Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSolo Piano
IN THE NEWS

Solo Piano

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
December 3, 2009
MERRY MART: If you don't make it to Holiday Heap on Saturday, you have another chance this weekend to shop for clever crafties and great gifties at The Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave., from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. You'll find everything from wall decor to soap. Admission is free. Go to creativealliance.org. CANTICLE SINGERS: The women's choir known as the Canticle Singers of Baltimore has been a welcome addition to the cultural scene for more than two decades. The ensemble's holiday concert, featuring Benjamin Britten's "A Ceremony of Carols," will be performed at 5:30 p.m. at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St. Tickets are $12 and $15. Call 410-374-9312.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
In 2009, Baltimore singer/songwriter ellen cherry was temporarily sidelined with a nasty throat infection. Unable to sing, she sat down at her upright piano and began writing the songs which would later become her new album, "Please Don't Sell the Piano. " It's about as bare-bones as you can get; while there are a few string arrangements, most of the album is just the piano and cherry's intimate, heartwarming voice. Produced by Baltimore Americana singer/songwriter Caleb Stine, "Please Don't Sell the Piano" is cherry's most personal album.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Special to the Sun | February 21, 1994
Anthony Stark is well known to area music lovers as managing director of the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore and a member of the music faculty of the College of Notre Dame. On Saturday night, his talents as composer and performer were showcased at LeClerc Hall in "An Evening with Anthony Stark."The program consisted entirely of Mr. Stark's piano compositions. In the first half, Mr. Stark performed "Three Waltzes," subtitled "Emily's Waltz" (1983), and "Moriniana: deux valses diversiones" (1979)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
The boy was 11, already well along in his process of discovering music, when he found himself alone at home one day, listening to a piece by one of history's great romantics. He couldn't explain it, but something in the sounds of Frederic Chopin's Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Opus 23 — as played by Polish musician Witold Malcuzynsky — struck Brian Ganz like a bolt from stormy skies. "It was mysterious, sort of soulful, and I actually, literally, doubled over in pain," says Ganz, an internationally celebrated concert pianist who lives in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 3, 1998
It's not unusual for an important soloist to contribute his services free of charge to an important orchestra's pension fund concert. But it's remarkable when three star soloists show up, each to play a single concerted work and then join forces after intermission to perform a piece of music as unglamorous as Beethoven's Concerto in C Major for violin, cello and piano.But last night's pension fund concert for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was not an ordinary occasion -- and that is why three celebrated soloists (cellist Yo-Yo Ma, pianist Emanuel Ax and violinist Pamela Frank)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 5, 2001
Billy Joel's debut on disc as a classical composer is apt to leave you in a Chopin state of mind. Not to mention Liszt, Schumann and, for a minute, Bach. As for Joel, this just-released recording -Fantasies and Delusions: Music for Solo Piano (Sony Classical CK 85397) - doesn't offer much of a clue. If he has a truly original musical idea in his head, he isn't sharing it here. When Joel, one of pop music's leading lights, announced years ago that he was heading into the classical realm (his last pop record was in 1993)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 24, 1994
There's a certain kind of concert reviewers dread. You are in utter agony: your ears hurt, your muscles cramp, your seat seems made for a Lilliputian, and, of course, you can't go to sleep. Only one thing gives you hope of salvation: the expectation that eventually you will see the musicians turn to the last page of the score that torments you.Such was this listener's situation during most of last night's concert by Polaris at Goucher College. Fortunately, the worst came first: Judith Shatin's unspeakably strident "1492" for percussion and piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 25, 1999
It is 40 years since Leon Fleisher's appointment as Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Piano at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. The conservatory celebrates the anniversary this week with a three-day festival in Fleisher's honor.The festival concludes Wednesday evening with a black-tie, by- invitation-only dinner in the George Peabody Library. Actress Claire Bloom will act as mistress of ceremonies to titled nobility and musical luminaries who have come from all over the globe to honor Fleisher.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
The boy was 11, already well along in his process of discovering music, when he found himself alone at home one day, listening to a piece by one of history's great romantics. He couldn't explain it, but something in the sounds of Frederic Chopin's Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Opus 23 — as played by Polish musician Witold Malcuzynsky — struck Brian Ganz like a bolt from stormy skies. "It was mysterious, sort of soulful, and I actually, literally, doubled over in pain," says Ganz, an internationally celebrated concert pianist who lives in Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
In 2009, Baltimore singer/songwriter ellen cherry was temporarily sidelined with a nasty throat infection. Unable to sing, she sat down at her upright piano and began writing the songs which would later become her new album, "Please Don't Sell the Piano. " It's about as bare-bones as you can get; while there are a few string arrangements, most of the album is just the piano and cherry's intimate, heartwarming voice. Produced by Baltimore Americana singer/songwriter Caleb Stine, "Please Don't Sell the Piano" is cherry's most personal album.
