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By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
A 74-year-old Somerset County man who evacuated his wife from their burning home early Saturday and then re-entered the building was later found dead upstairs, fire officials said. Paul Tyler's body was discovered by firefighters at the top of the second-floor stairwell during a search of the house on Johnson Creek Road in Crisfield. Investigators determined that after discovering the blaze about 1 a.m., Tyler helped his wife outside and then went back in to retrieve some belongings before firefighters arrived.
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NEWS
May 3, 2014
As the developers of the proposed Somerset County wind farm, we feel compelled to respond to the blatant - and seemingly intentional - factual misstatements put forth in recent letters to the editor by opponents of our investment. We acknowledge that rotating wind turbines have the potential to create interference with the radar testing systems at the Patuxent Naval Air Station. But the extensive study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratories funded by Pax River concluded that's there's a simple solution to the potential interference: Don't allow the turbines to operate when the Navy wants to do its radar testing.
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NEWS
July 12, 2013
Some residents of Somerset County - the part of Maryland that sustained the worst damage from last fall's Superstorm Sandy - are upset that the state's application for federal disaster aid would exclude from eligibility those with an income of greater than $48,000 a year for a household of two. That would leave out almost half of the county's homeowners, including teachers, firefighters and other working families, critics say. The cutoff for eligibility is...
NEWS
May 2, 2014
The Great Bay Wind Energy installation in Somerset County on the Lower Eastern Shore is a major construction project requiring additions to existing high voltage lines, the construction of access roads, and other support structures. It also presents an opportunity to develop industries ancillary to the direct operation of wind energy projects within and far beyond Maryland. The economic impact of the Great Bay project occurs in both the initial construction phase and the subsequent operation and maintenance phase.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
Somerset County officials are calling on Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration to revise an application for $8.6 million in federal aid, saying it will render many families hurt by the remnants of Hurricane Sandy ineligible for money to rebuild. The county, hit hard by flooding from the superstorm in October, would be forced to spend the federal disaster relief only on lower-income families — defined at less than $48,000 for a household of two. That would exclude nearly half the county's homeowners, local officials said.
NEWS
March 22, 2003
Ethel Stewart Cottman, a retired Somerset County educator, died Sunday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Atria Assisted-Living Center in Salisbury. She was 89. Born Bertha Mae Ethel Stewart in Concord, Del., she earned degrees in French and English from what is now Delaware State University in Dover. She also studied at Temple University, then-Salisbury State University and the University of Rhode Island. She was a founding member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority's Eastern Shore chapter.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
Robert D. Horsey, a retired Somerset County District Court judge and sailor, died at his Marion Station home Sunday of Lewy Body dementia, a progressive brain disease. He was 72. Judge Horsey was born at his family's Coulbourne Creek home in the lower Eastern Shore county and raised at a nearby farm. After graduating from Crisfield High School in 1951, he worked for two years for the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, surveying the Eastern Seaboard from New England to Key West, Fla. He enlisted in the Army and served as a paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne Division from 1954 to 1956.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 18, 1991
ORIOLE -- Years after Ida B. Harper's family left the land of Somerset County for the factories of Baltimore and Philadelphia, a little church at a country crossroads kept calling them home.Built in 1885, St. James Methodist Episcopal Church was the center of a community of black farmers and watermen here until the economysoured. The church was finally closed in 1965.Now, descendants of the builders of St. James, largely city dwellers with a rediscovered interest in their rural past, want to restore the dilapidated, cedar-sided church with its three-story bell tower.
