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NEWS
April 3, 2007
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Fighting between Ethiopian-backed government forces and Islamic insurgents in Somalia's capital has killed nearly 400 people, mostly civilians, in the past four days, a Somali human rights group said yesterday. The fighting abated long enough yesterday to allow thousands of people to flee the ruined coastal city on foot and in donkey carts, cars and trucks. About 47,000 people -- mainly women and children -- have abandoned their homes in the past 10 days, according to the U.N. refugee agency.
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NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2007
NAIROBI, Kenya -- In some of the bloodiest fighting in months, at least 20 people were killed yesterday in Somalia's capital. The dead included seven government soldiers, some of whose bodies were dragged through the streets and set on fire, witnesses said. The gruesome scene was reminiscent of the 1993 crash of a U.S. Black Hawk helicopter in Mogadishu during an ill-fated mission that killed 18 American servicemen. The latest clashes began after government soldiers, aided by Ethiopian troops, launched an early morning raid on the outskirts of town.
NEWS
By Josh Ruxin | March 5, 2007
KIGALI, Rwanda -- American jets and Ethiopian forces recently conducted strikes in Somalia in support of that nation's fledgling democratic government. The event received passing notice in the United States, but to those of us working in East Africa, and specifically in Rwanda, it was cause for optimism. It demonstrated the willingness of Ethiopia and Somalia to put aside past differences and unite against radical Islamists who threaten both. It suggested that an era of thinking and acting regionally may have arrived in East Africa.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 2007
NAIROBI, Kenya -- A fugitive Islamist leader praised recently by the U.S. government as a moderate who could bring much-needed public support to Somalia's transitional government has turned himself over to Kenyan authorities, U.S. officials said yesterday. Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed, a former teacher who rose to become chairman of the executive council of Somalia's Islamic Courts Union, is being held for questioning at a posh Nairobi hotel, the officials said. Ahmed, who functioned as de facto president of the courts, surrendered to Kenyan police Sunday at the border city of Liboi, where thousands of Somalis have been waiting to enter refugee camps.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2007
MOGADISHU, Somalia --Somali officials said yesterday that dozens of people were killed in a U.S. airstrike on Sunday, most of them Islamist fighters fleeing in armed pickup trucks across a remote, muddy stretch of the Kenya-Somalia border. U.S. officials said al-Qaida terrorists had been the target of the strike, which they said had killed about a dozen people. But the officials acknowledged that the identities of the victims were still unknown. Several residents of the area, in the southern part of the country, said dozens of civilians had been killed, and news of the attack immediately set off new waves of anti-American anger in Mogadishu, Somalia's battle-scarred capital, where the United States has a complicated legacy.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Under cover of the Ethiopian move into Somalia, U.S. officials launched an intensive effort to capture or kill three key suspects in the bombings of U.S. embassies in Africa more than eight years ago that killed 224 people, including 12 American diplomats. An Air Force Special Operations gunship struck a place in southern Somalia where the suspects were believed to be hiding, a senior Pentagon official said yesterday. U.S. military and counterterrorism officials said they did not know whether any of the men had been killed.
NEWS
By Matthew Mainen | January 8, 2007
As Ethiopian troops made haste toward Mogadishu at the request of Somalia's legitimate government, the 22-member Arab League demanded that Ethiopia withdraw its troops "immediately." In other words, the idea of national sovereignty, the hallmark of international law, means little to the Arab League. Countries such as Saudi Arabia and Sudan claim not only to understand international law but also to follow it. Of course, such countries have broken nearly every international convention on human rights, but for these countries to demonstrate outright disdain for the very foundation of international law is reprehensible.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 2007
. BAIDOA, Somalia --Kenyan officials announced yesterday that they were closing their northern border because of the conflict in Somalia, but denied that they had turned back hundreds of refugees. For the past few days, Ethiopian-led forces have been hunting down the remnants of Somalia's once-powerful Islamic movement, pushing fighters steadily south toward the Kenyan border. Ethiopian officials have said that the Islamist fighters are headed to a remote jungle outpost called Ras Kamboni, which suspected terrorists have used before as a hide-out.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 2007
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Their leaders slipped out of this capital under the cover of darkness. The plum jobs are gone. Their former offices were the first to be looted in a spasm of vandalism last week by angry young men. Yesterday, Somali Prime Minister Ali Mohammed Gedi renewed his offer of amnesty to midlevel officials and fighters of Somalia's now-defunct Islamic Courts Union who lay down their weapons. He also issued a three-day deadline for everyone in Mogadishu to turn in their guns.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 31, 2006
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Leaders from Somalia's capital gathered yesterday where matters of importance are often debated and settled here: under the shade of a thorny aqab tree. This one was at a bombed-out military barracks on the edge of Mogadishu, because the guest of honor, Somalian President Abdullahi Yusuf, refuses to enter a notoriously dangerous city that until two weeks ago had been under the control of an Islamic alliance. "I will come to Mogadishu once everything is in place," he said.
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