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By Susan Stewart and Susan Stewart,Special to the sun | December 10, 1995
"At Eighty Two: A Journal," by May Sarton. W.W. Norton. Illustrated. 320 pages. $23 This is the last work of May Sarton, who died in July 1995 at the age of 83. The author of 52 volumes of poetry, novels and works for children, Ms. Sarton wanted to be remembered as a poet. Yet it is her eight journals, beginning in 1968 with "Plant Dreaming Deep," that will be her most enduring contribution to literature. As exercises in the genre, the journals rank with, and at times resemble, the work of Colette in their loving attention to plants and animals and their acute recording of emotion.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 31, 2011
For a couple of days, between the time Irene roared through and someone on our street decided to fire up a noisy generator, my neighborhood had been as quiet as when our houses were new and occupied by large families of long-gone Baltimoreans who had few electrical amenities. That's an assumption, of course, but an informed one. Most of these houses were built early in the 20th century, long before television or computers, before electric dryers, even before the expansion of commercial radio.
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NEWS
By Ken Colston | October 8, 1991
THERE HAS been another advance in the technology of solitude.In Denver, it is now possible to rent a movie without going to the video store. A person can choose from a catalog, make a call, give a credit card number and wait for the selection to appear on the cable TV. The whole process takes less time than popping a bag of low-fat microwave popcorn.If the idea comes to Annapolis, I won't subscribe. I would prefer fetching my movie rentals in person at the video store for some of the same reasons that I now prefer seeing them on the big screen with an audience.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2011
Mathilde B. "Mimi" Lee, who as the wife of Lt. Gov. Blair Lee III eschewed the political pomp and circumstance of Annapolis for the fields and woods where she could hike, canoe and swim, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at Laurel Regional Hospital. The Silver Spring resident was 91. Mathilde Boal was named for her paternal grandmother, who was related to Christopher Columbus. Her father, Pierre de Lagarde Boal, was an American diplomat who had served as ambassador to Nicaragua and Bolivia.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2004
COLLEGE PARK - If you happened to be making your way across the University of Maryland's vast campus this summer, and you tuned in to the student radio station, WMUC (88.1 FM), you might have been lucky enough to catch "DJ Solitude" spinning one of his eclectic play lists. "Solitude" - as his listeners call him - is no commercial DJ. His tastes are diverse, and his musical IQ is vast. He loves to keep the people guessing, so he'll start off a set with Company Flow's 8 Steps to Perfection, then sandwich some Tribe Called Quest between Johnny Cash and Garth Brooks.
NEWS
By Robin Stratton | June 12, 1992
I push hard against this womb now grown too small to nourish grown-up life * my roots are buried in now and forever as I reach for the moon * my words put all their feathers on to greet you but you merely hovered * handmaid, housemaid, bed maid or mate (does it matter) this is not my life * always the single bed -- the table set for -- one what is the meaning? * solitude can be a birthing place -- or tomb -- for such as you and me
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | June 25, 2009
One short weekend, so much to do - an invitation to go swimming at night by moonlight, the Iran protest march downtown with our mouths taped shut, a dance at the Eagles Club with a hot horn band playing '70s funk that propels people onto the dance floor as if shot from guns - but here I am stuck with houseguests who are unable to sit in a room without me for more than 15 minutes. They follow me around like faithful collies. We ran out of conversation on Friday and they're here until Wednesday.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film critic | February 7, 1991
It wasn't the nose. It wasn't the wit. It wasn't the romance. It was the solitude.In "Cyrano de Bergerac," director Jean-Paul Rappeneau saw not a great romantic -- but a big-time lonely guy."This appealed to me," said Rappeneau, speaking from Paris through an interpreter, "a man imprisoned in his own solitude. The authentic Cyrano was an artist who lived alone and died alone. There's something about the death of an artist that I can relate to. I too am a solitary and as Cyrano tries to fight his own loneliness, I try to fight mine."
NEWS
By James Sallis | December 11, 1990
Fort Worth, Texas.-- STARING DEEPLY into my eyes she told me, ''I put your number in the Rolodex today.''Not quite the declaration of undying love I'd hoped for -- something along the lines of ''I've waited for you all my life,'' perhaps -- but with age, our perspective on these things changes. We become either more desperate or calmer. More desperate didn't seem humanly possible, so I was working on calm.And for Susan, even though, as she pointed out, leaves were forever falling from that Rolodex never to be seen again, inclusion therein was signal.
NEWS
By Michael Anft | July 18, 1993
FALLING OFF THE MAP:SOME LONELY PLACESOF THE WORLDPico IyerKnopf190 pages,$20In Paraguay, Pico Iyer relates, "Everything could be had for a hTC price," and "the latest boom market was in babies." Icelanders, meanwhile, "believe that rolling naked in the dew will cure you of nineteen separate ailments." And in Vietnam, "It's 93 degrees outside, it's April 8th and you're listening to a Vietnamese cover version of 'Jingle Bells' " while people drink "coffee made from beans vomited up by a weasel."
