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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | January 4, 1991
WHEN "SONS and Daughters," the new CBS series that premieres tonight, was yanked from the fall schedule, it seemed to have been put on a shelf way back in the network's closet.Indeed, many thought that it would never find its way to prime time other than perhaps as a midsummer throwaway.If you see this first hour or, even worse, happen to catch next week's second episode on Channel 11 (WBAL) at 10 o'clock, you'll understand why.The idea behind "Sons and Daughters" seems to have been to have taken the appeal of "thirtysomething" and broadened it for a wider audience.
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Tanika Davis, For The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
It's been almost two weeks since the elevator footage of former Ravens running back Ray Rice blew up the Internet. And I can't stop thinking about it. There are many reasons why the Rices' domestic-abuse video troubles me, but selfishly, I'll admit that the entire thing makes me think most about my own children. My husband and I have two boys, twins. We also have a daughter. So I've taken note of the reactions both to Rice's stunning brutality, to his then-fiancee's you-and-me-against-the-world response and to the legions of people on Twitter explaining why they stayed with their abusers (#WhyIStayed)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 4, 1991
Let's try to be kind. "Sons and Daughters," the new CBS family drama that debuts at 10 tonight on WBAL-TV (Channel 11), is, well, awful.It is hard to say which is worse -- the acting or the writing.There is one real actor on-screen, Don Murray. He plays Bing Hammersmith, the patriarch of the Hammersmith family, which is at the center of this weekly drama. But Murray's work is lost in a sea of performances that register at the level of bad dinner-theater acting. The ensemble of mumbles and stumbles is led by Lucie Arnaz, daughter of Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz.
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October 12, 2011
Laura and James Calabrese, of Laurel, announce the birth of their son, Anthony James Calabrese, on Sept. 25, 2011, at 9:26 p.m. He weighed 8 pounds, 7 ounces. He has a brother named Dominic, and his maternal grandparents are Raeann and Larry Katzbeck, of Elkridge. Staci and John Lawall Jr., of Elkridge, announce the birth of their daughter, Braelynn Nicole Lawall, on Aug. 1, 2011, at 10:44 p.m. She weighed 8 pounds, 7 ounces. Her grandparents are Marty Golden, of Jim Thorpe, Pa.; Kathy Doody, of New Market; and Sue and Chad Millinix, of Laurel.
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By Story by Mary Corey and M. Dion Thompson and Story by Mary Corey and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
As Van Evers squeezed beside the freshly unearthed casket for the six-hour ride, one thought consumed him: He was going to see his father.He never believed he'd have this chance. Three years old when his father, Medgar Evers, was killed, Van had only faint memories of a man leaving bubble gum cigars on his bunk bed. After the murder, he would pick up the phone and ask, "Have you seen my daddy?"Now, nearly 30 years later, the body was being brought to Albany, N.Y., from Arlington National Cemetery for an autopsy to bolster a case against the accused killer.
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By Story by M. Dion Thompson and Mary Corey and Story by M. Dion Thompson and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
Yolanda King sits in her stocking feet, sipping peppermint tea and passing on the gospel truth. "This old lady used to say, 'It's hard enough being who you is, let alone who you ain't.' "She smiles and her warm laughter fills the hotel room. The old lesson guides her life these days. Growing up in Atlanta, people were always watching Yolanda King, reminding her that being herself was not enough.She had a legacy to live up to and a hero's torch to carry. It was the same with the other men and women who lost their fathers during the civil rights era.The world expected more of a King, an Evers, a Shabazz.
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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
When Maryland's Pearl Harbor veterans gather today at the Inner Harbor to commemorate the 53rd anniversary of Japan's sneak attack on Hawaii Dec. 7, 1941, they will do so knowing their legacy is secure -- in the hands of their children.For the first time, members of the new Maryland chapter of the Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor Survivors will join the veterans as their official heirs.In 1988, the national Pearl Harbor Survivors Association formally appointed Sons and Daughters as the successor organization.
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By New York Times News Service | June 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Mike McCoy, whose father was killed in action in Vietnam in September 1964, said he had never celebrated Father's Day until yesterday, when he joined more than 300 other surviving sons and daughters of Vietnam veterans at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial."
NEWS
November 12, 1990
Now that President Bush has begun to use the words "offensive forces" to describe our troops in Saudi Arabia, the odds that war will occur have dramatically increased. This raises a question which has been either sublimated or ignored altogether for 20 years: Is an all-volunteer Army the right thing when soldiers do what soldiers are supposed to do, which is to fight and die in wars?It is a fact that young black men and women now constitute more than 30 percent of our army -- three times their proportion of the general population.
