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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
Winter officially arrived with the solstice at 6:12 Friday morning, and along with it came a brisk wind in the Baltimore area and snow in Western Maryland. The day's high at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport came at midnight, around 57 degrees, but colder air is blowing into the region. Wind gusts began to top 30 mph after midnight at the airport, and temperatures dropped to 41 degrees by 9 a.m. Snow flurries are possible Friday afternoon across central and southern Maryland, including all of the Baltimore area.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
It has begun to feel like fall, with schools in session and a chill in the air, but the season actually arrives at the moment of autumnal equinox at 10:29 p.m. Monday. At that instant, Earth will be rotating upright on its axis, giving the northern and southern hemispheres equal sunlight and making the length of day and night roughly equal. In Baltimore, the sun will stay up for 12 hours or more until Friday. It's the tilt of the Earth's axis that gives us seasons -- at the winter solstice, the axis is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun, and at the summer solstice, it's tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun. Meteorological fall started Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 27, 1999
Mashed potatoes in a martini glass? "They make me feel so elegant," said attorney Shirley Bigley, as she nibbled the caviar-capped mound.Elegance was in the air at the Maryland Science Center's Solstice '99 celebration. Subtitled the "Lazy, Hazy, Crazy Days of Summer," the fete featured an old-fashioned lawn-party theme, with Astroturfed areas in the Hyatt Regency Hotel offering jim-dandy diversions such as a putting green and a spot of croquet. There also were handouts of hand-cranked ice cream.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Though schools are out and pools are open, summer doesn't officially begin until early Saturday morning. The summer solstice, the point at which the Earth's axis tilts the northern hemisphere its furthest toward the sun, occurs at 6:51 a.m. As the National Climatic Data Center explains , it is when the solar energy reaching Earth is the strongest in the northern hemisphere. At the solstice, the sun takes its most northern path through the sky, which means on this side of the globe, we have our longest days and shortest nights of the year. Friday is the last day of the year in which we can look forward to more sunshine tomorrow.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 4, 1993
Solstice '93 was an all star production that raised $125,000 for educational programs at the Maryland Science Center. Some guests began the cocktail hour with star-studded shows in the Planetarium and IMAX Theater, while others stopped to chat with Paul Blair, former Orioles star center fielder, who was graciously signing autographs at the entrance to the center's fabulous new "All Sorts of Sports" exhibit.On cue, an actor dressed as a film director declared that all celebrity guests were needed at the Hyatt for a final casting call.
NEWS
June 26, 1997
In a photo caption in yesterday's Howard County edition of The Sun, the name of an event in Highland last weekend -- the Woodstack '97 Summer Solstice Celebration -- was misspelled.The Sun regrets the error.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 1, 2001
How do you tie in your annual gala with a new exhibit about the Titanic? You make sure the whole thing is planned as an elegant evening with overtones of the luxury ocean liner. But you make sure the party ends on a buoyant note. It all made for a successful "Solstice 2001" for the Maryland Science Center. Some 600 guests were greeted with champagne and hors d'oeuvres, before getting a chance to peruse the center's new exhibit, "Titanic Science: The Real Artifacts. The True Stories." Then, it was down to dinner -- serenaded by a string trio -- under a tent swathed in sky-blue chiffon.
NEWS
December 25, 1994
It is no accident that Christmas quickly follows the winter solstice. Four days ago, the sun stopped in its southward journey and turned around. However much hardship lies ahead (far less, we trust, than last winter), be assured that Spring, warmth and rebirth are already on the way.The silent night of waiting, then the joyful birth. Wrap it all in faith and you have the Christmas message. In bleak mid-winter, carefully nourished hope yields an epiphany and the world has cause to sing.Christmas, a Christian feast day, has worked its way into the secular culture not just because it provides an irresistible commercial opportunity but also because it wraps grand themes of the human drama in such an appealing story.
