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By DOW JONES | November 19, 2004
GEORGETOWN, Del. - Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Officer Michael D. Eisner testified yesterday that he told Disney's directors he was hoping to "trade" President Michael Ovitz to Sony Corp. on the same day he told a national television audience that he would hire Ovitz again. In his fourth day on the witness stand, Eisner said he met with directors on Sept. 30, 1996, during a celebration of Walt Disney World's 25th anniversary, and told them he wanted Ovitz to leave Disney and was hoping Sony would hire him. If Ovitz went to Sony, that would have ended Disney's obligation to pay $140 million in severance.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 11, 2012
Nothing leaves a person jaded like a good Goliath-beats-David story. Such was the case in Baltimore in the mid-1980s when electronics giantSony Corp.famously succeeded in running a Filipino restaurant out of business because the owner had the nerve to attach her name to it. Her name was Sony Florendo. Sony Corp. attorneys came to town and filed a $2.9 million lawsuit against Sony's restaurant on Park Avenue, claiming trademark infringement. It didn't seem to matter that Sony Corp.
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FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | March 28, 1993
Film animator T. Carlos Williams of Baltimore recently won $2,500 award from Sony Corp. as part of its annual Sony Innovators Awards Program, a national competition recognizing African-American achievements in music and film/video.Mr. Williams was named 1993 Sony Innovator in Animation for his film "Da Bridge." His award includes a mentoring seminar conducted by film and video professionals."Live, Gifted and Black," a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra open rehearsal featuring the world premiere of "Festival Music," a piece by African-American composer Adolphus Hailstork, will begin at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 10, 2008
The Sony Corp., the Japanese consumer electronics giant, said yesterday that it would eliminate 8,000 jobs and rein in planned investment in reaction to the global economic slowdown. Sony, which had already announced scattered cost-saving measures, blamed rapid deterioration in the global economic outlook and the strength of the Japanese currency for the cuts. The measures, combined with a bleak outlook from a Sony rival, Samsung, and news that Japan's economy had contracted more than initially thought during the third quarter, highlighted how much Asian economies are suffering because of the financial crisis - now increasingly also an economic crisis - that began in the United States last year.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1993
Kodak gets Japanese patentEastman Kodak Co. said it received a Japanese patent for commonly used video recording technology, strengthening attempts to collect as much as $1 billion in royalties from camcorder makers.The approval earlier this month from a Japanese patent office follows a federal lawsuit Kodak filed against Sony Corp. and Sony Corp. of America. Kodak claims that the recording heads Sony puts in its videocassette recorders and camcorders copy technology that Kodak patented in the U.S. in 1981.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1992
Sony Corp. and Yamaha Corp., two venerable Japanese companies, have been hit hard by the worldwide economic slump.Sony Corp. said today that flagging domestic demand for consumer electronics would create the first annual operating loss in its history. The loss was estimated at $156 million for the fiscal year ending March 31. Sony has fallen victim to Japan's rapidly slowing economy and the slump in consumer demand.Meanwhile, Hiroshi Kawakami, president of Yamaha, the world's largest maker of musical instruments, resigned today.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | March 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., today rebuked Sony Corp. for forcing Baltimore restaurateur Sony Florendo to change the name of her businesses."
NEWS
August 13, 1998
TOKYO -- Sony Corp. said yesterday that it has modified some video cameras after finding they could be used for filming more of their subjects than meets the eye.Some versions of the Handycam have infrared technology that lets users shoot at night or in darkness in a "night shot" mode.But magazine reports revealed that in some conditions the camera can "see through" clothing -- underwear can show up, especially on those lightly dressed, and people wearing swimsuits look almost naked.Pub Date: 8/13/98
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | March 20, 1991
An article in yesterday's Business section said that Resurrecion "Sony" Robles-Florendo removed her nickname from her restaurants' name because of a court order. Ms. Florendo said yesterday that the action was actually the result of a compromise between her and Sony Corp.The Sun regrets the errors.The name "Sony" disappeared from Sony Florendo's Philippine-Asian restaurants yesterday -- the one in Harborplace and the one in Owings Mills, plus the banquet hall on Belair Road and the corporate offices on Park Avenue.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | March 6, 1992
Resurrecion "Sony" Florendo, a Baltimore restaurateur whose seven-year losing battle with Japan's giant Sony Corp. became a nationally publicized Goliath-stomps-David story, now faces an even more formidable adversary: the Internal Revenue Service.The IRS has filed liens amounting to $217,203 against Sony's Philippine-Asian Foods, which operates a restaurant at 324 Park Ave. and food stands at Harborplace and Owings Mills Town Center.According to liens filed Jan. 29 and Jan. 30 in Baltimore Circuit Court, the business' troubles with the IRS go back as far as 1984.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | November 5, 2006
Will my Sony Corp. stock ever do any better? - K.R., via the Internet Introduction of Trinitron television sets and Walkman portable music players vaulted this Japanese consumer-electronics brand to the forefront years ago, but that seems a distant past. It is good news for shoppers this holiday season, but not for Sony, that sales of liquid-crystal-display televisions will be competitive and price-driven. Rivals Panasonic Corp. of North America and Samsung Electronics Co. are ready for a fight.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | September 23, 2006
TOKYO -- Sony Corp., the world's biggest maker of video-game players, cut the price in Japan of its PlayStation 3 by about 20 percent, responding to complaints it cost twice as much as Microsoft Corp. and Nintendo Co. consoles. The game player will retail for 49,980 yen ($430) when it goes on sale Nov. 11, Ken Kutaragi, head of Sony Computer Entertainment Inc., said at the Tokyo Game Show yesterday. The company previously said it would sell the cheapest model for 59,800 yen, excluding tax. "They had to cut it because rivals have lower prices, and they may lower the price again if sales don't go well," said Yoku Ihara, head of equity research at Retela Crea Securities Co. in Tokyo.
