Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSonja Sohn
IN THE NEWS

Sonja Sohn

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
Like the television character he helped inspire, Donnie Andrews lived by a code. In his earlier years when he was robbing rival dealers as a young hustler in West Baltimore - experiences that would later form the basis for the popular Omar Little character on the Baltimore crime drama “The Wire” - he vowed to never involve women or children in his crimes. But after confessing to a murder and helping authorities bring down a crime syndicate, he took on a different mission: working to prevent youth from going down the same path that he did. Andrews died Thursday following heart complications while in New York City, where he was attending an event as part of his efforts to promote a non-profit outreach foundation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather Mizeur picked up her first endorsement from a Baltimore elected official Monday as veteran City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke gave her blessing to the Montgomery County delegate's insurgent campaign. Clarke, a longtime fixture in Baltimore politics, hailed Mizeur as an "exciting choice" in a 2014 gubernatorial race that also includes the better-known Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler. A onetime candidate for mayor, Clarke first served on the City Council in 1975 and was its president from 1987 to 1995.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2009
The issue may have been serious: raising awareness of problems facing Maryland's film industry. But, that didn't mean that an event for that cause couldn't be fun. All you needed to see were the smiles on the faces of folks like: Betsy Jiranek, American Land Title Corp. president, and her husband, Drew Jiranek, Jiranek Co. principal; Lorraine Whittlesey, Private Sector Productions artistic director; Ann Stief, Bryn Mawr teacher, and her husband, Charlie Stief, Wells Fargo senior vice president; and Judy Turner, retired Verizon analyst.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
Like the television character he helped inspire, Donnie Andrews lived by a code. In his earlier years when he was robbing rival dealers as a young hustler in West Baltimore - experiences that would later form the basis for the popular Omar Little character on the Baltimore crime drama “The Wire” - he vowed to never involve women or children in his crimes. But after confessing to a murder and helping authorities bring down a crime syndicate, he took on a different mission: working to prevent youth from going down the same path that he did. Andrews died Thursday following heart complications while in New York City, where he was attending an event as part of his efforts to promote a non-profit outreach foundation.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather Mizeur picked up her first endorsement from a Baltimore elected official Monday as veteran City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke gave her blessing to the Montgomery County delegate's insurgent campaign. Clarke, a longtime fixture in Baltimore politics, hailed Mizeur as an "exciting choice" in a 2014 gubernatorial race that also includes the better-known Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler. A onetime candidate for mayor, Clarke first served on the City Council in 1975 and was its president from 1987 to 1995.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | November 5, 2006
THE MARTIN'S WEST BALLROOM WAS PACKED, BUT this wasn't your usual party crowd. Forget the swish of ball gowns and flowery centerpieces decorating the dinner tables. It was another centerpiece that these folks were centered on: the boxing ring set up in the middle of the room. This was "An Evening Ringside" -- cocktails, dinner and six bouts of professional boxing. The night's proceeds would go to The Jonathan Ogden Foundation, which helps city school students use sports to improve academically.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Sloane@Sloanebrownbaltsun.com | May 31, 2009
Raising money for the Hampden Family Center is no day at the beach, but it comes close. More than a hundred folks in chic summery togs gathered at the Clipper Mill Pool Pavilion for the Center's 2009 Flamingo Fling. A bit of South Beach infused the air. A DJ on a platform above the pool set the mood. Pink, yellow and orange was everywhere, including the inflatable balls floating in the pool. And guests sipped pink cocktails from martini glasses that featured flamingos as their stems. Event committee member Pam Malester pointed to the tiki torches poolside.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 2004
B-more's buzzing with celebrity scoops this week. Let's start with the big Tony Bennett shebang at the Meyerhoff last weekend, which benefited the Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins. Center administrative director Kathryn Davis says everything about the evening was fantastic, filled with great energy. A lot of that had to do with the legendary crooner himself. "Tony loves singing at the Meyerhoff," Kathryn explains, "because he considers it one of the best concert halls acoustically."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | September 8, 2009
For five seasons, Sonja Sohn played Detective Kima Greggs on HBO's "The Wire," the gritty Baltimore crime drama. It was a breakthrough role for Sohn, who came from a troubled upbringing in Virginia and went from poet to actress. But on a recent weeknight, Sohn was not on a Hollywood film set. She was at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, speaking on a cell phone to the facilitator of a GED program, trying to figure out why 21-year-old Sean Hawkins hasn't been attending. She sat Hawkins down and crouched at his feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | July 30, 2009
The last shirt Stringer Bell ever wore. Detective Jimmy McNulty's gun. Avon Barksdale's prison jumpsuit. For more than a year, those and about 150 other pieces of The Wire, the extended HBO morality play that spent five seasons exploring Charm City's meaner streets, have been on display at the Baltimore Museum of Industry. But just as the HBO show ended in March 2008, the BMI exhibit has reached the end of its run. What better excuse for a party? "Disconnecting The Wire ... What's Next?"
