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By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing Writer | July 22, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Local writers and musicians will join together from 6 p.m. to midnight Saturday at the Carroll County Farm Museum for an evening of "Sonnets and Strings."The event, sponsored by the Carroll County Arts Council, will feature the creative talents of area poets, writers and musicians who enjoy sharing their talents with an appreciative audience.The collaboration of "Sonnets and Strings" was initiated by members of the Carroll County Poetry Society."We wanted to get people together, and we batted around a number of ideas," said Stephen Johnston, a member of the group performing Saturday evening.
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NEWS
April 26, 2013
Sunday, April 28 Shakespeare A commemoration of the life and works of William Shakespeare will be presented at 2:30 p.m. at the Hampton Inn and Suites, 7045 Minstrel Way in Columbia. Event commemorates the 397th anniversary of Shakespeare's death and will feature actors from Studio-Boh, an acting/film/photography studio located in Baltimore, in a program of Sonnets and Soliloquies by Shakespeare. Program also includes a dramatic reading of George Bernard Shaw's "The Dark Lady of the Sonnets," a comic one-act interlude about Shakespeare and his mysterious "Dark Lady.
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NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 1, 2001
NEW YORK - When terrorist attacks damaged his downtown Manhattan office on Sept. 11, Eugene Schlanger responded like the rest of Wall Street: He went home, spent a few days with his family, then tried his best to get back to work at temporary quarters in Midtown. And somewhere along the way, he started a sonnet cycle. Schlanger is a deputy general counsel at Nomura Securities, one of the world's largest trading houses, and the chairman of the National Association of Securities' Dealers Committee of Greater New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | April 2, 2009
In Ages of Man, actor Marc Horwitz provides audiences with a new definition of tough. Horwitz might not chase criminals for a living or enter burning houses to rescue trapped children. All he has to do is stand on stage by himself and talk to people who aren't there. He just has to deliver 110 minutes of sonnets and Shakespearean dialogue while shifting between two dozen roles. He merely must act his heart out inches from a room full of blank-eyed, arms-crossed, foot-jiggling theatergoers who can see every drop of sweat trickling down his face.
FEATURES
By Sun's Dead Poets Society | April 4, 1996
Poetry and football. How could we not have seen the symbiotic connection between the two? But now that we do, a terrible beauty is born (Yeats), it sits looking over the harbor and city on silent haunches (Sandburg) and all losses are restor'd and sorrows end (Shakespeare).But, you say, you don't like the Ravens as a team name? It could have been worse. Imagine if another poet had lived or died in Baltimore. Think of all the sportswriters' cliches that might have been, all the sponsor chances lost.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | April 2, 2009
In Ages of Man, actor Marc Horwitz provides audiences with a new definition of tough. Horwitz might not chase criminals for a living or enter burning houses to rescue trapped children. All he has to do is stand on stage by himself and talk to people who aren't there. He just has to deliver 110 minutes of sonnets and Shakespearean dialogue while shifting between two dozen roles. He merely must act his heart out inches from a room full of blank-eyed, arms-crossed, foot-jiggling theatergoers who can see every drop of sweat trickling down his face.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | November 27, 1993
Without their briefcases, yellow pads or file folders, without even their shoes, the five lawyers stretch out on the carpeted floor and breathe deeply. They exhale in a droning hum and for a moment the conference room in this prestigious Baltimore law office sounds like a Buddhist temple.This is just the warm-up. Before the night is over, the attorneys will recite Shakespeare sonnets, perform mime and talk in gibberish. They will work on opening trial arguments as an actor might prepare for a scene.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
Sunday, April 28 Shakespeare A commemoration of the life and works of William Shakespeare will be presented at 2:30 p.m. at the Hampton Inn and Suites, 7045 Minstrel Way in Columbia. Event commemorates the 397th anniversary of Shakespeare's death and will feature actors from Studio-Boh, an acting/film/photography studio located in Baltimore, in a program of Sonnets and Soliloquies by Shakespeare. Program also includes a dramatic reading of George Bernard Shaw's "The Dark Lady of the Sonnets," a comic one-act interlude about Shakespeare and his mysterious "Dark Lady.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1996
The attribution to William Shakespeare of an obscure, rambling, disorganized Elizabethan elegy on the basis of a computer study of word choice made front page news in January. So the controversy is being taken seriously -- more so than the poem itself deserves.And the attribution, made by Vassar College Professor Donald Foster, is sure to be the source of more contention when the World Shakespeare Congress holds its annual meeting, beginning Thursday, in Los Angeles.In seeking to prove that this obscure 17th-century funeral elegy was written by Shakespeare, Mr. Foster seems to have missed one critical step.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | February 8, 1996
HAVRE De GRACE -- Baltimore officials are shocked, shocked to discover that some of the city employees responsible for municipal housing inspections are themselves slumlords, owners of rental properties that don't measure up to the housing code.Nobody else is surprised at this news. It's assumed by most real-world people, whether they live in the city or outside it, that the Baltimore government is a swamp of ineptitude and petty corruption, and that its programs concerned with housing are probably the worst of all. New disclosures confirming this assumption are usually met with either a yawn or a sigh.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 30, 2006
Kendel Ehrlich, Democrat-turned-Republican, wore a black, broad-brimmed number. Frances Glendening, Republican-turned-Democrat, went hatless. And Nancy Grasmick, the Democratic pal of Maryland's GOP governor, showed off her legendary ability to straddle the fence: She plopped a jockey's helmet on her head just as she stepped up to the podium at Pimlico, then whipped it off before it could smush her poofy blond 'do. "I do have a hat," she told the crowd....
