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By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | November 2, 1997
FALL IS the time to clean up from old projects and start dreaming about new ones, and the time to put away the old tools and dream about getting new ones.To make sure you have something to dream about, here are some items from our mailbag:* Used to be that solid wood cabinets came in two colors: wood tones and white painted. Now, however, according to the Hardwood Manufacturers Association, color is making a big splash in wood cabinets. Colors such as red, yellow, blue and pale blue, green, pale green, and even black are showing up in wood cabinet lines.
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By CAROLYN BIGDA | August 7, 2005
PICKING UP the glossy catalogs, I can't help but drool: rooms furnished in coordinating colors; sofas that beg you to settle in and snooze; and afghans, throw pillows and other accouterments that say it's not just a room but a home. My mouth goes dry, though, when I glance at the $500 price tag just for the coffee table. Furnishing an apartment or new home is an expensive venture. But don't let those catalogs fool you. There are ways to fill your space without draining your savings (or going deeply into debt)
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BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | August 7, 2005
PICKING UP the glossy catalogs, I can't help but drool: rooms furnished in coordinating colors; sofas that beg you to settle in and snooze; and afghans, throw pillows and other accouterments that say it's not just a room but a home. My mouth goes dry, though, when I glance at the $500 price tag just for the coffee table. Furnishing an apartment or new home is an expensive venture. But don't let those catalogs fool you. There are ways to fill your space without draining your savings (or going deeply into debt)
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | November 2, 1997
FALL IS the time to clean up from old projects and start dreaming about new ones, and the time to put away the old tools and dream about getting new ones.To make sure you have something to dream about, here are some items from our mailbag:* Used to be that solid wood cabinets came in two colors: wood tones and white painted. Now, however, according to the Hardwood Manufacturers Association, color is making a big splash in wood cabinets. Colors such as red, yellow, blue and pale blue, green, pale green, and even black are showing up in wood cabinet lines.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzieand Randy Johnson | December 15, 1990
When you first start looking at them, kitchen cabinets may seem to come in a bewildering array of styles and materials. If you don't already have a clear idea of what you want, you may be dazed by the choices.As you shop around, however, you'll begin to see some patterns. Think of it as an old-fashioned Chinese menu: one from Column A, one from Column B, one from Column C.Column A is finish. Cabinets really come in only three basic finishes: solid wood, veneer and laminates.Column B is color.
NEWS
By Michael Walsh and By Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | May 12, 2002
Pitched, arched, domed, coffered, trussed or beamed, a shapely ceiling can be a refreshing -- and impressive -- alternative to a flat and featureless overhead surface. If you're planning a new home or a major remodel of an old one, incorporating an "articulated" ceiling can add high-altitude drama and substantial architectural interest. But there are several cosmetic ceiling treatment options that require few if any structural changes. Even these seemingly minor improvements can exert a powerful visual influence on a room, and at a relatively low cost.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1996
How did veneer get such a bad name? One of the ironies of the furniture business is that the general public considers veneered pieces to be inferior to solid-wood construction. The reality, however, is that the most beautiful, durable and expensive furniture in the world is made with this process.So why do people sneer at veneer? It's mostly because the process of gluing thin slices of wood to a base has only been perfected in the last few decades. And unfortunately, there's still a lot of poor-quality veneer out there.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 7, 2009
Million Elliott Daneker Sr., former partner in a Harford County clock-making firm that produced thousands of grandfather, grandmother, mantle and steeple clocks for more than three decades, died Friday of cancer at his Fallston home. He was 94. Mr. Daneker was born in Baltimore and raised in Bel Air. He was a 1933 graduate of Bel Air High School and attended the University of Maryland, College Park. "He explained that he got his name from his mother, who liked the song 'I Found a Million Dollar Baby in a Five and Ten Cent Store,' which she always played on the piano," said his son, Million Elliott Daneker Jr., who lives in Bel Air. During World War II, he worked as an assembly-line worker, building airplanes at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1999
The contractor who built a deck that collapsed during a Memorial Day cookout in Cockeysville failed to obtain a permit for the project, bypassing a required inspection that could have revealed the construction problem that caused the collapse, Baltimore County officials said yesterday.The deck collapsed because it was not properly anchored to the back of the townhouse, said John M. Altmeyer, supervisor of code inspection and enforcement.Altmeyer said the contractor, Decked Out, was issued a violation notice yesterday -- with a $1,000 fine -- for failing to obtain the permit.
NEWS
June 3, 1999
TO MANY builders and homeowners, building permits and inspections are annoyances best avoided if possible. The Memorial Day collapse of a 12-foot by 14-foot deck in Cockeysville that injured seven people, including a man burned by a falling grill, demonstrates the danger in that thinking.The deck, built four months ago, collapsed because it was secured into thin particle board sheathing rather than to the house's solid wood frame. Baltimore County code and enforcement officials say their inspectors might have been able to catch that fundamental flaw had they examined the deck.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzieand Randy Johnson | December 15, 1990
When you first start looking at them, kitchen cabinets may seem to come in a bewildering array of styles and materials. If you don't already have a clear idea of what you want, you may be dazed by the choices.As you shop around, however, you'll begin to see some patterns. Think of it as an old-fashioned Chinese menu: one from Column A, one from Column B, one from Column C.Column A is finish. Cabinets really come in only three basic finishes: solid wood, veneer and laminates.Column B is color.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | December 5, 1994
Enola Gay Carrasco's first Christmas in her new home won't be the same without Rudolph.The 5-foot-tall red-nosed reindeer was stolen from the front porch of her bungalow on Overbrook Road in Idlewylde yesterday morning.It had been Rudolph's first weekend on the job. Mrs. Carrasco bought the solid wood decoration just weeks earlier at a %J Timonium crafts fair.The reindeer rustler also walked off with a lighted Santa flag and an extension cord."We woke up and I was crying and my 9-year-old daughter Angela was crying," said Mrs. Carrasco, a former Rosedale resident.
BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | July 16, 2012
It seems that no multi-million dollar house is complete these days without a wet bar, and the home that recently sold on Ivy Reach Court in Cockeysville is no exception. Here at the Real Estate Wonk, we're into our second month of featuring some of the most expensive homes sold each month in the Baltimore area, and being the sleuths we are, we noticed this recurring theme. (A wet bar is one that comes with a sink and running water.) Check out the pictures to see the one at this house.
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