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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Seth Adelsberger is a 34-year-old Baltimore painter and printmaker. He does not have a master's degree from an art school, he is not represented by a gallery, and he has not won a prestigious prize. Nonetheless, on Sunday, a solo show that distills Adelsberger's visual experiments over the past five years opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art . The exhibit is an unusual honor for an unproven painter, signaling to the art world nationwide that museum curators think Adelsberger is a talent worth watching.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Seth Adelsberger is a 34-year-old Baltimore painter and printmaker. He does not have a master's degree from an art school, he is not represented by a gallery, and he has not won a prestigious prize. Nonetheless, on Sunday, a solo show that distills Adelsberger's visual experiments over the past five years opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art . The exhibit is an unusual honor for an unproven painter, signaling to the art world nationwide that museum curators think Adelsberger is a talent worth watching.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 22, 1995
Has Eric Bogosian been domesticated? Become kinder and gentler?L The idea seems as incongruous as a sheep in wolf's clothing.Yet that's the claim made by this intense, even abrasive %J performer, who's best known for the take-no-prisoners approach his one-man shows."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
Hope everyone had a peaceful, perhaps hangover-nursing Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We were off, too, so that explains the "Week in Nightlife" post coming today. Anyway, on with the shows: On Tuesday, the Guess Who's lead singer Burton Cummings performs a sold-out solo show at Rams Head on Stage in Annapolis. If you're really in need of live music, head south for Bike Trip at D.C.'s Black Cat . On Wednesday, Southern sludge-metal married couple Jucifer plays Sonar's Talking Head Lounge.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | January 11, 2007
When Josh Lefkowitz talks about Center Stage, he uses terms like "holy moment" and "the birthing of a writer." To be specific, the 25-year-old actor-turned-playwright is referring to something that happened three years ago, when he had a bit part -- basically "pushing scenery" -- in Center Stage's production of Sweeney Todd. Back then, he often visited the dramaturgy office and regaled resident dramaturg Gavin Witt and former literary manager Madeleine Oldham with stories -- tales of odd jobs he'd had while trying to make it as an actor and of his adulation for monologist Spalding Gray.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 1, 2001
Audiences who saw the most recent installment of Queer Cafe at the Theatre Project last June got a sneak preview of Susan Mele's politically incorrect one-woman show, Just Say Blow Me. Beginning tonight, Mele, an impressively versatile performer who moved to Bel Air from California a year ago, returns to the Theatre Project with the full-length version of this anthology of monologues. Mele, who has been compared to Lily Tomlin, co-wrote her solo show with playwright Leah Ryan. Direction is by Kirsten Laurel, with original, live music by Daniel C. Meyer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
Hope everyone had a peaceful, perhaps hangover-nursing Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We were off, too, so that explains the "Week in Nightlife" post coming today. Anyway, on with the shows: On Tuesday, the Guess Who's lead singer Burton Cummings performs a sold-out solo show at Rams Head on Stage in Annapolis. If you're really in need of live music, head south for Bike Trip at D.C.'s Black Cat . On Wednesday, Southern sludge-metal married couple Jucifer plays Sonar's Talking Head Lounge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
We're dealing with good and bad news this week. First, the upside: some decent-sized acts come to town this week. The bad: they're practically all jam-packed into the coming weekend. In other words, choose wisely. On Monday, you don't have many options, but feel free to check out 98 Rock's Noise in the Basement at Baltimore Soundstage. For $5, you can see local bands (this week's include Anoxia, Never Thought and more), drop off your own demo and get an open bar for the first 98 minutes.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | September 12, 2000
JENNIFER BISHOP denies us cheap sentimentality. When she clicks her camera's shutter, she delivers no easy comforts and no reassuring cliches. You want cheap emotions, buy a Hallmark card. You want kittens playing with a ball of yarn, dig up an old Norman Rockwell. Bishop offers wry ironies that look unsettlingly like the truth. She is the anti-Hallmark card, the anti-Norman Rockwell vision of our surroundings. Hey, Norm, put down that paint brush and come look at life! Bishop has been photographing Baltimore and the outer world for the last 23 years, mostly for the City Paper, briefly for the old News American, quite steadily for magazines and design firms and advertising agencies all over the world, and now she has her first solo show - "Men, Women and Children: 20 Years of Photographs" - at the new Photo Works gallery on Chestnut Avenue in the city's Hampden neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | October 18, 1990
The four artists being given solo shows in the intimate Tuttle Gallery of McDonogh School literally and in stylistic terms come from different places. Although their work is not meant to hang together as a thematic whole, this is a somewhat frustrating installation in that it often suggests thematic parallels that are then not followed through.Certainly the most striking of the quartet because of the intensity of his coloration and the clarity of his presentation is San Diego painter Ernest Silva.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
We're dealing with good and bad news this week. First, the upside: some decent-sized acts come to town this week. The bad: they're practically all jam-packed into the coming weekend. In other words, choose wisely. On Monday, you don't have many options, but feel free to check out 98 Rock's Noise in the Basement at Baltimore Soundstage. For $5, you can see local bands (this week's include Anoxia, Never Thought and more), drop off your own demo and get an open bar for the first 98 minutes.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | January 11, 2007
When Josh Lefkowitz talks about Center Stage, he uses terms like "holy moment" and "the birthing of a writer." To be specific, the 25-year-old actor-turned-playwright is referring to something that happened three years ago, when he had a bit part -- basically "pushing scenery" -- in Center Stage's production of Sweeney Todd. Back then, he often visited the dramaturgy office and regaled resident dramaturg Gavin Witt and former literary manager Madeleine Oldham with stories -- tales of odd jobs he'd had while trying to make it as an actor and of his adulation for monologist Spalding Gray.