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 1, 2001
NEW YORK - When terrorist attacks damaged his downtown Manhattan office on Sept. 11, Eugene Schlanger responded like the rest of Wall Street: He went home, spent a few days with his family, then tried his best to get back to work at temporary quarters in Midtown. And somewhere along the way, he started a sonnet cycle. Schlanger is a deputy general counsel at Nomura Securities, one of the world's largest trading houses, and the chairman of the National Association of Securities' Dealers Committee of Greater New York.
NEWS
By Isaac Rehert and Isaac Rehert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 4, 2000
Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door! Millions of people are familiar with these words and their association with the Statue of Liberty - their proclamation that America is the haven for the oppressed and the freedom-seeking. The 305-foot-high copper statue of the woman holding aloft the beacon of freedom over New York harbor has become the material symbol of liberty through much of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the Sun | January 10, 1999
It all started with a cup of coffee.In 1997, Andrew Sonnet was new to the Baltimore area. A consultant for Larson-Juhl, a national frame and artwork supplier, Andrew was determined to make a life here. And to find a place that served a good cup of coffee.Though Andrew was living in Columbia at the time, his quest for java took him all the way to Canton. There, at the Needful Things coffee shop, he found a drink that met his approval -- and a place where he felt at home.On June 22, 1997 -- the date is etched indelibly in his memory, he says -- Andrew went to the shop for breakfast.
NEWS
July 31, 1998
This editorial appeared in Wednesday's Los Angeles Times:On the congested, narrow streets of Bogota, Colombia, the buses are slow and the smog can be stinging.But the introduction of a bit of culture, Latin-style, now promises to ease the commuter's weary way on municipal buses.Many buses will have their own poets. The city Institute of Culture and Tourism has hired 15 poets to declaim the classics to Bogotanos bouncing to work."Our aim," said the manager of the institute, "is to pass on a cultural message to the people, and, who knows, perhaps some of the patrons will leave the bus having learned a new poem."
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | November 30, 1997
Three minutes of patience, please. Shakespeare, who lived PTC from 1564 to 1616, wrote a total of 154 sonnets. A sonnet, every literate schoolchild knows, is a flexibly rigid form, always 14 lines long, of ancient origin.In English, there are 10 syllables in each line (the wordy Italians like 11 and the unspeakably verbose French prefer 12). Each sonnet usually is in four quatrains and one couplet, which is to say, three four-line bits followed by a pair of lines.Rhyme schemes are formal, though there are several models.
NEWS
July 31, 1998
This editorial appeared in Wednesday's Los Angeles Times:On the congested, narrow streets of Bogota, Colombia, the buses are slow and the smog can be stinging.But the introduction of a bit of culture, Latin-style, now promises to ease the commuter's weary way on municipal buses.Many buses will have their own poets. The city Institute of Culture and Tourism has hired 15 poets to declaim the classics to Bogotanos bouncing to work."Our aim," said the manager of the institute, "is to pass on a cultural message to the people, and, who knows, perhaps some of the patrons will leave the bus having learned a new poem."
NEWS
By Tim Baker | April 5, 1993
Remember that first time, when your brown eyesLooked up, longing, into my) into yours? Big and blue?No. As I recall, you looked down, tongue-tied,Enraptured, into mine.You misconstrue.You know you started staring first.Why mustWe search for romance there?# In love, courtshipsEntice our eyes with eyes.% You'd think that lustWould rather leer at loins or limbs or lips.2& Romantic eyes will reconnoiter, goAs scouts in search of what would please our hearts.fire our hearts!Inflame our passions!
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1996
The attribution to William Shakespeare of an obscure, rambling, disorganized Elizabethan elegy on the basis of a computer study of word choice made front page news in January. So the controversy is being taken seriously -- more so than the poem itself deserves.And the attribution, made by Vassar College Professor Donald Foster, is sure to be the source of more contention when the World Shakespeare Congress holds its annual meeting, beginning Thursday, in Los Angeles.In seeking to prove that this obscure 17th-century funeral elegy was written by Shakespeare, Mr. Foster seems to have missed one critical step.
FEATURES
By Sun's Dead Poets Society | April 4, 1996
Poetry and football. How could we not have seen the symbiotic connection between the two? But now that we do, a terrible beauty is born (Yeats), it sits looking over the harbor and city on silent haunches (Sandburg) and all losses are restor'd and sorrows end (Shakespeare).But, you say, you don't like the Ravens as a team name? It could have been worse. Imagine if another poet had lived or died in Baltimore. Think of all the sportswriters' cliches that might have been, all the sponsor chances lost.
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