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | June 25, 2009
One short weekend, so much to do - an invitation to go swimming at night by moonlight, the Iran protest march downtown with our mouths taped shut, a dance at the Eagles Club with a hot horn band playing '70s funk that propels people onto the dance floor as if shot from guns - but here I am stuck with houseguests who are unable to sit in a room without me for more than 15 minutes. They follow me around like faithful collies. We ran out of conversation on Friday and they're here until Wednesday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 9, 2009
Edward William Eldridge Jr. took his own life at the age of 62. He lived alone in a small semidetached, red-brick house on Daywalt Avenue in Northeast Baltimore. He had no wife, no known children, no brothers, no sisters, and his parents died years ago. He listed his only aunt as a beneficiary, but she, too, had passed away. He had no friends, at least none close enough or willing enough to stay with him at the hospital for a few hours so he could undergo the arthroscopic knee surgery he was scheduled to have on the day he died.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | July 22, 2008
I drove out to the future of grocery stores yesterday, but when I stopped for gas, I ended up on a detour to the past. There wasn't anywhere on the gas pump to stick my credit card, so I just started filling up, marveling that there was still a place where they trusted you to pay after rather than before. But then - cue the Twilight Zone music - a ghost appeared. Well, not a real ghost, but what seems like one these days: an actual human asking if he could help me. Turns out I had driven into what must be one of the last full-service stations around here.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | September 16, 2007
Edward Hopper was the greatest American realist painter of the 20th century. Yet to label Hopper a realist also risks misstating the peculiar quality of his genius. The world of Hopper's paintings feels deeply familiar, but it is also deeply strange - preternaturally silent, austere and inward looking, peopled by isolated, disconnected individuals trapped in moods of reverie, anticipation or despair in unprepossessing spaces that only emphasize the emotional distance between them. Hopper's most famous images - lonely city storefronts and apartment buildings, lamp-lit hotel rooms and offices, gingerbread seaside homes and rocky beaches splashed by slanting shafts of sunlight - are the stuff of realistic depiction, but he also made them uncanny, as if they were clues to a riddle that we can never quite unravel.
FEATURES
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
Summertime in Ocean City and Rehoboth Beach: Barely an inch of blanket space on the beach, little kids kicking sand in your face and a crush of foot traffic trampling down the boardwalk. Is this really getting away? Plenty of quieter coastal options do exist. Among those: Lewes, Broadkill and Slaughter beaches in Delaware and Assateaugue seashore in Maryland. On a recent weekday afternoon, barely a dozen people were at Delaware's Slaughter Beach. Sylvia Smith and her granddaughter Khari Vance were two of them.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | April 15, 2006
Renata Chlumska has looked down on the world from its highest point. Now she's seeing the United States from sea level. With a battered red kayak as her constant companion, the Swedish athlete is making her way around the perimeter of the country, an 11,000-mile journey just beyond its halfway point. When bad weather or terrain prevent her from paddling, she hitches her 240-pound load to a harness and pulls it behind her as she mountain-bikes or in-line skates. Early yesterday morning, she paddled into Maryland with a full moon illuminating a sparkling welcome mat from southern Assateague Island to Ocean City.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 21, 1994
Iced in again, huh? Home with the kids again, eh? Running a cabin-fever, are you? Eyes glazing over? Brain lame? Here's something to stir you awake. It's a quiz. Just for fun. Just to jump-start your brain. A little treat from your bottom-of-the-page columnist. It's a mildly amusing way to pass a winter's day or, hopefully, an entire weekend. Answers will appear in Monday's This Just In. So, if you get stuck, call friends or relatives. Or, have the neighbors over, make some grilled cheese sandwiches and have a Dan Rodricks Quiz Party.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
O Lord, open my lips And my mouth shall declare your praise. For centuries, monks have mouthed these words as they begin their daily regimen of prayer in the pre-dawn hours. The Liturgy of the Hours -- Psalms and prayers recited at set hours -- fixed the rhythm of their day, from rising to rest. Also called the Divine Office, the prayers have for the most part been the preserve of Roman Catholic priests, deacons, nuns and brothers. But the Office is being discovered by Catholic lay people, such as those who gather every day for Morning Prayer at St. Clement Mary Hofbauer parish in Rosedale, or for Evening Prayer at St. Benedict parish in Southwest Baltimore.
TOPIC
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - Anyone can surreptitiously snap your picture with a cell phone. Police can watch you through surveillance cameras. Credit-card issuers can examine your financial history, and online booksellers can compile data on your reading habits. Each day, it seems, our privacy erodes further as intrusive new technologies peer more deeply into our lives. But while it may not seem so, we are in many ways living in a golden era of privacy - a time when affluent Americans are enjoying more personal privacy than their grandparents ever could have imagined.
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