FEATURES
December 3, 2009
MERRY MART: If you don't make it to Holiday Heap on Saturday, you have another chance this weekend to shop for clever crafties and great gifties at The Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave., from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. You'll find everything from wall decor to soap. Admission is free. Go to creativealliance.org. CANTICLE SINGERS: The women's choir known as the Canticle Singers of Baltimore has been a welcome addition to the cultural scene for more than two decades. The ensemble's holiday concert, featuring Benjamin Britten's "A Ceremony of Carols," will be performed at 5:30 p.m. at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St. Tickets are $12 and $15. Call 410-374-9312.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 5, 2001
Billy Joel's debut on disc as a classical composer is apt to leave you in a Chopin state of mind. Not to mention Liszt, Schumann and, for a minute, Bach. As for Joel, this just-released recording -Fantasies and Delusions: Music for Solo Piano (Sony Classical CK 85397) - doesn't offer much of a clue. If he has a truly original musical idea in his head, he isn't sharing it here. When Joel, one of pop music's leading lights, announced years ago that he was heading into the classical realm (his last pop record was in 1993)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 25, 1999
It is 40 years since Leon Fleisher's appointment as Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Piano at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. The conservatory celebrates the anniversary this week with a three-day festival in Fleisher's honor.The festival concludes Wednesday evening with a black-tie, by- invitation-only dinner in the George Peabody Library. Actress Claire Bloom will act as mistress of ceremonies to titled nobility and musical luminaries who have come from all over the globe to honor Fleisher.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 3, 1998
It's not unusual for an important soloist to contribute his services free of charge to an important orchestra's pension fund concert. But it's remarkable when three star soloists show up, each to play a single concerted work and then join forces after intermission to perform a piece of music as unglamorous as Beethoven's Concerto in C Major for violin, cello and piano.But last night's pension fund concert for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was not an ordinary occasion -- and that is why three celebrated soloists (cellist Yo-Yo Ma, pianist Emanuel Ax and violinist Pamela Frank)
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Special to the Sun | February 21, 1994
Anthony Stark is well known to area music lovers as managing director of the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore and a member of the music faculty of the College of Notre Dame. On Saturday night, his talents as composer and performer were showcased at LeClerc Hall in "An Evening with Anthony Stark."The program consisted entirely of Mr. Stark's piano compositions. In the first half, Mr. Stark performed "Three Waltzes," subtitled "Emily's Waltz" (1983), and "Moriniana: deux valses diversiones" (1979)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 24, 1994
There's a certain kind of concert reviewers dread. You are in utter agony: your ears hurt, your muscles cramp, your seat seems made for a Lilliputian, and, of course, you can't go to sleep. Only one thing gives you hope of salvation: the expectation that eventually you will see the musicians turn to the last page of the score that torments you.Such was this listener's situation during most of last night's concert by Polaris at Goucher College. Fortunately, the worst came first: Judith Shatin's unspeakably strident "1492" for percussion and piano.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | October 7, 1994
For years, American music lovers have paid far greater homage to their 20th-century masters than to late 19th-century composers such as Amy Beach. But more attention is being lavished on the last century these days.A top-notch recording of Ms. Beach's "Gaelic" Symphony, chock full of Irish melodies, is available in a delightful performance by the Detroit Symphony under the direction of Neeme Jarvi.(Chandos 8958)Mr. Jarvi also has recorded the delightful Third Symphony of George Whitefield Chadwick (1854-1931)
NEWS
July 15, 2005
Roman Lebedev, a concert pianist and teacher, died of a heart attack July 8 at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 62. Born in what is now St. Petersburg, Russia, he began his piano studies at the age of 6. At 14, he entered the Leningrad Music School for Talented Youth, and he received a master's degree and doctorate from the Leningrad Conservatory. At the age of 25, he began to teach at the conservatory - remaining for 37 years as professor of solo piano. He came to Baltimore in 1989 as a guest artist at what is now Towson University and settled here in 1992.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.