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By New York Times News Service | June 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Mike McCoy, whose father was killed in action in Vietnam in September 1964, said he had never celebrated Father's Day until yesterday, when he joined over 300 other surviving sons and daughters of Vietnam veterans at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
The four women of Maxx Factor make beautiful music together. That's a given, and it explains why the Sweet Adelines quartet from Baltimore was chosen to compete on "The Sing-Off," an a cappella music competition debuting on NBC Monday night. But maybe that's not the whole story. Given that the four members of Maxx Factor are all in their 30s or older, while their competition comes primarily from kids who are teenagers or only slightly older, maybe the producers hoped the four Baltimore-area women could provide something of a calming influence.
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By CYNTHIA TUCKER | February 6, 2006
ATLANTA -- Coretta Scott King can rest easy. She's earned it. The civil rights movement, which she embodied in the decades after her husband's assassination, transformed not just the South but the nation. In paying tribute to her, we should take just a little time to consider how far we've come. Because of the sacrifices she and her husband and so many others made, we have banished the laws and traditions of Jim Crow. An irresistible tide of social justice swept away the peculiar social customs that limited where black citizens might stand, sit, eat and sleep.
NEWS
December 17, 2005
WALTER FORMAN WICKES JR., age 90, of West Grove, died Tuesday, December 13, 2005 at his home. He was the husband of Helen Hickman Wickes with whom he shared 57 years of marriage. Born in Baltimore, MD, he was a son of the late Walter and Catherine O. Young Wickes Sr. Walter was a 60 year resident of the Unionville area and was a well known horse trainer and breeder. Survivors include in addition to his wife: five sons and daughters: William L., John C., Helen, Michael W., and Timothy B. He is also survived by nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
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By HALAINE S. STEINBERG | November 15, 2005
The young man on the telephone asked for my son in a voice that sounded friendly and familiar. But he wasn't calling to organize a late-night poker game, share a ride to the next Dave Matthews concert or score tickets to a Ravens game. On the contrary, he had an offer in hand - college tuition, a career opportunity, maybe even a $20,000 to $30,000 signing bonus - if my son wanted to join the Army. The Army, it seems, is once again looking for what the Marines call a few good men - if by "a few" it means 30,000 soldiers over the next few years, and if by "men" it is referring to the teenagers it is recruiting from high schools across the country.
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By Cynthia Tucker | October 25, 2004
ATLANTA - Because Dick Cheney and his wife, Lynne, managed to change the conversation about homosexuality to a contentious discussion of whether John Kerry smeared their daughter, there was little public discussion about the original question during that third debate: Do you believe homosexuality is a choice? If you want to condemn gays to hell, it helps to believe they have chosen a "lifestyle" based "simply on the premise of selfish hedonism," as Alan L. Keyes, the GOP candidate for Senate in Illinois, recently said of the Cheneys' lesbian daughter, Mary.
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By Michael D'Antonio | July 21, 2004
IN THE WINTER of 1956, a runaway orphan named Fred Boyce was captured by police and returned to the Walter E. Fernald State School in Massachusetts, where he was stripped, drugged and thrown into solitary confinement. When he awoke, he taunted a guard into opening the door and ran through the snow, half naked, to another building. There he demanded to see a school official and posed the question every boy at Fernald wanted to ask: Would you put your own child in this place? The answer Fred heard then -- an embarrassed "no" -- would be echoed by the officials who run juvenile facilities across the country, including Maryland's Cheltenham Youth Facility and Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, where federal auditors have found a "deeply disturbing degree of physical abuse" as well as deficient health care, education and mental health treatment.
NEWS
September 10, 1990
Here is a summary of our endorsements in some key contested races in tomorrow's primary elections.In the governor's contest, it is a non-race on the Democratic side: William Donald Schaefer is our choice. On the Republican side, a closer race, we favor William S. Shepard as the standard-bearer of the moderate wing of his party.Among Maryland's eight congressional districts, only the 1st District is providing a significant race. There, we favor Democrat Barbara Kreamer over the incumbent Roy Dyson, who doesn't want to fight wars himself but is eager to send other people's sons and daughters to do so. On the Republican side there, we favor Wayne T. Gilchrest, who almost won the seat two years ago.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - There's a scene in Michael Moore's controversial documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 in which the filmmaker mischievously confronts congressmen on Capitol Hill with Army enlistment pamphlets, suggesting they give them to their sons to encourage them to fight in Iraq. It's a classically provocative Moore gambit that touches on the sentiment of some antiwar demonstrators that if those who have backed the war had to face sacrifice in their own families, they might not be so supportive.
NEWS
May 29, 2004
Question of the month With the war in Iraq into its second year, some politicians have suggested reviving the draft to boost military manpower and distribute military service more equitably. Would you favor reinstituting a military draft? Does the war on terror demand new draft? The Sun's Question of the Month is one I have thought about since the day my son was born some 15 years ago. I was in college during the height of the Vietnam War. I remember waiting with a small group of friends in the school cafeteria as the draft numbers were called.
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