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Song And Dance

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NEWS
August 19, 2014
If Baltimore County residents had any doubts about the wisdom of moving toward a hybrid appointed/elected school board rather than the all-appointed version we have now, they were likely erased last week when the board voted to hand Superintendent Dallas Dance what amounts to a $27,000 raise. Not only did the board employ what is at best linguistic sleight of hand to provide Mr. Dance a bigger raise than his contract would allow, but it also shut down any public discussion of whether the raise was warranted.
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NEWS
August 25, 2014
I've been an avid reader of The Sun, but if the paper wants to be a credible publication it has to be fair in its criticism of Baltimore County School Supt. Dallas Dance ( "Balto. Co. schools' song and dance," Aug. 19). I have two grandkids in the county schools, and they are excited to be there because of Mr. Dance, whom they know by name. Yet every time I pick up the paper, The Sun says he has critics, and they're always the same people: Jim Brochin, Mike Collins and Pat McDonough.
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NEWS
By Patti Restivo | May 5, 2014
When community theater vaudeville landed on Main Street in the Laurel Mill Playhouse's spring production of Andrew Lippa's "The Wild Party" weekend before last, it roared. Based on Joseph Moncure March's 1928 narrative poem of the same name - banned in Boston due to risqué content - "The Wild Party" debuted off-Broadway at the Manhattan Theatre Club in 2000, earning the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Music and the 1999-2000 Obie Award for Best Choreography. Produced as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2004, the operetta resurfaced to rave reviews at the Houston's Bayou City Theatrics just last year.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
If Baltimore County residents had any doubts about the wisdom of moving toward a hybrid appointed/elected school board rather than the all-appointed version we have now, they were likely erased last week when the board voted to hand Superintendent Dallas Dance what amounts to a $27,000 raise. Not only did the board employ what is at best linguistic sleight of hand to provide Mr. Dance a bigger raise than his contract would allow, but it also shut down any public discussion of whether the raise was warranted.
FEATURES
By Karen Ackerman | November 25, 1998
Editor's note: When Grandpa opens an old trunk, and pulls out his bowler and gold-tipped cane, a vaudeville man suddenly comes to life, doing the old soft shoe for his favorite audience - his grandchildren.Grandpa was a song and dance man who once danced on the vaudeville stage.When we visit, he tells us about a time before people watched TV, back in the good old days, the song and dance days."Supper in an hour!" Grandma calls from the kitchen."I wonder if my tap shoes still fit?" Grandpa says with a smile.
FEATURES
By AMY BIANCOLLI and AMY BIANCOLLI,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | December 26, 2005
Suggest to Matthew Broderick that he can sing and dance. Imply that he might be good at it. Then ask why, after two Broadway musicals, one made-for-TV Music Man and now a crooning, tapping turn in The Producers, he still won't call himself a song-and-dance man. "I don't resist it. I mean, nothing would make me happier," says Broderick, 43, as unpretentious and polite in life as he comes across on screen. "It's just that there are song-and-dance men who have been dancing their whole lives, who have actual taps on their shoes and things like that.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 25, 1999
"Footloose," a 1984 movie about the irrepressible urge to dance, would seem a natural for the stage. Throw in a handful of teen-pleasing hit songs that topped the pop charts, and "Footloose," the musical, appears to be home free.But for a show that pits youthful exuberance against fundamentalist zeal, the touring production at the Mechanic Theatre is surprisingly tame.The plot is simple. A Chicago teen-ager named Ren and his mom are forced to move in with relatives in a small town after Ren's dad walks out on them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
This is your lucky Wednesday -- a Midweek Madness double feature. Now that you have stopped chuckling at the 'Conduct Us' orchestra, how about a preview of "Homeland" the Musical? Hey, maybe it's not as far-fetched as it might appear, given that one of the hit TV show's stars is Broadway veteran Mandy Patinkin. And you just know it would be fun seeing all those colorful "Homeland" characters break into song and dance, in between dodging "Manchurian Candidate"-style assassins and inappropriate trysts.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2003
The British musical Me and My Girl means another hit this month for the folks at 2nd Star Productions at Bowie Playhouse. Rarely done in Anne Arundel County, this old-fashioned musical comedy seems both fresh and familiar. Its humor springs largely from 1930s-era British Hampshire class distinctions, and its songs reflect the period's faith in enduring love and the dictum of staying in one's proper social niche. The musical, which opened in 1937 in London and was rewritten and revived in 1984, became a huge hit in 1986 on Broadway, where it ran for more than three years and captured a number of Tonys, including Best Musical.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | December 24, 1991
"Crazy For You," at Washington's National Theater, is a little shaky at start, but by the time the Broadway showgirls arrive the show finds its rhythm. From there on, it is consistently amusing.The score is one of its greatest assets. The costumes, dance and scenery are others."Crazy For You" was intended to be a revival of the 1930 "Girl Crazy," in which Ethel Merman starred on Broadway.You may have seen the 1943 movie version starring Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland. Rooney played a New Yorker who journeyed to Arizona where he turned a dude ranch into a major attraction.
