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NEWS
September 22, 1991
Alexander Solzhenitsyn lived the nightmare, not the illusion, of Soviet history and has refused to keep silent. Born the year after the Communist revolution, he served in World War II and was decorated for heroism. His life since then has been a series of reversals. He was condemned to the "Gulag Archipelago" for anti-Soviet activity, exonerated of all charges and permitted to expose prison conditions when it suited Nikita Khrushchev to tarnish Josef Stalin. He was awarded the Nobel Prize -- and formally accused of treason and forcibly expelled from his homeland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
When Ignat Solzhenitsyn's career began a couple decades ago, the piano was his primary focus. In short order, the podium attracted his attention, and he has enjoyed significant success as a conductor. Over the weekend, this son of the Nobel Prize-winning Russian writer and dissident Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn led the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in stirring performances of Mozart's Requiem and Arvo Part's "Tabula Rasa. " The Estonian-born Part is perhaps best described as a musical mystic.
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NEWS
May 29, 1994
In his 18 years as a reclusive writer in Cavendish, Vt., Alexander Solzhenitsyn created an ideal Russia. It existed in his mind, within the walls of his household and in the forests of birch trees, which had the same sun and blue sky that on good days can be seen in Russia.He saw few visitors besides his family, had virtually no contact with the outside world. Instead, he applied the grueling self-discipline he adopted during his years in Stalin's gulags.He got up at 6 every morning and spent the rest of the day writing, completing "The Red Wheel," his four-volume history of events leading to the 1917 Russian Revolution.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | August 9, 2008
For reasons I can't precisely remember, I began reading Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn's monumentalaccount of the Soviet penal labor camps, The Gulag Archipelago, in the late 1980s. I was working for a company that published long histories of wars and other pivotal events; my job was to churn out, in a breezy but authoritative style, captions for the book's photographs. Perhaps I thought that reading Mr. Solzhenitsyn, whose novels mingled lyrical descriptions of the suffering human soul with a profound sense of moral outrage, would help me find my own voice as a writer.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 27, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russians have been speaking of it this week simply as "The Return."Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, the stern and exacting protagonist in Russia's struggle for historical truth, arrived in his native country today after 20 years in exile.Upon the 75-year-old author's arrival at the Siberian city of Magadan, the Associated Press reported, he stooped and touched the ground with both hands after emerging from a flight from Alaska. "I am so overwhelmed with so many different kinds of emotions," he said.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 19, 1990
MOSCOW -- A unique Russian voice, its uncompromising tone familiar from long ago, yesterday joined the tumultuous debate going on here about the economic and political future of the Soviet Union.And though dispatched from the exiled writer's Vermont hideaway, the arguments of Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn fit surprisingly smoothly into the Moscow discussion.For the first time in nearly three decades, Mr. Solzhenitsyn, 72, a towering figure in 20th-century Russia, directly addressed the Soviet public on a current political topic through an official publication.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 29, 1994
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- Showing that 20 years of exile had only deepened his thunder, Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn used his first news conference back on Russian soil yesterday to fire bolts former Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Westernizing reformers, Russian right-wing leader Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky and, above all, unrepentant Communist "oppressors and executioners."Like a prophet of old emerging from long seclusion to castigate a fallen world, the 75-year-old writer held forth with passion and eloquence for almost two hours on Russia's need for repentance and reconciliation, on the errors of its post-Communist course, on the sufferings of the Russian nation.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 2008
MOSCOW - Nobel laureate Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, the reclusive icon of the Russian intelligentsia and chronicler of communist repression, has died of heart failure, Russian news agencies reported. He was 89. Stephan Solzhenitsyn told the Associated Press his father died late yesterday, but he declined to comment further. The soulful writer and spiritual father of Russia's nationalist patriotic movement lived to be reunited with his beloved homeland after two decades of exile - only to be as distressed by communism's damage to the Russian character as he was by his earlier forced estrangement from the land and people he loved.
