet she had to adopt when she was diagnosed with diabetes.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | May 12, 1999
Adding punch to outdoor partyWhether you're at the beach or creating a seaside fantasy in your back yard, "Modern Grill & Garden" (Longstreet, 1999) by Martha Gill brings outdoor dining to the forefront. Enjoy barbecues, garden parties, twilight celebrations and casual get-togethers with creative centerpieces and menus that include beverages such as Modern Punch: 4 quarts ginger ale, 12-ounce can mango or pineapple nectar, 1 liter rum and 1 pint lemon sorbet, softened. In a punch bowl, combine first 3 ingredients.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | August 13, 1997
Roll out the oranges, roll back the heatHere's an elegant, fat-free and easy dessert for four:Orange cups4 oranges1 carton fruit sorbet1/3 cup frozen fruit juice concentrate (raspberry or strawberry-lemonade), thawed but undilutedfresh mint sprigsSlice the oranges a quarter of the way down and hollow out. Fill with a scoop of sorbet. Place on a dessert plate and drizzle with the concentrate as a sauce. Garnish with fresh mint.-- Adapted from an Edy's Ice Cream recipeJulia Child's 85thDon't miss Mary Cantwell's 85th-birthday tribute to Julia Child -- the woman Cantwell calls "the John Wayne of cuisine" -- in the August issue of Food & Wine.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and By Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | July 27, 2005
A convenient shift to sticks Honey and lemon are nice, but maybe it's time to try something different in your tea. Stash Tea Co. has an answer -- Agave Nectar Sticks. Made from agave plant juice, these nectar sticks come in convenient small serving packages that can be stored easily in a pocket or purse. Agave Nectar Sticks are available by calling 800-826-4218 or online at www.stashtea.com. The suggested retail price is $4.50 per box of 20. -- Brooke Snyder SORBET WITH A Twist A bowl of sorbet is a refreshing and light treat on a hot summer day, but here's another way to enjoy a cooling fruit sorbet -- turn it into a margarita and sip it. This easy recipe is from Natural Choice, an organic frozen dessert company in California.
NEWS
December 13, 2006
Roasted Pineapple With Pineapple Sorbet Serves 4 seeds scraped from 1 split vanilla bean 1/2 cup dark-brown sugar 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 cup light rum or apple juice 1 whole large pineapple, peeled Pineapple Sorbet (see below) Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Heat the vanilla-bean seeds and sugars and rum in a large ovenproof saute pan over medium-low heat, stirring, until the sugars are completely dissolved. Add the pineapple to the pan and cook, gently turning it several times, until thoroughly coated with the rum mixture.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and By Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | July 27, 2005
A convenient shift to sticks Honey and lemon are nice, but maybe it's time to try something different in your tea. Stash Tea Co. has an answer -- Agave Nectar Sticks. Made from agave plant juice, these nectar sticks come in convenient small serving packages that can be stored easily in a pocket or purse. Agave Nectar Sticks are available by calling 800-826-4218 or online at www.stashtea.com. The suggested retail price is $4.50 per box of 20. -- Brooke Snyder SORBET WITH A Twist A bowl of sorbet is a refreshing and light treat on a hot summer day, but here's another way to enjoy a cooling fruit sorbet -- turn it into a margarita and sip it. This easy recipe is from Natural Choice, an organic frozen dessert company in California.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | June 16, 2004
Sometimes it's good to be blue. Highbush blueberries are in season, ready to lend their flavor to ice-cream toppings, pancakes and smoothies. For a cool treat, try this recipe from the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council: Line the bottom and sides of an 8-inch-by-4-inch loaf pan with a double layer of waxed paper, folding the paper to fit smoothly. In a small bowl, stir together 1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts and 1/4 cup blueberry preserves. Set aside. Spoon 1 pint of slightly softened orange sorbet into loaf pan, smoothing to make an even layer.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | September 3, 2003
The arrival of September doesn't mean that watermelon days have to be over. For a creative dessert, try this Watermelon Baked Alaska from Chandra Mohan, sous-chef of the Club International at the Drake Hotel in Chicago. Combine 4 cups watermelon juice, 1/2 cup sugar and 4 teaspoons of lemon juice and mix until sugar is dissolved. Place in a sorbet machine or ice-cream maker and freeze. When nearly frozen, fold in 1/4 cup chocolate chips and mold sorbet into a log shape. Mix 3/4 cup water, 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons of egg whites, 2 tablespoons of whole eggs and 1/4 cup vegetable oil. Slowly add the mixture to 1 pound of white pudding cake mix, beating slowly with an electric mixer and then mixing on medium speed for 5 minutes.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | October 24, 1999
Red Emperor and Flame Tokay, black Ribier, purple-blue Concord, yellow-gold Muscat, green Thompson: Autumn grapes have a greatly expanded season, the result of improved varieties and innovative harvesting and storage practices.Like many other fruits, grapes don't get sweeter after they've been picked, so regardless of the variety, look for well-developed color unless you like sour grapes. Red or purple varieties are sweetest when their color is deep and rich; in golden and green varieties, a yellow or amber cast signals sweetness.
