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By Carolyn Melago and Carolyn Melago,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 8, 1997
The Rev. Bill Hayman was puzzled last month when a man called his office claiming to represent the Coalition for Compassion, requesting donations for a needy woman. That's because Hayman is a supervisor for the Coalition for Compassion, a group that distributes money to Howard County residents who can't pay utility, rent or prescription-drug bills."He told me he was calling for the Coalition for Compassion, which I thought was awfully strange," said Hayman, pastor of Lutheran Church of the Living Word in Columbia.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
A longtime minority contracting advocate has filed a lawsuit against Baltimore and the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation, alleging the creation of a new baseball field in Park Heights is bypassing competitive bidding requirements. In the lawsuit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, Arnold M. Jolivet alleges the city violated the law when awarding the $2 million project to develop a youth ballpark near Pimlico Race Course . "Mayor Rawlings‐Blake and the Board of Estimates simply voted to award the contract to the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation, Inc., completely without seeking any competitive bids from other interested and qualified bidders," Jolivet's lawsuit states.
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NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | January 21, 1991
A FEW DAYS ago I was leaving for an appointment -- and already late -- when I realized I had to make a quick phone call. A second before I reached the phone, it rang. I picked it up, only to hear a recorded message soliciting supplementary Medicare insurance. Annoyed, I hung up, waited a few seconds, picked up the phone again. The message was still on. Now furious, I hung up once more, then tried a third time. The vocal juggernaut continued, finally ending after more than a minute and a half.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
The city of Baltimore agreed Wednesday to pay $100,000 to a West Baltimore family whose special-needs student died after falling from a moving school bus in 2010. City Solicitor George Nilson said school officials knew that Jeremy C. Jennings Jr., the emotionally disturbed 6-year-old, needed to be restrained on the bus but failed to do so. "A young, vulnerable child was sent off to school and didn't return home through no fault of his own," said Nilson, a member of the city Board of Estimates.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN REPORTER | May 22, 2007
The Baltimore County Council approved a measure last night designed to crack down on people who ask for donations from motorists stopped at traffic lights. The bill, approved unanimously, will make it a misdemeanor to ask for money on county-owned roads without having a county permit. Violators would face a $100 criminal fine. Under a county law passed last summer, solicitors must obtain a license from the Department of Permits and Development Management or face a civil fine of $100. Those who receive a citation could appeal to a hearing examiner, and then to the county Board of Appeals.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1995
A federal judge yesterday threw out Ocean City's ban on boardwalk solicitors and questioned the City Council's motive in passing it.The law, approved in early May, prohibited jugglers, musicians, politicians and others from soliciting on the boardwalk during peak summer months. Backed by the American Civil Liberties Union, solicitors sued, saying that the law violated their right of free speech.Council members claimed they were merely trying to deal with burgeoning boardwalk traffic and the safety problems that had resulted.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
Using the telephone, the solicitors talked fast, claiming t represent several local organizations in St. Mary's County. When someone agreed to buy tickets to "A Christmas Carol," a runner was dispatched immediately to pick up the money.These are the signs of "a classic telemarketing scam," according to Maryland Secretary of State Winfield M. Kelly Jr., and in close-knit St. Mary's County residents quickly became suspicious.Complaints came into the sheriff's office the first day of operations, an investigation started the next day, and the operation was closed within a week.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
When John J. Costa agreed to buy a $29.95 package of seasonings to benefit the Maryland Troopers Association, he didn't realize that the group would get only $3.86. The rest went to a Tennessee company that makes food products and employs telemarketers to sell them in Maryland and elsewhere."Now I really feel ripped off," said Mr. Costa, a retired executive who lives in Hagerstown.Mr. Costa is one of thousands of Marylanders who have agreed to buy products to support the troopers, whose association receives only 12.89 percent of the proceeds.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
County Council Democrats have asked County Solicito Barbara Cook to take over their appeal of a judge's decision invalidating the council's redistricting plan.Council Republicans are incensed that the decision to invite Ms. Cook into the case appears to have been made without them. Not that their input would have made a difference, since all council votes on the 1994 redistricting plan have been 3-2 along party lines.What is stirring the ire of Darrel Drown, R-2nd, and Charles C. Feaga, R-5th, is that no vote was taken regarding Ms. Cook.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1994
Baltimore City Solicitor Neal M. Janey says he only wanted to err on the safe side.But supporters of Council President Mary Pat Clarke call his request for extensive details on a Board of Estimates item involving her husband a deliberate political attack."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
James Roderick Crook Jr., a retired attorney for Baltimore City and a World War II veteran, died of stroke complications Wednesday at the Edenwald Retirement Community. The Guilford resident was 91. Born in Baltimore and raised in Oakenshawe, he attended the old Mount Washington School for Boys and SS. Philip and James School before graduating from Loyola High School in 1942. He earned a bachelor's degree at what is now Loyola University Maryland and was a graduate of the Georgetown University School of Law. While in college he earned a pilot's license and enlisted in the Navy during World War II. He became a lieutenant commander and served in the South Pacific aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise.
