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By Paul Delaney and By Paul Delaney,Special to the Sun | April 16, 2000
"The Devil and Sonny Liston," by Nick Tosches. Little, Brown & Co. 272 pages. $24.95. One of the most interesting aspects of race in America is that it has always allowed convenient judgment: White, good. Black, bad. Boxing probably was the only profession that could get away with institutionalizing that proposition with impunity. With his latest book, Nick Tosches offers further confirmation in the tragic life, and death, of Sonny Liston. After Jack Johnson became the first black heavyweight champion, the boxing industry was in perennial search for a "white hope."
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NEWS
By Paul Clancy and Paul Clancy,THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT | August 4, 2002
NORFOLK, Va. - At night on the Atlantic, a pumpkin half-moon casts the ribs of a giant crane in silhouette as the barge it rests on rocks with the rhythms of the Gulf Stream. Sixteen miles off Cape Hatteras, calm and clear. The salvage barge Wotan seems a living creature, 300 feet long. Generators constantly hum, TV monitors glow, loudspeakers carry the rasping sounds of breathing: ahh, hahh, ahh, hahh. On deck is a small city, with sleeping quarters that look like condos three stories high, connected by stairways and catwalks.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1995
Family relationships get some scrutiny in several shows tonight, from conventional blood kinships to the artificial kind spliced together for network ratings. And one of the best PBS "Mystery!" sequences of recent years is back for a rerun.* "ABC Afterschool Special: Long Road Home" (4 p.m.-5 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Family stress and displacement are the issues, as a 16-year-old boy (Micah Dyer) meets his new stepmother (Kristen Cloke) and is shocked to learn she's just 28. They share a car trip of discovery from Los Angeles to Denver to join his father (Jameson Parker)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Delaney and By Paul Delaney,Special to the Sun | April 16, 2000
"The Devil and Sonny Liston," by Nick Tosches. Little, Brown & Co. 272 pages. $24.95. One of the most interesting aspects of race in America is that it has always allowed convenient judgment: White, good. Black, bad. Boxing probably was the only profession that could get away with institutionalizing that proposition with impunity. With his latest book, Nick Tosches offers further confirmation in the tragic life, and death, of Sonny Liston. After Jack Johnson became the first black heavyweight champion, the boxing industry was in perennial search for a "white hope."
SPORTS
June 5, 1991
Ali goes back to the woods"It's just like old times," said 49-year-old Muhammad Ali, in the whisper that often passes for his voice. "Like the old days."Yesterday, Ali, who suffers from Parkinson's syndrome, took a stroll down memory lane as he and some former confidants, along with media members, went to Deer Lake, Pa., his former training camp."I think this helps him a lot, really lifts his spirits," said Wali Muhammad, one of Ali's trainers for two decades. "I'm glad for him. It brings back a lot of good memories for all of us."
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
"King of the World," by David Remnick. Random House. 326 pages. $25.On the night of Feb. 25, 1964, in a boxing ring in Miami Beach, one of the most compelling and complicated figures of the 20th century arrived with the whomp of an uppercut.Today, of course, Muhammad Ali is mostly beloved, a heroic icon, an athletic statesman and worldwide ambassador, best remembered in recent years for lighting the torch to begin the 1996 Olympic games in Atlanta, his hands trembling from Parkinson's disease, the proud warrior refusing to let age or disease defeat him. The world cheered.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | May 25, 1995
The Baltimore Football Club and Channel 54 have hooked up on a deal for local telecasts of six, or possibly seven, games this season.WNUV will air a package of all road contests, beginning with the June 24 exhibition game in Miami against Birmingham, as well as a one-hour season preview special, and a possible weekly half-hour coach's show."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 31, 1997
It was 30 years ago this year that the Beatles gave us reason to cheer.I could have let 1997 slip by without paying homage to the 30th anniversary of the Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" album, but I feared John Lennon's ghost would have haunted me forever. Here, then, is a tribute to the most extraordinary album of perhaps the most extraordinary music group of all time.I didn't hear "Sgt. Pepper" until two years after the album hit the charts. I graduated from Baltimore City College in 1969 - rumor had it my departure was more in the nature of a parole - and took a job in the mail room at the Johns Hopkins University's Milton S. Eisenhower Library.
