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Sonia Sotomayor

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NEWS
May 27, 2009
For weeks, it's been obvious Republicans would oppose whoever President Barack Obama picked to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice David Souter. Conservative commentators pounced on the president's use of the word "empathy" to describe one of the qualities he was looking for - as if an ability to put oneself in another person's shoes was somehow undesirable in a judge - and that same sort of reflexive hostility was on view again over the weekend, when a top Senate Republican threatened to filibuster Mr. Obama's choice without even knowing who it was. But with the nomination Tuesday of Sonia Sotomayor, a federal appeals court judge in New York who would become only the third woman and the first Hispanic ever to serve on the nation's highest court, we hope even the president's critics will give his candidate a fair hearing.
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NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,Tribune Newspapers | August 7, 2009
WASHINGTON - - Sonia Sotomayor completed an unlikely and historic journey Thursday, one that began with her birth in a Bronx, N.Y., housing project 55 years ago and culminated in her confirmation as the Supreme Court's 111th justice. When she is sworn into office Saturday, Sotomayor will take her place as the high court's first Latino and just its third woman. She was approved by a 68-31 Senate vote after three days of debate. Nine Republicans crossed party lines to support her. But what she brings to the high court goes far beyond her ethnicity or gender.
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NEWS
By David G. Savage and Christi Parsons and David G. Savage and Christi Parsons,Tribune Washington Bureau | May 27, 2009
WASHINGTON - - President Barack Obama decided Tuesday to send to the Supreme Court a veteran federal judge from New York whose humble upbringing and moderate-to-liberal record on the bench is not likely to trigger a "culture wars" battle in the Senate. Judge Sonia Sotomayor, 54, who would be the first Hispanic justice on the high court, has not ruled squarely on controversies such as abortion or gay rights, and legal experts say her narrowly written opinions resemble those of the justice she would replace, David Souter.
NEWS
By Penny Young Nance | August 6, 2009
The battles on Capitol Hill over Sonia Sotomayor and health care have convinced me that pro-life Americans should take a cue from a popular chick flick. A hit movie newly out on DVD recently proclaims a shocking truth to women who make excuses for the bad behavior of men they date. That fact is: If he lies, cheats and treats you disrespectfully, "he's just not that into you." The movie evokes cringes as one recognizes realistic scenes of bright women and men making humiliating mistakes and errors in judgment.
NEWS
May 27, 2009
The following is a selection of reader commentary from Baltimore Sun talkboards and blogs on President Barack Obama's nomination of Judge Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court. Don't get so agitated because the Republicans agitate about Sotomayor. That's their job. They are the opposition party. Would you like it better if they just curled up and died? You didn't mention that Sonia Sotomayor is also a diabetic from a young age. Hispanic, woman and diabetic! Rah, rah, rah! Is her empathy a cover for her ideology?
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | April 3, 1995
Donald Fehr -- Embattled union director lands on his feet and bolsters credibility with his membership. No salary cap. No tax plan (yet!). No significant players crossed the picket lines. Under the circumstances, it doesn't get any better than this.Peter Angelos -- Renegade Orioles owner became a baseball cult hero by refusing to use replacement players and calling every wrong-headed move by the owners in advance. Called ownership's hard-line bargaining approach "mass economic suicide." Nearly $900 million in revenue losses later, he turned out to be right.
NEWS
By Penny Young Nance | August 6, 2009
The battles on Capitol Hill over Sonia Sotomayor and health care have convinced me that pro-life Americans should take a cue from a popular chick flick. A hit movie newly out on DVD recently proclaims a shocking truth to women who make excuses for the bad behavior of men they date. That fact is: If he lies, cheats and treats you disrespectfully, "he's just not that into you." The movie evokes cringes as one recognizes realistic scenes of bright women and men making humiliating mistakes and errors in judgment.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | July 15, 2009
Doubtless, thousands of other women's ears perked up when Sen. Charles Schumer, introducing Sonia Sotomayor at Monday's confirmation hearing, mentioned the Latina jurist's girlhood affection for Nancy Drew books. The smart, plucky girl-detective was a role model for many women who recognized themselves in Nancy - including Hillary Clinton, Oprah, Sandra Day O'Connor and Laura Bush, to name a few. Add yours truly to the list. My father introduced to me to Nancy Drew when I was in the fifth grade.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | June 1, 2009
A few words about identity politics. That's the knock on Sonia Sotomayor, who was nominated to the Supreme Court last week by President Barack Obama. If confirmed, Ms. Sotomayor, who is Puerto Rican, will be the first Hispanic to sit on the nation's highest tribunal. That has traumatized some titans of the right. George Will, for instance, complains that "she embraces identity politics, including the idea of categorical representation: A person is what his or her race, ethnicity, gender or sexual preference is, and members of a particular category can be represented, understood, empathized with only by persons of the same identity."
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | March 31, 1995
This weekend. Immediately if not sooner. Now or never.That's the deadline, not simply to end this ridiculous strike, but to forge a new collective bargaining agreement.Let's not hear any talk about playing the 1995 season under the old economic rules and continuing negotiations toward a settlement.That is the worst possible solution.Think about it: A season that starts a month late, topped off by the threat of another strike.The lawyers would rejoice.And the game would be in ruins.How do you sell tickets for a season that is compromised to begin with, and might be aborted in August?
