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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 22, 1991
Sonic YouthWhen: Wednesday, Feb. 27, 8 p.m.Where: Capital CentreTickets: $22.50Call: 481-6000 for tickets, 792-7490 for informationIn theory, at least, Sonic Youth has quite a lot in common with Neil Young. Both are beloved by rock critics. Both operate on the fringes of mainstream rock. And both like to crank their guitar amps as high as they'll go.But one thing these two bands don't have in common is an audience. Which is why, as the Youth open for Young in arena after arena, the group keeps getting the same reaction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | June 15, 2006
Sometimes you have to revisit the roots to appreciate the fruits. With their new album and tour, the members of Sonic Youth are doing just that. The CD, Rather Ripped, landed in stores Tuesday, and it "encapsulates everything we've done up to this point," says bassist-vocalist Kim Gordon, who's calling from her western Massachusetts home. Sonic Youth plays the 9:30 Club tonight. "The album is what we felt like playing. We didn't belabor it." To support Rather Ripped, the experimental rock band kicked off its two-month summer tour this week at New York's legendary punk venue, CBGBs, the place where it all gelled for the group back in the early '80s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 28, 1995
Sonic Youth may be at the top of the bill for Lollapalooza '95, but you wouldn't know it from the press coverage.Whether you go by the photos, the headlines or the gossip column items, it's easy to get the impression that Hole singer Courtney Love is the tour's big star. She has held the limelight so relentlessly that it wasn't until a pregnant Sinead O'Connor dropped off the tour that any other Lollapalooza star made national news. Even when Jesus Lizard singer David Yow was arrested after exposed himself to protest censorship in Cincinnati, it was noted that Love also flashed the crowd -- and was not arrested.
NEWS
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
HILARY HAHN REMEMBERS THE long-ago concert at Zion Lutheran Church the way you might recall details of your first big day at school: It was her maiden voyage to the Planet of Public Performance. She was 6 years old. And she had a fever of 102. "I thought I might as well go on and play the concert, and when I finished, the fever was gone," she recalls. "That was the first time I realized that when adrenaline kicks in, it can start the healing process and help you recover faster." She also discovered, as she was playing, that her eyes instinctively sought out the bow area of her instrument -- the place that would become her concert focal point.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 24, 1992
DIRTYSonic Youth (DGC 24485)Anyone who thinks Ross Perot's candidacy represented the full range of political disaffection in America today obviously hasn't been listening to Sonic Youth's new album, "Dirty." It isn't just that its songs are angry and edgy, topping dense squalls of guitar noise with snarling, in-your-face lyrics; the real power here stems from the Youth's steely determination, a not-gonna-take-it insistence that adds realism and resonance to every track. And that's as true of the searing social commentary on "Swimsuit Issue" (about sexual harassment)
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 10, 1994
Nobody has ever accused Sonic Youth of being easy on its listeners.From its early existence as a noise-obsessed art band to its current reign as the grand pooh-bahs of American punk, the band has reveled in dissonance and distortion, profanity and outrage. Not even its move to the majors in 1990 softened the band's sound or aesthetic; not only were "Goo" and "Dirty" just as abrasive and provocative as their predecessors, but (at the band's insistence) neither sported a parental guidance sticker.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | June 15, 2006
Sometimes you have to revisit the roots to appreciate the fruits. With their new album and tour, the members of Sonic Youth are doing just that. The CD, Rather Ripped, landed in stores Tuesday, and it "encapsulates everything we've done up to this point," says bassist-vocalist Kim Gordon, who's calling from her western Massachusetts home. Sonic Youth plays the 9:30 Club tonight. "The album is what we felt like playing. We didn't belabor it." To support Rather Ripped, the experimental rock band kicked off its two-month summer tour this week at New York's legendary punk venue, CBGBs, the place where it all gelled for the group back in the early '80s.
NEWS
May 11, 1994
In yesterday's Today section, an incorrect Sundial telephone number was listed for Anne Arundel readers to call to hear the new recordings of Indigo Girls and Sonic Youth. The correct number is 268-7736.The Sun regrets the errors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | February 20, 1997
Dangerous GroundMusic from the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (Jive 41590)Contrary to the line in Ice Cube's "The World Is Mine," in which Mack 10 insists that "you can't get enough of this gangsta [stuff]," the most addictive aspect of the soundtrack to "Dangerous Ground" isn't the tough-talking gangsta raps, but the deep-thumping bass grooves. That's certainly the case with "The World Is Mine," where the growling synth hook is nastier than anything Cube says, but it's just as true of both the simmering malevolence of Spice 1's "2 Hands and a Razor" and the slippery funk of Celly Cel's "The Only Way."
