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Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The owner of a Laurel dry-cleaning business has pleaded guilty to improperly disposing of cleaning solvents near Millersville, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced Friday. Mehret Sium, owner of Discount Dry Cleaners LLLC, entered guilty pleas Aug. 31 in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to charges of illegal disposal of hazardous wastes and failure to follow hazardous-waste transportation requirements, according to court records. The case stems from a tip received in March, when the Maryland Department of the Environment's hazardous response team found 18 drums of dry cleaning solvent waste on the side of Dicus Mill Road in Anne Arundel County.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
State environmental officials are drilling monitoring wells on the outskirts of Salisbury to get a better handle on ground-water contamination there that has fouled dozens of household wells with a potentially cancer-causing chemical, according to a spokesman. The Maryland Department of the Environment has contracted to install a total of 10 wells in the residential area south of the city to gather more information on the movement and severity of contaminated ground water, said Jay Apperson, the agency's deputy communications director.
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NEWS
February 27, 2000
The manager of McIntyre's Auto Repair in Brooklyn Park has pleaded guilty to illegally dumping solvents on its lot, while charges against the business have been dropped, the Maryland attorney general's office announced. In exchange for the plea in Anne Arundel District Court on Thursday, Gary Lee Brown Sr., 38, was given probation before judgment by Judge Paul A. Hackner, and ordered to perform 100 hours of community service "of an environmental cleanup nature," the attorney general's office said.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The owner of a Laurel dry-cleaning business has pleaded guilty to improperly disposing of cleaning solvents near Millersville, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced Friday. Mehret Sium, owner of Discount Dry Cleaners LLLC, entered guilty pleas Aug. 31 in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to charges of illegal disposal of hazardous wastes and failure to follow hazardous-waste transportation requirements, according to court records. The case stems from a tip received in March, when the Maryland Department of the Environment's hazardous response team found 18 drums of dry cleaning solvent waste on the side of Dicus Mill Road in Anne Arundel County.
BUSINESS
By David Colker and David Colker,Los Angeles Times | May 29, 2007
Talk about money laundering. A check made out to person A is bathed in a chemical available at any hardware store. In just a few minutes it's blank again and made out to person B - who is a thief. This process, which has been around for decades, is known as "check washing" among con men, and in an era of high-tech crimes it seems almost quaint. Except that it's back. Along with other check crimes. "What we are hearing is that it's a backlash after so much effort made by banks to boost security on their Web sites," said Will Wade, technology editor for trade journal American Banker.
NEWS
By GREG BARRETT and GREG BARRETT,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
The plot thickened yesterday about the origin of the mystery contaminant that damaged the plane of Maryland aviator Gus McLeod and caused him to indefinitely postpone his plans to circumnavigate the globe. Chemical analysis of a pollutant in the gas of McLeod's single-engine aircraft found a "concoction of caustic solvents" consistent with a lacquer thinner, said McLeod, a former CIA chemist who had the substance tested at a local lab. He believes solvents were poured deliberately into his tank in an effort to sabotage his record-setting attempt to travel solo and pole-to-pole around the world.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
Children of women exposed to common organic solvents during pregnancy have significantly lower scores on a wide range of cognitive, motor and behavioral tests, according to a new study. The average IQ of the exposed group was eight points lower than a group of comparable unexposed children - a gap one expert described as "huge." The study, which appeared in this month's issue of The Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, focused solely on solvent exposure at work. "This has tremendous implications for the female work force," said University of Toronto psychologist Maru Barrera, one of the authors.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 26, 1991
So your shelves are lined with products that say DANGER! CAUTION! WARNING! and other little hints like that, but you paid for them, by gum, and you are going to use them.Or maybe you bought that one can of incredibly toxic paint stripper because you can't find anything else to do the job. Or you have to have this tube of killer glue because it's just too embarrassing to go around with bent paper clips in your eyeglasses.Fine. For you Must Haves, here are some tips about how to use toxic household products with minimum impact on your health and on the health of those around you.* Buy the smallest amount needed for the job. You don't want any extra lying around the house, and you may be legally required to dispose of leftovers as household hazardous waste.
NEWS
October 10, 1996
Central Special School is expected to reopen today, with a water tank pumping fresh water into the Edgewater school for NTC severely disabled children.Contractors and school employees were to work through the night to set up the temporary water line with a tanker and pump, said spokeswoman Jane Doyle.The school has been closed for three days because the water supply for the five-school South River complex was found to be contaminated with solvents Oct. 3. Since Friday, bottled water has been in use at the other four schools while water lines were being flushed and water samples tested.