NEWS
By Dimitri K. Simes and Dimitri K. Simes,Special to the sun | February 8, 1998
The dramatic and sad story of Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn described in D. M. Thomas' new book "Alexander Solzhenitsyn: "A Century in His Life" (St. Martin's Press, 583 pages, 1998) is more than the tale of the Russian writer's evolution from a heroic Nobel Prize winner to an irrelevant polemicist. More broadly, Solzhenitsyn's life tells us a lot about Russia's great transition from communist totalitarianism to oligarchic capitalism - the complexity of which confused many Western politicians and commentators eager for simple answers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | January 10, 1999
In 1974, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn startled the world with the publication of "The Gulag Archipelago." This huge work, based on interviews and reminiscences, documented the Soviet slave labor system from 1918 to 1956. No other statement, with the possible exception of Nikita Khrushchev's 1956 20th Communist Party Congress report, "The Personality Cult and Its Consequences," had its impact. In effect, it destroyed forever any illusion that Soviet communism was anything less than the most vicious form of totalitarianism.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 6, 2008
Alexander Solzhenitsyn is dead. Peter Rodman is dead. And memory is dying with them. Over the weekend, Mr. Solzhenitsyn, the 89-year-old literary titan, and Mr. Rodman, the American foreign policy intellectual, passed away. I knew Mr. Rodman and liked him very much. We were partners in a debate at Oxford University last year. He provided the gravitas. A former protege of Henry Kissinger and high-ranking official in two Republican administrations, Mr. Rodman was one of the wisest of the wise men of the conservative foreign policy establishment.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 2008
MOSCOW - Nobel laureate Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, the reclusive icon of the Russian intelligentsia and chronicler of communist repression, has died of heart failure, Russian news agencies reported. He was 89. Stephan Solzhenitsyn told the Associated Press his father died late yesterday, but he declined to comment further. The soulful writer and spiritual father of Russia's nationalist patriotic movement lived to be reunited with his beloved homeland after two decades of exile - only to be as distressed by communism's damage to the Russian character as he was by his earlier forced estrangement from the land and people he loved.
NEWS
September 4, 2006
There is a small but memorable scene in Russian novelist and dissident Alexander Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago in which he sits upon the banks of the Belomor Canal, observing two nearly identical barges equally loaded with pine logs moving past each other in opposite directions. "And canceling the one load against the other," the author wrote, "we get zero." In seemingly endless lines moving in opposite directions, Maryland drivers spend more time behind the wheel going to and from work and school than ever.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2006
CASTLETON, Va.-- --I was looking for a retreat," Lorin Maazel says, by way of explaining how he came to be a Virginia farm owner 18 years ago. "I saw myself as the Solzhenitsyn of conductors," he says. "I would build a wall. No one would see me." A thin smile comes across Maazel's face. "But I'm really not the hermit type." The Turn of the Screw conducted by Lorin Maazel, 7:30 tonight at the Kennedy Center Terrace Theater, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, N.W. Tickets are $35 to $50. Call 800-444-1324 or 202-467-4600.
FEATURES
October 8, 2001
Today in history: Oct. 8 In 1869, the 14th president of the United States, Franklin Pierce, died in Concord, N.H. In 1871, the Great Chicago Fire erupted while another deadly blaze broke out in Peshtigo, Wis. In 1892, Sergei Rachmaninoff publicly performed his piano Prelude in C-sharp minor in Moscow. In 1956, Don Larsen pitched the only perfect game in a World Series to date as the New York Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers, 2-0. In 1970, Soviet author Alexander Solzhenitsyn won the Nobel Prize for literature.
TOPIC
By Stephen Vicchio | June 17, 2001
"Gentle vengeance may be easier for the exactor, but is it justice?" -- Aeschylus "Seven Against Thebes" TIMOTHY McVeigh is dead. Six years ago, on a sunny spring morning in the heartland of America, this son of a General Motors auto plant worker and a stay-at-home mother filled a rented truck with ammonium nitrate and racing fuel and walked to safety a few blocks away as the explosion he intended destroyed a federal office building and the lives of...
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 19, 1994
IRKUTSK, Russia -- Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn stared steadily down from the heights of an auditorium stage, looking at the expectant crowd before him like a stern father not entirely happy with his children.The great Russian writer, stopping here on his inspection tour of eternal Russia, put on his glasses, opened his notebook, picked up his pen and told the people of Irkutsk to step forward and tell him their side of the story."I will be an accurate secretary," he informed them in a voice that tends to thunder rather than speak.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | February 4, 2001
"Solzhenitsyn: A Soul in Exile," by Joseph Pearce. Baker Books. 334 pages. $17.99. One day last September, the president of Russia stopped by the suburban Moscow home of Alexander Solzhenitsyn, presented the writer with a large bouquet and spent two hours discussing with him the fate of their long-suffering land. The next day Solzhenitsyn, speaking to a television interviewer, withdrew his previous criticism of Putin and instead offered praise for the Russian leader's "fighting spirit," "extraordinary prudence" and "balanced judgment."
NEWS
April 22, 2000
Carmen Dillon, 91, who won an Academy Award in 1948 for her work as art director on Laurence Olivier's "Hamlet," died April 12 in London. Ms. Dillon, who created sets for many memorable British films for more than 40 years, was the first female art director in the British film industry. Dillon joined the art department at Fox Studios north of London in the 1930s after six years of training as an architect. She worked with Paul Sherriff on the Academy Award-nominated design for Olivier's 1944 classic "Henry V," but it was her work on Olivier's "Hamlet" that won her the Oscar -- for set direction on a black-and-white film.
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