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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
An Army officer from Eldersburg was among five soldiers killed in a helicopter crash earlier this week in Afghanistan, the Defense Department said late Saturday. Capt. Sara M. Knutson, 27, died Monday in Kandahar, the Pentagon said in a release. Knutson was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga. Knutson, a 2003 graduate of Liberty High School and a 2007 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, is the first Marylander killed in Afghanistan this year.
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EXPLORE
February 12, 2013
Army 1st Lt. Edmund Carazo has returned to the United States after his deployment overseas at a forward operating base, serving in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, the official name given to anti-terrorism military operations involving U.S. troops and allied coalition partners. With eight years of military service, Carazo is an infantry officer assigned to the 4th Airborne Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. The son of Nancy Carazo, of Laurel, he is a 1999 graduate of Meade High School and received his bachelor's in 2004 from Towson University and master's in 2008 from Troy University, in Alabama..
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
The Army is planning to move an over-the-horizon radar system, with more than 100 soldiers and a pair of giant, blimp-like aerostats that fly as high as two miles up, to Aberdeen Proving Ground in the fall, Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger said Thursday. Ruppersberger, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said commanders chose the Army base in Harford County for the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System, or JLENS, because offers FAA-approved restricted airspace and allows for testing weapons tracking over water.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 31, 2013
What if, during the presidential campaign, Mitt Romney had accused President Barack Obama of wanting to let servicewomen serve in combat? After all, Mr. Obama had hinted as much in 2008. What would Mr. Obama's response have been? My hunch is that he would have accused Mr. Romney of practicing the "politics of division" or some such and denied it. In any case, wouldn't an open debate have been better than putting women into combat by fiat? You'd think the folks who are always clamoring for a "national conversation" on this, that and the other thing would prefer to make a sweeping change after, you know, a national conversation.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
A soldier who lost all of his limbs in the Iraq War received double arm transplants at Johns Hopkins Hospital last month in a rare procedure that has already begun to restore some normalcy to his life. Hopkins doctors are to speak in detail about the rare procedure performed on 26-year-old Brendan Marrocco in a press briefing today. The Army infantryman lost his arms and legs in a roadside bomb attack in 2009 becoming the first soldier of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars to lose all four limbs in combat and survive.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Brendan Marrocco sometimes looks down at his arms and can't believe they really exist. Until six weeks ago, the 26-year-old didn't have arms. He lost both of his, as well as his legs, in the Iraq War when the armored vehicle he was driving ran over a bomb in 2009. He was the first soldier of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars to lose all four limbs in combat and survive. But Marrocco has arms again because of a rare double transplant performed by a team of surgeons at Johns Hopkins Hospital on Dec. 18. Marrocco wheeled himself into a media briefing Tuesday using his new limbs.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
At first, the soldier's behavior was puzzling. He appeared to be having hallucinations. He was anxious. He became belligerent. A drug test identified the problem: The young man had become the latest service member at Fort Meade to experience an adverse reaction to synthetic marijuana. Commanders at the Army base in Anne Arundel County, home to the National Security Agency, the U.S. Cyber Command and other sensitive activities, are cracking down on cheap, widely available and dangerous marijuana substitutes that have been linked nationally to suicides and homicides.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
In November, more than 700 high school boys and girls lacrosse players on 46 teams - and over 400 adult volunteers, supporters, active military, alumni and spectators - came together to raise more than $65,000 for two severely wounded Connecticut soldiers, including U.S. Army Capt. Gregory Galeazzi , a 2007 graduate of Loyola's Army ROTC program, at the seventh annual Sticks for Soldiers Thanksgiving Lacrosse Tournament in Fairfield, Conn. Both soldiers were seriously wounded with bilateral leg amputations and other injuries in separate IED explosions in Afghanistan in 2011 A video website called HooplaHa , which calls itself a "good news" site, created an original video about the event, which you can watch below.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
As a woman in the Army, Staff Sgt. Jennifer Hunt is barred from serving in the infantry. But that didn't stop commanders in Afghanistan from tapping her when they needed a female soldier to accompany men on their door-kicking missions. Hunt's job on those house-to-house raids was to search any women and girls they came across. Not having trained with the teams, she says, made the work more dangerous. "The infantry operates together," she said. "Then I get kind of dropped in on them, and I don't know what their operating procedures are. If 'X' happens, what is their reaction to it?"
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2012
This Christmas will be the first one in a long time that Sgt. 1st Class Jeff Lopus will be spending at home with his wife, Mary, and their four children. During his 18 years in the Army, the 41-year-old Lopus he has served in Somalia, Haiti, South Korea, Germany, Afghanistan and Iraq. He returned from Iraq in April. And for the second year in a row, his house is being decorated for free by a kindhearted retired Baltimore County police officer. Rob Schmidt, who lives in Forest Hill, retired about a year and a half ago after 25 years on the Baltimore County force.
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