BUSINESS
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2006
Apple Computer Inc. yesterday became the second PC maker to recall hundreds of thousands of potential- ly flammable laptop bat- teries. But the recall may prove less a headache for Apple Chief Executive Officer Steven P. Jobs than for Sony Corp. CEO Howard Stringer. That's because Sony manufactured the 1.8 million potentially problematic batteries in Apple's iBook G4 and PowerBook G4 laptops - just as it did the 4.1 million batteries recalled last week by Dell Inc. Now, other device makers are scrutinizing rechargeable lithium-ion batteries made by the little-known Sony Energy Devices Corp.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2006
Sony Corp. has patented technology that would prevent its PlayStation consoles from playing used, rented or borrowed video games - raising questions about whether the electronics and entertainment giant may attempt to redefine what it means to own something in the digital age. Speculation over Sony's plans for the technology have sparked a furor online as game fans and consumer advocates fret that the company may incorporate it into the PlayStation 3...
TOPIC
March 13, 2005
LOOKING FORWARD Monday Troy and Lee Ann Miller are to be sentenced in Mauston, Wis., for sending roses to their daughter for her birthday in violation of a no-contact order. Tuesday The Commerce Department reports on February retail sales. Wednesday Juan Manuel Alvarez, who is accused of killing 11 people by parking his truck in the path of a commuter train on Jan. 26, faces a hearing in California. Congressional hearings on sports steroid doping scandal begin in San Francisco with baseball players, owners and union officials subpoenaed.
BUSINESS
By DOW JONES | November 19, 2004
GEORGETOWN, Del. - Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Officer Michael D. Eisner testified yesterday that he told Disney's directors he was hoping to "trade" President Michael Ovitz to Sony Corp. on the same day he told a national television audience that he would hire Ovitz again. In his fourth day on the witness stand, Eisner said he met with directors on Sept. 30, 1996, during a celebration of Walt Disney World's 25th anniversary, and told them he wanted Ovitz to leave Disney and was hoping Sony would hire him. If Ovitz went to Sony, that would have ended Disney's obligation to pay $140 million in severance.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | November 10, 2000
"Here are tax-loss strategies for those investment `dogs,'" says Financial Perspectives newsletter: "Sell losing investments in the same year you realize gains. ... Buy individual stocks instead of mutual funds so you can better control sales and their taxes. ... Buy tax-free municipal bonds; the after-tax return ultimately counts." RISING SUN: "If you'd like to buy some of the hottest technology markets without paying excessive valuations, look to Tokyo. Japanese markets have been hit hard by spillover from Nasdaq weakness.
NEWS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | March 19, 1991
It's been four years since "Big Sony vs. Little Sony" headlines appeared in local and international papers, highlighting the unseemly controversy between small Baltimore restaurateur Sony Florendo and giant Japanese electronics manufacturer Sony Corp.But to Mrs. Florendo, owner of two Philippine-Asian restaurants and a catering operation bearing her name, the battle she fought in the U.S. District Court just a few blocks from her main office on Park Avenue is still very real.Today, Mrs. Florendo must take the name "Sony" off the signs on her restaurants at Harborplace and Owings Mills, her banquet hall on Belair Road and her main office downtown.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 24, 2003
TOKYO - Sony Corp.'s troubles continued last quarter, as its net profit fell 25 percent from the period a year earlier, the company said yesterday. Income from its games division plunged and its movie studio posted a loss. Sony, the world's second-largest electronics maker, also trimmed by 23 percent its full-year target for operating income, a measure that excludes taxes and one-time events, and reflects the core business. The company, which is trying to overhaul its electronics division, left its net profit target unchanged.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 21, 2003
Sony Corp., the world's second-largest maker of consumer electronics, plans to cut as many as 20,000 jobs, about 10 percent of its work force, by March 2006 as it stops making televisions in Japan and reduces administration costs, the Nihon Keizai newspaper said. "We are going to exit unprofitable business, sell or dispose of nonstrategic assets, reorganize global manufacturing, slim down sales and back office divisions, especially in Japan," spokesman Shigenori Yoshida said, without providing details.
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