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 28, 1991
Largo -- Anyone who remembers Spinal Tap guitarist Nigel Tufnel and his amplifiers that went up to 11 ("It's One Louder Than Ten" he'd explain) would have appreciated the look and sound of Neil Young's show at the Capital Centre last night. It wasn't just that Young had decked the stage with towering amps, including a pair of Fender Bassman cabinets 12 feet high; he also made sure his massive props were accompanied by an equally outsized sound.From the moment he and his backing band, Crazy Horse, hit the stage, the audience was awash in electric thunder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | February 20, 1997
Dangerous GroundMusic from the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (Jive 41590)Contrary to the line in Ice Cube's "The World Is Mine," in which Mack 10 insists that "you can't get enough of this gangsta [stuff]," the most addictive aspect of the soundtrack to "Dangerous Ground" isn't the tough-talking gangsta raps, but the deep-thumping bass grooves. That's certainly the case with "The World Is Mine," where the growling synth hook is nastier than anything Cube says, but it's just as true of both the simmering malevolence of Spice 1's "2 Hands and a Razor" and the slippery funk of Celly Cel's "The Only Way."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | October 19, 1995
InsomniacGreen Day (Reprise 46046)As anyone old enough to remember the Jam or the Buzzcocks could tell you, Green Day is hardly the most original punk rock combo to hit the radio, but it does have an impressive amount of pop savvy. After all, what put "Dookie" over the top wasn't that it articulated the angst and anomie of a generation; it was because the album's best songs were undeniably ear-catching and energetic. Unfortunately, that's not the case with "Insomniac." Although the band relies on the same basic sound as on "Dookie" -- crunchy, powerchord guitar, tuneful, surging bass lines and tough, English-style vocals -- it doesn't deploy those elements with anywhere near the same imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 28, 1995
Sonic Youth may be at the top of the bill for Lollapalooza '95, but you wouldn't know it from the press coverage.Whether you go by the photos, the headlines or the gossip column items, it's easy to get the impression that Hole singer Courtney Love is the tour's big star. She has held the limelight so relentlessly that it wasn't until a pregnant Sinead O'Connor dropped off the tour that any other Lollapalooza star made national news. Even when Jesus Lizard singer David Yow was arrested after exposed himself to protest censorship in Cincinnati, it was noted that Love also flashed the crowd -- and was not arrested.
FEATURES
By Craig Rosen and Craig Rosen,Billboard | August 14, 1994
With an extensive marketing plan and unlikely pairings of artists and source material, A&M Records will attempt to make "If I Were A Carpenter," its modern-rock homage to the brother-sister duo, stand out amid a flood of tribute albums.The album, due Sept. 13, features American Music Club, Babes In Toyland, Bettie Serveert, Cracker, the Cranberries, Sheryl Crow, new A&M act Dishwalla, 4 Non Blondes, Grant Lee Buffalo, Johnette Napolitano with Marc Moreland, Redd Kross, Shonen Knife, Sonic Youth and Matthew Sweet.
NEWS
May 11, 1994
In yesterday's Today section, an incorrect Sundial telephone number was listed for Anne Arundel readers to call to hear the new recordings of Indigo Girls and Sonic Youth. The correct number is 268-7736.The Sun regrets the errors.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 10, 1994
Nobody has ever accused Sonic Youth of being easy on its listeners.From its early existence as a noise-obsessed art band to its current reign as the grand pooh-bahs of American punk, the band has reveled in dissonance and distortion, profanity and outrage. Not even its move to the majors in 1990 softened the band's sound or aesthetic; not only were "Goo" and "Dirty" just as abrasive and provocative as their predecessors, but (at the band's insistence) neither sported a parental guidance sticker.
FEATURES
By Craig Rosen and Craig Rosen,Billboard | August 14, 1994
With an extensive marketing plan and unlikely pairings of artists and source material, A&M Records will attempt to make "If I Were A Carpenter," its modern-rock homage to the brother-sister duo, stand out amid a flood of tribute albums.The album, due Sept. 13, features American Music Club, Babes In Toyland, Bettie Serveert, Cracker, the Cranberries, Sheryl Crow, new A&M act Dishwalla, 4 Non Blondes, Grant Lee Buffalo, Johnette Napolitano with Marc Moreland, Redd Kross, Shonen Knife, Sonic Youth and Matthew Sweet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | October 19, 1995
InsomniacGreen Day (Reprise 46046)As anyone old enough to remember the Jam or the Buzzcocks could tell you, Green Day is hardly the most original punk rock combo to hit the radio, but it does have an impressive amount of pop savvy. After all, what put "Dookie" over the top wasn't that it articulated the angst and anomie of a generation; it was because the album's best songs were undeniably ear-catching and energetic. Unfortunately, that's not the case with "Insomniac." Although the band relies on the same basic sound as on "Dookie" -- crunchy, powerchord guitar, tuneful, surging bass lines and tough, English-style vocals -- it doesn't deploy those elements with anywhere near the same imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 24, 1992
DIRTYSonic Youth (DGC 24485)Anyone who thinks Ross Perot's candidacy represented the full range of political disaffection in America today obviously hasn't been listening to Sonic Youth's new album, "Dirty." It isn't just that its songs are angry and edgy, topping dense squalls of guitar noise with snarling, in-your-face lyrics; the real power here stems from the Youth's steely determination, a not-gonna-take-it insistence that adds realism and resonance to every track. And that's as true of the searing social commentary on "Swimsuit Issue" (about sexual harassment)
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 28, 1991
Largo -- Anyone who remembers Spinal Tap guitarist Nigel Tufnel and his amplifiers that went up to 11 ("It's One Louder Than Ten" he'd explain) would have appreciated the look and sound of Neil Young's show at the Capital Centre last night. It wasn't just that Young had decked the stage with towering amps, including a pair of Fender Bassman cabinets 12 feet high; he also made sure his massive props were accompanied by an equally outsized sound.From the moment he and his backing band, Crazy Horse, hit the stage, the audience was awash in electric thunder.
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