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | September 8, 1999
Mangoes are at their peak, so take advantage with a cool, fresh sorbet. Use only ripe mangoes for this intensely flavorful frozen treat. Instead of peeling mangoes, try this easy technique for obtaining the flesh: Set a mango on its end, like a guitar. Then, slice off the front of the "guitar" and the back of the "guitar," cutting as close to the pit as you can. Scoop out the pulp. You'll also get some pulp from the narrow strips that remain on each side. Mango Sorbet Serves 6 1 1/2 cups water 1 cup sugar 2 pounds ripe mangoes (2 to 3, depending on size)
FEATURES
By Kathy Casey and Kathy Casey,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | August 26, 1998
Frozen treats have long been a favorite for all ages. The first sound of the musical jingle from the ice cream truck sends children running to the streets to buy their favorite frozen delight. From Popsicles to big bowls of creamy ice cream to refreshing fruity sorbets and gelatos to icy granitas, they are all refreshing on a hot summer day.There are so many wonderful flavors and varieties of frozen treats to choose from. Chocolate ice cream is a perennial favorite, but vanilla is the one that has always topped the charts.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | June 16, 2004
Sometimes it's good to be blue. Highbush blueberries are in season, ready to lend their flavor to ice-cream toppings, pancakes and smoothies. For a cool treat, try this recipe from the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council: Line the bottom and sides of an 8-inch-by-4-inch loaf pan with a double layer of waxed paper, folding the paper to fit smoothly. In a small bowl, stir together 1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts and 1/4 cup blueberry preserves. Set aside. Spoon 1 pint of slightly softened orange sorbet into loaf pan, smoothing to make an even layer.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | May 12, 1999
Adding punch to outdoor partyWhether you're at the beach or creating a seaside fantasy in your back yard, "Modern Grill & Garden" (Longstreet, 1999) by Martha Gill brings outdoor dining to the forefront. Enjoy barbecues, garden parties, twilight celebrations and casual get-togethers with creative centerpieces and menus that include beverages such as Modern Punch: 4 quarts ginger ale, 12-ounce can mango or pineapple nectar, 1 liter rum and 1 pint lemon sorbet, softened. In a punch bowl, combine first 3 ingredients.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | September 20, 1998
No matter how many times "natural" appears on the carton or how pricey the product, commercially manufactured frozen desserts can't compete with homemade - especially homemade fresh fruit sorbets.Sorbetlike concoctions of flavored ice and snow were first introduced to Europe from China, India and Arabia as early as the Crusades. Imported to the American Colonies just before the War of Independence, sorbet has never fallen far out of fashion.It's now enjoying a revival, thanks to the clamor for healthful, fat-free treats and design innovations in ice cream machines that don't rely on rock salt and ice.It's possible to make a sorbet of sorts from nothing more than unsweetened fruit, although adding simple sugar syrup both sweetens and refines the texture of the finished product.
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