NEWS
September 12, 2002
Woodrow Harry Kratz, who devised a system for the automatic delivery of fuel oil and later operated an air-conditioning and cleaning-solvents business, died of respiratory failure Sept. 5 at Bonnie Blink Masonic Home in Cockeysville. He was 89, and a former Sparks resident. Mr. Kratz was born and raised in West Baltimore and graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1929. While working as a route dispatcher for Standard Oil Co. in Baltimore in the early 1930s, Mr. Kratz came up with the idea of automatic fuel delivery.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | April 10, 2012
State legislators often prioritize important legislation the way kindergartners rank vegetables among the food groups. They focus on media-friendly social legislation instead of structural reform requiring time and effort to understand and craft. Why, for example, did they pass gay marriage and a law regulating how long a child must face rearward in a car seat but not figure out the budget until the absolute last minute? And why didn't they spend time this year on how to pay the pensions of the 373,000 people in the state retirement system?
NEWS
October 4, 2011
Jay Hancock 's article about shared sacrifices was well written and I couldn't agree more with his main thrust of putting everything on the table for all to sacrifice, from entitlements to cuts in spending to raising revenue ("Fixing America needs contributions from everybody," Oct. 2). I will point to one piece and take another point of view. That is Medicare. I believe there is a way to reform Medicare making it more solvent without sacrifice. I suggest lowering the age of eligibility for Medicare to 55. This would add about 20 million new younger premium paying subscribers to Medicare.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | July 30, 2009
Ventilation systems are being installed by the state in three homes in Baltimore's Westport neighborhood, according to state officials, after tests found toxic vapors seeping into the dwellings from long-abandoned industrial sites nearby that had been the focus of an emergency hazardous-waste cleanup decades ago. In addition, said James Carroll of the Maryland Department of the Environment, efforts are under way to treat potentially cancer-causing solvents...
BUSINESS
By David Colker and David Colker,Los Angeles Times | May 29, 2007
Talk about money laundering. A check made out to person A is bathed in a chemical available at any hardware store. In just a few minutes it's blank again and made out to person B - who is a thief. This process, which has been around for decades, is known as "check washing" among con men, and in an era of high-tech crimes it seems almost quaint. Except that it's back. Along with other check crimes. "What we are hearing is that it's a backlash after so much effort made by banks to boost security on their Web sites," said Will Wade, technology editor for trade journal American Banker.
NEWS
By GREG BARRETT and GREG BARRETT,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
The plot thickened yesterday about the origin of the mystery contaminant that damaged the plane of Maryland aviator Gus McLeod and caused him to indefinitely postpone his plans to circumnavigate the globe. Chemical analysis of a pollutant in the gas of McLeod's single-engine aircraft found a "concoction of caustic solvents" consistent with a lacquer thinner, said McLeod, a former CIA chemist who had the substance tested at a local lab. He believes solvents were poured deliberately into his tank in an effort to sabotage his record-setting attempt to travel solo and pole-to-pole around the world.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
Children of women exposed to common organic solvents during pregnancy have significantly lower scores on a wide range of cognitive, motor and behavioral tests, according to a new study. The average IQ of the exposed group was eight points lower than a group of comparable unexposed children - a gap one expert described as "huge." The study, which appeared in this month's issue of The Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, focused solely on solvent exposure at work. "This has tremendous implications for the female work force," said University of Toronto psychologist Maru Barrera, one of the authors.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | July 30, 2009
Ventilation systems are being installed by the state in three homes in Baltimore's Westport neighborhood, according to state officials, after tests found toxic vapors seeping into the dwellings from long-abandoned industrial sites nearby that had been the focus of an emergency hazardous-waste cleanup decades ago. In addition, said James Carroll of the Maryland Department of the Environment, efforts are under way to treat potentially cancer-causing solvents...
FEATURES
November 6, 1990
If you work regularly with art or craft materials that are toxic, be aware of symptoms that might show your susceptibility to various chemicals. According to "Safe Practices in the Arts and Crafts: A Studio Guide," you should be suspicious if:* you develop asthma as an adult. Asthmas beginning in adults almost invariably come from environmental contaminants.* your symptoms are worse when you work -- especially after long sessions -- and improve when you stay away from your studio.* you have an increase in the frequency or severity of your respiratory infections, especially those in which you are short of breath.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2004
Six months after Taneytown shut down its most productive well, construction has begun on the installation of filters to remove a solvent that tested above the federal standard for drinking water. City officials hope to have Well No. 13 back in service by the end of next month -- although at half its capacity -- as car-washing and lawn-watering season begins to increase demand. The pump house first must almost double in size to accommodate the charcoal filters -- three 3,000-pound cylinders that each measure 6 feet tall by 4 feet in diameter -- said John V. Dillenburg, a retired senior vice president for ESAB who is working on the Taneytown project.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2004
Six months after Taneytown shut down its most productive well, construction has begun on the installation of filters to remove a solvent that tested above the federal standard for drinking water. City officials hope to have Well No. 13 back in service by the end of next month - although at half its capacity - as car-washing and lawn-watering season begins to increase demand. The pump house first must almost double in size to accommodate the charcoal filters - three 3,000-pound cylinders that each measures 6 feet tall by 4 feet in diameter - said John V. Dillenburg, a retired senior vice president for ESAB who is still working on the Taneytown project.
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