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | July 15, 2009
Doubtless, thousands of other women's ears perked up when Sen. Charles Schumer, introducing Sonia Sotomayor at Monday's confirmation hearing, mentioned the Latina jurist's girlhood affection for Nancy Drew books. The smart, plucky girl-detective was a role model for many women who recognized themselves in Nancy - including Hillary Clinton, Oprah, Sandra Day O'Connor and Laura Bush, to name a few. Add yours truly to the list. My father introduced to me to Nancy Drew when I was in the fifth grade.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and James Oliphant and David G. Savage and James Oliphant,Tribune Newspapers | July 13, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Sonia Sotomayor will go before a Senate committee starting today and will be pressed to answer a question that has lingered since President Barack Obama made her his first choice for the Supreme Court. Given a lifetime appointment, will she be a justice who views the law through a liberal lens because of her Latina heritage? In speeches, she said "gender and national origins ... will make a difference in our judging" and added that a "wise Latina" will "more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | June 1, 2009
A few words about identity politics. That's the knock on Sonia Sotomayor, who was nominated to the Supreme Court last week by President Barack Obama. If confirmed, Ms. Sotomayor, who is Puerto Rican, will be the first Hispanic to sit on the nation's highest tribunal. That has traumatized some titans of the right. George Will, for instance, complains that "she embraces identity politics, including the idea of categorical representation: A person is what his or her race, ethnicity, gender or sexual preference is, and members of a particular category can be represented, understood, empathized with only by persons of the same identity."
NEWS
May 27, 2009
For weeks, it's been obvious Republicans would oppose whoever President Barack Obama picked to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice David Souter. Conservative commentators pounced on the president's use of the word "empathy" to describe one of the qualities he was looking for - as if an ability to put oneself in another person's shoes was somehow undesirable in a judge - and that same sort of reflexive hostility was on view again over the weekend, when a top Senate Republican threatened to filibuster Mr. Obama's choice without even knowing who it was. But with the nomination Tuesday of Sonia Sotomayor, a federal appeals court judge in New York who would become only the third woman and the first Hispanic ever to serve on the nation's highest court, we hope even the president's critics will give his candidate a fair hearing.
NEWS
May 27, 2009
The following is a selection of reader commentary from Baltimore Sun talkboards and blogs on President Barack Obama's nomination of Judge Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court. Don't get so agitated because the Republicans agitate about Sotomayor. That's their job. They are the opposition party. Would you like it better if they just curled up and died? You didn't mention that Sonia Sotomayor is also a diabetic from a young age. Hispanic, woman and diabetic! Rah, rah, rah! Is her empathy a cover for her ideology?
NEWS
By David G. Savage and Christi Parsons and David G. Savage and Christi Parsons,Tribune Washington Bureau | May 27, 2009
WASHINGTON - - President Barack Obama decided Tuesday to send to the Supreme Court a veteran federal judge from New York whose humble upbringing and moderate-to-liberal record on the bench is not likely to trigger a "culture wars" battle in the Senate. Judge Sonia Sotomayor, 54, who would be the first Hispanic justice on the high court, has not ruled squarely on controversies such as abortion or gay rights, and legal experts say her narrowly written opinions resemble those of the justice she would replace, David Souter.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,Tribune Newspapers | August 7, 2009
WASHINGTON - - Sonia Sotomayor completed an unlikely and historic journey Thursday, one that began with her birth in a Bronx, N.Y., housing project 55 years ago and culminated in her confirmation as the Supreme Court's 111th justice. When she is sworn into office Saturday, Sotomayor will take her place as the high court's first Latino and just its third woman. She was approved by a 68-31 Senate vote after three days of debate. Nine Republicans crossed party lines to support her. But what she brings to the high court goes far beyond her ethnicity or gender.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and James Oliphant and David G. Savage and James Oliphant,Tribune Newspapers | July 13, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Sonia Sotomayor will go before a Senate committee starting today and will be pressed to answer a question that has lingered since President Barack Obama made her his first choice for the Supreme Court. Given a lifetime appointment, will she be a justice who views the law through a liberal lens because of her Latina heritage? In speeches, she said "gender and national origins ... will make a difference in our judging" and added that a "wise Latina" will "more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | April 3, 1995
Donald Fehr -- Embattled union director lands on his feet and bolsters credibility with his membership. No salary cap. No tax plan (yet!). No significant players crossed the picket lines. Under the circumstances, it doesn't get any better than this.Peter Angelos -- Renegade Orioles owner became a baseball cult hero by refusing to use replacement players and calling every wrong-headed move by the owners in advance. Called ownership's hard-line bargaining approach "mass economic suicide." Nearly $900 million in revenue losses later, he turned out to be right.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | March 31, 1995
This weekend. Immediately if not sooner. Now or never.That's the deadline, not simply to end this ridiculous strike, but to forge a new collective bargaining agreement.Let's not hear any talk about playing the 1995 season under the old economic rules and continuing negotiations toward a settlement.That is the worst possible solution.Think about it: A season that starts a month late, topped off by the threat of another strike.The lawyers would rejoice.And the game would be in ruins.How do you sell tickets for a season that is compromised to begin with, and might be aborted in August?
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