NEWS
August 16, 2012
It was with disgust that I read the comments of the city solicitor, George Nilson, that you published in on August 7 ("City panel plans to vote down settlement for teen whom police left shoeless in Howard Co. ") regarding the rejection of a police misconduct settlement. The city's highest law officer stated in open court something that many of us knew all along - that the Board of Estimates is simply a rubber stamp for the mayor of Baltimore because majority of this Board (three out of five members)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake continued to spar Monday over the purchase of phone-related equipment by the mayor's technology office, purchases Pratt says violate city procurement regulations. Pratt, who has released records documenting the purchase of hundreds of thousands of dollars of phone equipment, said she disagreed with City Solicitor George Nilson's recent written opinion that the transaction was appropriate. "Mr Nilson can describe this purchase in any way that he wishes, but the fact remains that there was no basis for the Mayor's Office of Information Technology to procure a telephone system outside the charter-mandated process," Pratt said Monday after a meeting of the city's spending board.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Baltimore's city solicitor defended Friday the purchase of high-tech phones and other equipment by MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration - an expense that has been questioned by another top City Hall official. George A. Nilson said the purchase of video phones and other equipment "was neither out of the ordinary, nor in violation of law. " The purchase was made under a contract for computer equipment, which Nilson argued was allowed because the phones could be considered computer hardware.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
Baltimore's Board of Estimates on Wednesday approved a $70,000 payout to three people, including a 2-year-old, injured by police during an arrest on charges of trespassing. City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young voted against the payment, because he believes more training of police needs to done to prevent such lawsuits, Young's spokesman said. At issue were the events of Aug. 28, 2009 at about 5 p.m. when two Baltimore police officers arrested Tyrode Gibbs Sr., who was sitting on the front steps of a vacant property along with his 2-year-old son, Tyrode Gibbs Jr., according to Board of Estimates documents.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 14, 2011
H. Emslie "Lee" Parks, former Baltimore County attorney and school board president who was also a highly regarded litigator, died Monday of cancer at Rutledge on Wye, his Queenstown home. The longtime Granite resident was 81. The son of a lawyer and a schoolteacher, Mr. Parks was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. He was a 1949 graduate of St. Paul's School and earned a bachelor's degree in business from the Johns Hopkins University in 1953. After earning a degree in 1956 from the University of Maryland School of Law and entering the Maryland Bar, he began practicing law with his father, Zadoc Townsend Parks Jr., and two years later, became a partner in the firm of Parks and Parks in their One Charles Center office in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2002
THIS TIME I'm directing my fire at the traffic-hopping fund-raisers for almost everything you can name," said Don Oliver, who lives in Columbia. "I first encountered it on U.S. 29 at Route 198 where local firefighters were collecting for Jerry's Kids before the Labor Day weekend a few years ago. Since then, there has been a proliferation of traffic hoppers snarling up intersections and collecting money for almost everything you might imagine. "One group commonly on the median is collecting for `The Family,' whatever that is. Another group at the same intersection claims to be collecting for women and children.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Benjamin L. Brown, former District Court judge and city solicitor who served for 13 years as Baltimore's chief legal counsel during the administration of William Donald Schaefer, died of cancer yesterday at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Roland Park. He was 72 and lived in Mount Washington. "He was an institution, and we're going to miss him," said Mayor Martin O'Malley. "He was a total gentleman who cared deeply about the city and brought a tremendous amount of knowledge to his work." In 1999, Mr. O'Malley appointed Mr. Brown to the transition team for the Baltimore solicitor's office.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2011
When Jodi Ceglia received a telephone call recently with the person at the other end soliciting funds for the "Ellicott City Fire Department", she did not question how the money was going to be used. In fact, she did exactly what the caller asked — she wrote a check made out to "Howard County Firefighters" and taped an envelope with her contribution to her front door to be picked up the next day. "He made it clear that the money was going to 'stay in my backyard,' that it was going to be used in Ellicott City," Ceglia recalled.
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