NEWS
By Patti Restivo | May 5, 2014
When community theater vaudeville landed on Main Street in the Laurel Mill Playhouse's spring production of Andrew Lippa's "The Wild Party" weekend before last, it roared. Based on Joseph Moncure March's 1928 narrative poem of the same name - banned in Boston due to risqué content - "The Wild Party" debuted off-Broadway at the Manhattan Theatre Club in 2000, earning the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Music and the 1999-2000 Obie Award for Best Choreography. Produced as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2004, the operetta resurfaced to rave reviews at the Houston's Bayou City Theatrics just last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
This is your lucky Wednesday -- a Midweek Madness double feature. Now that you have stopped chuckling at the 'Conduct Us' orchestra, how about a preview of "Homeland" the Musical? Hey, maybe it's not as far-fetched as it might appear, given that one of the hit TV show's stars is Broadway veteran Mandy Patinkin. And you just know it would be fun seeing all those colorful "Homeland" characters break into song and dance, in between dodging "Manchurian Candidate"-style assassins and inappropriate trysts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
They were sprawled on their backs all over the floor, holding their stomachs and emitting a chorus of deep wails and moans. It could have been mistaken for a mass outbreak of food poisoning, but these kids were merely going through vocal exercises, learning the mechanics of proper breath intake and exhalation - part of the daily routine at Camp Hippodrome , held each summer at the historic Hippodrome Theatre. The camp, now in its sixth year, is one of several educational projects sponsored by the Hippodrome Foundation Inc. The foundation makes use of the Hippodrome during the offseason months with one-day programs for special-needs students, a half-day session for seniors and various other activities.
NEWS
March 20, 2012
If Republicans are getting ready to turn an election-year corner, settle on a presidential nominee and begin broadening their political message beyond the reality-challenged segments of the GOP base, Rep. Paul Ryan clearly didn't get the message. The $3.5 trillion spending plan the House budget chairman released Tuesday morning is a great deal like what Mr. Ryan and his tea-party-endorsed colleagues in the House offered last year - with a bit less detail in areas that got him and his party in so much trouble last year, like cuts in Medicare benefits for senior citizens.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Decked out in her most patriotic costume, Flo Keeny arrived ready to wow the audience at an Annapolis retirement home with her part in the South County Showstoppers revue. With less than 30 minutes until curtain time, a change in the lineup had this 77-year-old hoofer dashing for home to retrieve another costume. Her act suddenly shifted from Broadway's "Yankee Doodle Dandy" to a graceful hula and sweet song reflecting on a little grass shack in Hawaii. Instead of tapping across the stage in red, white and blue, she swiveled smoothly in traditional island garb.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
One thing I can guarantee anyone who watches the new Fox musical comedy, Glee, Tuesday night: For the next 48 hours after the show ends, you will not be able to get Journey's song "Don't Stop Believin' " out of your head. For the first 24 hours, that's not such a bad thing - kind of uplifting, in fact. After that, it will start to drive you mad. But the staging of that song by a group of misfit high school students in glee club near the end of the heavily promoted pilot is so elevating and inspirational that it almost redeems all the stereotypes and lame humor that come before.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
I've been an avid reader of The Sun, but if the paper wants to be a credible publication it has to be fair in its criticism of Baltimore County School Supt. Dallas Dance ( "Balto. Co. schools' song and dance," Aug. 19). I have two grandkids in the county schools, and they are excited to be there because of Mr. Dance, whom they know by name. Yet every time I pick up the paper, The Sun says he has critics, and they're always the same people: Jim Brochin, Mike Collins and Pat McDonough.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 29, 1991
''Hudson Hawk,'' the newest Bruce Willis film, began as a song Willis used to sing. He's responsible for the story. The script came about when he became a big enough star to have scripts written for him.It's a very expensive movie. You can see that. Most of the money, however, must have gone into location filming. Apparently, not too much went into the script. Maybe the producers should have paid the writers a little more. ''Hudson Hawk'' is a very funny film, but plot, it hasn't got.If you saw the very recent ''If Looks Could Kill,'' you've already seen what little plot there is in ''Hudson Hawk.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | January 4, 2007
Hellooo, suckers. The makers of the hit musical, Chicago, have gotten rich on a dirty little secret: In our heart of hearts, we all love to be conned. Chicago Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St., at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday; 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $30-$65. Information: 443-703-2406, 410-547-7328 or france-merrickpac.com.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 25, 2006
All sorts of musical and moviemaking tricks are thrown into the blender for Idlewild, and the result is a passionate, enthralling film that isn't afraid to take chances - even if it sometimes should be. Andre Benjamin and Antwan A. Patton, better known as Andre 3000 and Big Boi of the hip-hop duo OutKast, star respectively as Percival and Rooster, boyhood friends whose musical dreams play out in a Prohibition-era Georgia speakeasy known as Church....
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