NEWS
May 21, 2009
Anyone who believes the U.S. has entered a post-Barack Obama age of enlightened race relations ought to spend some time in Somerset County. According to a report released Tuesday by the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, the lower Eastern Shore county shows little to no interest in correcting long-standing racial disparities in hiring, appointments and elected office. Maybe this will shame the powers that be in Maryland's poorest county to make some changes, but given their track record, it probably won't.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | April 21, 1993
Yielding to pressure from the ACLU of Maryland, Princess Anne has agreed to repeal a law that allowed nonresident property owners to vote in municipal elections.The Somerset County town reached an out-of-court settlement with the state's American Civil Liberties Union, which filed a federal lawsuit Feb. 16 challenging the voting law."We're really pleased it was resolved this quickly," said Elliott D. Andalman, a lawyer for the ACLU.The consent decree, filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, was signed yesterday by Senior Judge Joseph H. Young.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
I'd like to respond to the several articles, opinion pieces and letters addressing the topic of wind turbines in Somerset County ( "Gone with the wind farm?" April 20). Do the math. Reporters, editors and readers should question the claims of Pioneer Green. First, take a look at any U.S. wind energy map. There is hardly any wind in Maryland, especially compared to states where wind energy has a solid foothold. That is why Pioneer Green seeks to install turbines 100 feet higher than any other turbines approved by the Federal Aviation Administration.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
Regarding The Sun's editorial asking Gov. Martin O'Malley to veto a bill that would delay approval of a wind farm in Somerset County ( "Gone with the wind farm?" April 20), I take offense at you describing industrial turbines as "windmills. " That's like calling a mountain lion a house cat. Next, when there were 60 turbines in the project a year ago, there were 500 construction jobs and 14.6 permanent jobs. Now that it has been changed to 29 turbines (or 25 depending on who is giving you the numbers)
NEWS
April 23, 2014
In response to the April 21 commentary regarding the proposed wind farm in Somerset County ( "A wind-win situation" , Pioneer Green (aka Great Bay Wind) claims that they have conducted studies showing that the proposed 600-foot-tall industrial wind turbines proposed for the county will not negatively impact Patuxent River naval station radar operations. During the state Senate hearing on April 1, it was clear after much testimony that included input from representatives of Pioneer Green that members of the delegation did not agree with their claim of due diligence.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Legislation that could kill a $200 million wind energy project on the Eastern Shore is moving through the General Assembly, pushed by Southern Maryland lawmakers who contend the 600-foot tall turbines threaten their region's most important job generator, Naval Air Station Patuxent River. But renewable-energy advocates are crying foul. They point out that the project's developer already has reached a deal with the Navy to curtail the turbines' operations so they wouldn't affect the air base.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Some residents of Somerset County - the part of Maryland that sustained the worst damage from last fall's Superstorm Sandy - are upset that the state's application for federal disaster aid would exclude from eligibility those with an income of greater than $48,000 a year for a household of two. That would leave out almost half of the county's homeowners, including teachers, firefighters and other working families, critics say. The cutoff for eligibility is...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
Somerset County officials are calling on Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration to revise an application for $8.6 million in federal aid, saying it will render many families hurt by the remnants of Hurricane Sandy ineligible for money to rebuild. The county, hit hard by flooding from the superstorm in October, would be forced to spend the federal disaster relief only on lower-income families — defined at less than $48,000 for a household of two. That would exclude nearly half the county's homeowners, local officials said.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
Rescuers found the body yesterday of one of three duck hunters who have been missing since Friday, said a spokeswoman for the state Department of Natural Resources said. Adam M. Miller, 25, of Elizabethtown, Pa., was found near Janes Island State Park in Somerset County yesterday about noon, said Heather Lynch, a DNR spokeswoman. Michael A. Jones, 27, of Marietta, Pa., and William E. Nurmi of Ocean City were still missing yesterday evening and authorities had little hope of finding the men. Temperatures stayed below freezing all day yesterday, and rescuers shifted their efforts toward "recovery rather than rescue" after sunset last night, Lynch said.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
Even the most jaded observer must acknowledge there's something admirable about the desire of so many living on Smith Island to see their community survive and prosper. Residents of this marshy (and shrinking in both population and real estate) archipelago on the lower Eastern Shore have had to overcome much in recent years, particularly as their chief means of livelihood, harvesting the seafood bounty of the Chesapeake Bay, has declined. But it's one thing to admire the hard work, independence and faith of Smith Island's residents - who number a mere 276, according to the 2010 Census - and it's another to deny the reality of their circumstances.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
WatermanJohnny Parks was 9 years old when Hurricane Hazel slammed Maryland's Eastern Shore in October 1954. Until this week, he thought he might never see a storm like that again. On Wednesday, he surveyed what Sandy had wrought at the shack where he sorts and packages the crabs he catches on the Chesapeake Bay: a mess of soggy paperwork, an overturned freezer and three antique cars soaked to the floorboards. "I'm 68 years old, and I've never seen water that high," said Parks, of Rumbley, who was among more than 550 people rescued from rising floodwaters in this southwestern corner of the Eastern Shore where residents' livelihood is won and lost on the bay. During the storm, Parks was worried that Ellen, his wife of 44 years who has heart problems, wouldn't survive the terror.
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