NEWS
By Andrew Reiner | December 21, 2000
FAITH HAS ALWAYS been a tricky thing for me this time of year. I lose sight of the messages behind the holidays from beneath the mountain of expensive gifts and mail-order catalogs. Not that I don't try to break consumerism's hold. I always begin the season distended with hope and optimism. But two weeks into December, I become deflated from shopping in crowded malls and watching movies on television that create romantic ideals about the holidays that are as impossible to re-create as a Martha Stewart flan.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | December 8, 1991
The Christmas concert tradition here includes more than just the "Messiah" and "Amahl and the Night Visitors." It also &L embraces the annual Winter Solstice concert by home-based folk instrumentalists Helicon.This year's event, the sixth annual for the trio, will be held Saturday at 8 p.m. in Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium. In addition to Helicon -- which includes Chris Norman on wooden flutes and penny whistle, Ken Kolodner on hammer dulcimer and fiddle and Robin Bullock on guitar, cittern and fiddle -- the concert will feature Eugene Freisen, Paul Halley and Glen Velez of the Paul Winter Consort.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Baltimore's first sunset to take place after 5 p.m. since November occurs Wednesday evening. The last time the sun set after 5 p.m. or later was Nov. 6. Just a few days before that, sunset didn't come until after 6 p.m., but then an end to daylight savings time came. Sunsets are getting about a minute later each day this time of year, and those gains accelerate as we approach spring. Sunset will near 5:30 p.m. by the end of the month. Sunrises are also meanwhile starting to get earlier.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2013
People wore shorts and T-shirts all around Baltimore on Saturday as temperatures hit a record 70 degrees, with slightly higher temperatures expected Sunday. Both the Inner Harbor and BWI Marshall Airport recorded highs of 70 degrees, while Annapolis hit 72 degrees, the National Weather Service reported. The previous record high for the day at BWI was 62 degrees in 2011. A normal high is 44 degrees. The warm weather came during the winter solstice, the "shortest" day of the year.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
The Long Night's Moon will be in the night sky early Tuesday morning, getting its name from its proximity to the winter solstice. But it may be hard to see through growing clouds from another snowy system. The moon reaches its fullest phase at 4:28 a.m. Tuesday, so it will be nearly full Monday night when it rises at 5:22 p.m., about half an hour after sunset. It's also known as the Full Cold Moon.  It will be out all night, not setting until 7:15 a.m., just a few minutes before sunrise.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Good news for those missing the sunshine: We have already reached the earliest sunsets of the year in Baltimore, even though the winter solstice is still almost two weeks away. The sun sets at 4:43 p.m. today, as it has for the past several days and the next few days. But it has started shifting ever so slightly later already, reaching 4:47 p.m. by the solstice Dec. 21. Sunrises meanwhile continue getting later until early January. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
We may be only a few weeks removed from the summer solstice, but Earth reaches the furthest point from the sun in its annual orbit on Friday. The phenomenon is known as aphelion. The opposite, perihelion, when Earth is closest to the sun, occurred Jan 2. Because orbits have an elliptical shape, Earth's distance from the sun varies, just as the moon's distance from the Earth varies (creating last month's "Supermoon"). It may seem strange that Earth is at its furthest from the sun when it is hottest here in the Northern Hemisphere, but the seasons are linked to the planet's tilt on its axis.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
The sun is already out several fewer seconds each day since last week's solstice, but the time of sunset has continued to shift later -- until Friday. Thursday's sunset, at 8:37 p.m., is just about the latest of the year. The sunset hovers around 8:37 p.m. for about a week, shifting by a few seconds each night. We already hit the earliest sunrise, 5:39 a.m. on about June 14. The solstice, on Friday, brought the most sunshine of the year, with 14 hours, 56 minutes and 19 seconds between sunrise and sunset.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | December 5, 1994
The days are getting shorter. The sun rises later and later. My almanac says it will come up at exactly 7:11 this morning. From my bedroom window, I search the horizon, and as soon as I see the bright tip of the sun I glance at my wrist watch.7:10:58It's a digital watch, so it keeps the exact time. I know it's the exact time because I check it every Monday morning by calling the telephone company's toll-free time number.''Good morning. At the tone, the time will be seven-eleven. Exactly.''Bong.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | June 29, 2008
The Maryland Science Center offers a variety of activities to keep children interested and entertained. And, at its annual Solstice gala this year, it did the same for adults. As hundreds of grown-ups entered the center, they were offered the chance to participate in fun science experiments such as exploding hydrogen balloons, putting nitrogen-soaked animal crackers in their mouths and blowing smoke, or holding hands around an electrostatic machine to act as human electrical conduits. "Fabulous party.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
The summer solstice arrives Friday and brings an annual peak of nearly 15 hours of sunshine in Baltimore. The "length" of the day, as measured by hours of daylight, is actually 14 hours, 56 minutes and 19 seconds. Thursday's daylight hours last virtually as long, with the solstice arriving at precisely 1:04 a.m. Friday. Starting Saturday, the time the sun appears in our skies shrinks by a few seconds each day. The difference amounts to about 3 minutes by the end of the month, but accelerates to be an hour less by early August.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
It's expected to be a bit too cold for it to feel like spring Sunday, but one sign that warmer days are ahead is here: For the first time this year, there will be more daylight than darkness. Since Sept. 26, the time between sunrise and sunset has been less than 12 hours , or half the day. The length of daylight continued to shrink until it was about 9 hours, 24 minutes around the winter solstice. But by Sunday, it will have grown again to about 12 hours, 2 minutes between sunrise at about 7:14 a.m. and sunset at about 7:16 p.m. The milestone comes a few days before the vernal equinox on Wednesday because of differences in latitude.
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