ENTERTAINMENT
By FRANK RIZZO and FRANK RIZZO,HARTFORD COURANT | April 27, 2006
When Lily Tomlin calls to promote her solo show, which she'll perform Saturday at a benefit for the Music Center at Strathmore, we can't help asking her about other urgent matters. What's going to happen to her character of Debbie Fiderer as The West Wing wraps on May 14? What's this we hear about her singing act with Meryl Streep? And how is her search going for signs of intelligent life in the universe? "With The West Wing ... I haven't seen a script beyond the one we're on now, so I don't know what the last episode will be," says Tomlin, who is calling from her family home in Nashville.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 5, 2003
Follow your fixations. Follow your obsessions." That's the advice given to performance artist Josh Kornbluth two-thirds of the way into his solo show, Ben Franklin: Unplugged. It's advice that the Berkeley-based monologist has followed, not only in this piece - currently at the Theatre Project - but in his entire body of work. For example, there was his fixation on his relationship with his New York Jewish Communist parents (Red Diaper Baby), and there was his fixation on becoming a mathematical genius, which came to an abrupt halt when he was an Ivy League freshman (The Mathematics of Change)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 1, 2001
Audiences who saw the most recent installment of Queer Cafe at the Theatre Project last June got a sneak preview of Susan Mele's politically incorrect one-woman show, Just Say Blow Me. Beginning tonight, Mele, an impressively versatile performer who moved to Bel Air from California a year ago, returns to the Theatre Project with the full-length version of this anthology of monologues. Mele, who has been compared to Lily Tomlin, co-wrote her solo show with playwright Leah Ryan. Direction is by Kirsten Laurel, with original, live music by Daniel C. Meyer.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | September 12, 2000
JENNIFER BISHOP denies us cheap sentimentality. When she clicks her camera's shutter, she delivers no easy comforts and no reassuring cliches. You want cheap emotions, buy a Hallmark card. You want kittens playing with a ball of yarn, dig up an old Norman Rockwell. Bishop offers wry ironies that look unsettlingly like the truth. She is the anti-Hallmark card, the anti-Norman Rockwell vision of our surroundings. Hey, Norm, put down that paint brush and come look at life! Bishop has been photographing Baltimore and the outer world for the last 23 years, mostly for the City Paper, briefly for the old News American, quite steadily for magazines and design firms and advertising agencies all over the world, and now she has her first solo show - "Men, Women and Children: 20 Years of Photographs" - at the new Photo Works gallery on Chestnut Avenue in the city's Hampden neighborhood.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 25, 1994
When the New York debut of her one-woman show, "Fires in the Mirror," was postponed on April 29, 1992, Anna Deavere Smith didn't know that the reason for the postponement would be the genesis of her next show, "Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992."That was the night four police officers were acquitted of beating Rodney King. Riots broke out in south central Los Angeles, and )) aftershocks were feared as far away as New York."Fires in the Mirror" -- subtitled "Crown Heights, Brooklyn and Other Identities" -- went on to win national acclaim for Smith, a Baltimore-born actress, playwright and professor.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | June 7, 1993
There are choreographers who will bend over backward to make their works accessible and audience-friendly. New York choreographer Molissa Fenley is not that type of choreographer or performer.Her three solo works, performed Saturday evening at the Baltimore Museum of Art as the final installment in the "Off the Walls" series, required stamina -- not only from the performer but also from the audience. Her dances are not the kind you can mindlessly slip into; they are abstract, often frustratingly so, and require attention.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 28, 2000
First there was Rob Becker's "Defending the Caveman." Now there's Robert Dubac's "The Male Intellect: An Oxymoron?" Why are men, and not women, taking the stage in these solo shows about the war between the sexes? "Probably because we're a lot more confused," Dubac suggested when we caught up with him last week in the Houston airport, on his way to an engagement in Connecticut. "Intellect" makes its Baltimore debut at the Lyric Opera House for one week, beginning tomorrow. Dubac devised "The Male Intellect" as a way to fill in between acting jobs.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 22, 1995
Has Eric Bogosian been domesticated? Become kinder and gentler?L The idea seems as incongruous as a sheep in wolf's clothing.Yet that's the claim made by this intense, even abrasive %J performer, who's best known for the take-no-prisoners approach his one-man shows."
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