NEWS
Lionel Foster | October 11, 2012
"Holy crap. What was I thinking when I decided to take this on?" That's what Sonja Sohn said last week shortly after I joined her at a coffee shop. Fortunately, she wasn't having second thoughts about our interview but wondering how to handle a mishap with a printer that might hamper the promotion of a volunteer event she was planning now that the battery on her laptop was dead. Her phone soon followed suit. Ms. Sohn is better known to some as Shakima Greggs, a detective from the HBO series "The Wire," a five-season indictment of America's war on drugs that examined poverty, political corruption and structural racism from the back alley to the penthouse in minute detail and made Baltimore more infamous than it already was. If "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey" had been set in an American city, they could hardly have been more dramatic.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | September 8, 2009
For five seasons, Sonja Sohn played Detective Kima Greggs on HBO's "The Wire," the gritty Baltimore crime drama. It was a breakthrough role for Sohn, who came from a troubled upbringing in Virginia and went from poet to actress. But on a recent weeknight, Sohn was not on a Hollywood film set. She was at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, speaking on a cell phone to the facilitator of a GED program, trying to figure out why 21-year-old Sean Hawkins hasn't been attending. She sat Hawkins down and crouched at his feet.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2009
The issue may have been serious: raising awareness of problems facing Maryland's film industry. But, that didn't mean that an event for that cause couldn't be fun. All you needed to see were the smiles on the faces of folks like: Betsy Jiranek, American Land Title Corp. president, and her husband, Drew Jiranek, Jiranek Co. principal; Lorraine Whittlesey, Private Sector Productions artistic director; Ann Stief, Bryn Mawr teacher, and her husband, Charlie Stief, Wells Fargo senior vice president; and Judy Turner, retired Verizon analyst.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | July 30, 2009
The last shirt Stringer Bell ever wore. Detective Jimmy McNulty's gun. Avon Barksdale's prison jumpsuit. For more than a year, those and about 150 other pieces of The Wire, the extended HBO morality play that spent five seasons exploring Charm City's meaner streets, have been on display at the Baltimore Museum of Industry. But just as the HBO show ended in March 2008, the BMI exhibit has reached the end of its run. What better excuse for a party? "Disconnecting The Wire ... What's Next?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Sloane@Sloanebrownbaltsun.com | May 31, 2009
Raising money for the Hampden Family Center is no day at the beach, but it comes close. More than a hundred folks in chic summery togs gathered at the Clipper Mill Pool Pavilion for the Center's 2009 Flamingo Fling. A bit of South Beach infused the air. A DJ on a platform above the pool set the mood. Pink, yellow and orange was everywhere, including the inflatable balls floating in the pool. And guests sipped pink cocktails from martini glasses that featured flamingos as their stems. Event committee member Pam Malester pointed to the tiki torches poolside.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | November 5, 2006
THE MARTIN'S WEST BALLROOM WAS PACKED, BUT this wasn't your usual party crowd. Forget the swish of ball gowns and flowery centerpieces decorating the dinner tables. It was another centerpiece that these folks were centered on: the boxing ring set up in the middle of the room. This was "An Evening Ringside" -- cocktails, dinner and six bouts of professional boxing. The night's proceeds would go to The Jonathan Ogden Foundation, which helps city school students use sports to improve academically.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | October 11, 2012
"Holy crap. What was I thinking when I decided to take this on?" That's what Sonja Sohn said last week shortly after I joined her at a coffee shop. Fortunately, she wasn't having second thoughts about our interview but wondering how to handle a mishap with a printer that might hamper the promotion of a volunteer event she was planning now that the battery on her laptop was dead. Her phone soon followed suit. Ms. Sohn is better known to some as Shakima Greggs, a detective from the HBO series "The Wire," a five-season indictment of America's war on drugs that examined poverty, political corruption and structural racism from the back alley to the penthouse in minute detail and made Baltimore more infamous than it already was. If "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey" had been set in an American city, they could hardly have been more dramatic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and By Luke Broadwater | May 31, 2011
The Obama administration has some very pressing matters on its hands: Three overseas wars, an economy struggling to recover and a massive budget shortfall.  So, what are administration officials spending their time doing? Why, ordering more episodes of "The Wire," of course.  Earlier today, Attorney General Eric Holder met with three of the show's actors -- Wendell Pierce (“Bunk”), Sonja Sohn (“Kima”) and Jim True-Frost (“Prez”) -- as part of a forum about preventing child abuse.  But, according to Reuters , Holder couldn't resist issuing an order to the Baltimore-based show's writers, David Simon and Ed Burns, for more content:  “I want to speak directly to Mr. Burns and Mr. Simon: Do another season of 'The Wire',” Holder said, drawing laughter and applause from the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 2004
B-more's buzzing with celebrity scoops this week. Let's start with the big Tony Bennett shebang at the Meyerhoff last weekend, which benefited the Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins. Center administrative director Kathryn Davis says everything about the evening was fantastic, filled with great energy. A lot of that had to do with the legendary crooner himself. "Tony loves singing at the Meyerhoff," Kathryn explains, "because he considers it one of the best concert halls acoustically."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.