NEWS
By Paul Clancy and Paul Clancy,THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT | August 4, 2002
NORFOLK, Va. - At night on the Atlantic, a pumpkin half-moon casts the ribs of a giant crane in silhouette as the barge it rests on rocks with the rhythms of the Gulf Stream. Sixteen miles off Cape Hatteras, calm and clear. The salvage barge Wotan seems a living creature, 300 feet long. Generators constantly hum, TV monitors glow, loudspeakers carry the rasping sounds of breathing: ahh, hahh, ahh, hahh. On deck is a small city, with sleeping quarters that look like condos three stories high, connected by stairways and catwalks.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | May 24, 1995
The man didn't bother to raise his head during the introduction. Intimidation. The greeting, "Hello, Charles," was answered with a "Don't call me that.""How about Charlie then?" I inquired, attempting to lighten the moment. Sonny Liston finally looked up and said, "Don't like that either. Whatcha want?"It will be 30 years tomorrow that Liston and Muhammad Ali met in one of boxing's most infamous and bizarre bouts, which is saying a whole lot, considering. To mark the occasion, Home Box Office is running one of its always-classy specials.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
"King of the World," by David Remnick. Random House. 326 pages. $25.On the night of Feb. 25, 1964, in a boxing ring in Miami Beach, one of the most compelling and complicated figures of the 20th century arrived with the whomp of an uppercut.Today, of course, Muhammad Ali is mostly beloved, a heroic icon, an athletic statesman and worldwide ambassador, best remembered in recent years for lighting the torch to begin the 1996 Olympic games in Atlanta, his hands trembling from Parkinson's disease, the proud warrior refusing to let age or disease defeat him. The world cheered.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 31, 1997
It was 30 years ago this year that the Beatles gave us reason to cheer.I could have let 1997 slip by without paying homage to the 30th anniversary of the Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" album, but I feared John Lennon's ghost would have haunted me forever. Here, then, is a tribute to the most extraordinary album of perhaps the most extraordinary music group of all time.I didn't hear "Sgt. Pepper" until two years after the album hit the charts. I graduated from Baltimore City College in 1969 - rumor had it my departure was more in the nature of a parole - and took a job in the mail room at the Johns Hopkins University's Milton S. Eisenhower Library.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 13, 1996
On Sunday, I awoke to the joyful news that the Good Knight, Sir Evander of the Holyfield, had the previous evening vanquished by technical knockout that mean, nasty scamboogah of a Bad Knight, Sir Mike of the Tyson.Oh, happy day!As a rule, I try not to make morality plays of prizefights. It's a sordid business with all sorts of sordid characters. But there's an exception to every rule. The Tyson-Holyfield fight was not so much a triumph of good over evil as it was of class and dignity over the lack thereof.
SPORTS
By ALAN GOLDSTEIN and ALAN GOLDSTEIN,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- It has been 36 years since a relatively unknown Swedish boxer named Ingemar Johansson stunned the boxing world by knocking down champion Floyd Patterson seven times on the way to winning the world heavyweight championship.That was the first of their three title encounters, with Patterson winning the last two fights. Now good friends, who see each other at least twice a year, Johansson and Patterson yesterday recounted the days they monopolized the heavyweight crown while sharing the dais with ring legends Archie Moore, Carmen Basilio, Gene Fullmer and Kid Gavilan at the annual "Fight For Children" charity boxing show.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | May 25, 1995
The Baltimore Football Club and Channel 54 have hooked up on a deal for local telecasts of six, or possibly seven, games this season.WNUV will air a package of all road contests, beginning with the June 24 exhibition game in Miami against Birmingham, as well as a one-hour season preview special, and a possible weekly half-hour coach's show."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1995
Family relationships get some scrutiny in several shows tonight, from conventional blood kinships to the artificial kind spliced together for network ratings. And one of the best PBS "Mystery!" sequences of recent years is back for a rerun.* "ABC Afterschool Special: Long Road Home" (4 p.m.-5 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Family stress and displacement are the issues, as a 16-year-old boy (Micah Dyer) meets his new stepmother (Kristen Cloke) and is shocked to learn she's just 28. They share a car trip of discovery from Los Angeles to Denver to join his father (Jameson Parker)
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 13, 1996
On Sunday, I awoke to the joyful news that the Good Knight, Sir Evander of the Holyfield, had the previous evening vanquished by technical knockout that mean, nasty scamboogah of a Bad Knight, Sir Mike of the Tyson.Oh, happy day!As a rule, I try not to make morality plays of prizefights. It's a sordid business with all sorts of sordid characters. But there's an exception to every rule. The Tyson-Holyfield fight was not so much a triumph of good over evil as it was of class and dignity over the lack thereof.
SPORTS
By ALAN GOLDSTEIN and ALAN GOLDSTEIN,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- It has been 36 years since a relatively unknown Swedish boxer named Ingemar Johansson stunned the boxing world by knocking down champion Floyd Patterson seven times on the way to winning the world heavyweight championship.That was the first of their three title encounters, with Patterson winning the last two fights. Now good friends, who see each other at least twice a year, Johansson and Patterson yesterday recounted the days they monopolized the heavyweight crown while sharing the dais with ring legends Archie Moore, Carmen Basilio, Gene Fullmer and Kid Gavilan at the annual "Fight For Children" charity boxing show.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | May 24, 1995
The man didn't bother to raise his head during the introduction. Intimidation. The greeting, "Hello, Charles," was answered with a "Don't call me that.""How about Charlie then?" I inquired, attempting to lighten the moment. Sonny Liston finally looked up and said, "Don't like that either. Whatcha want?"It will be 30 years tomorrow that Liston and Muhammad Ali met in one of boxing's most infamous and bizarre bouts, which is saying a whole lot, considering. To mark the occasion, Home Box Office is running one of its always-classy specials.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | December 23, 1994
The TV Repairman:For some reason, known only to them, the folks at "Inside Stuff" are scooping themselves tomorrow (noon, Channel 2) by providing a sneak preview of the special "NBA Below The Rim: The Little Big Men," which will run Sunday as part of NBC's six-hour (3-9 p.m.) NBA Christmas doubleheader. The Sonics will play the Nuggets at 4 p.m., the Knicks and Bulls going at 6:30 as the network finally recognizes one of its prized possessions.As opposed to a few years ago when Christmas was treated with respect, devotion and solemnity, the telly going virtually dark as far as sports were concerned, there's an all-star game and a bowl among the collegians, three figure skating shows, an NFL game, golf, enough Washington International Horse Show segments to make even the horsey set head for the barn, swamp buggy racing, volleyball, arm-wrestling and the BASS Masters Classic, taped July 28-30.
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