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SPORTS
By Colleen Thomas and The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
After a 4 a.m. hot dog-eating contest, a game featuring Major League Lacrosse players, and 24 consecutive hours of lacrosse to support veterans, Tyler Steinhardt can finally sleep. The second annual Shootout for Soldiers event at McDonogh, which went from 9 a.m. Thursday until 9 a.m. Friday, raised $126,000 for the Wounded Warrior Project, according to Steinhardt, the event's organizer. The amount surpassed last year's total of $120,000. The event had over 2,000 participants and thousands more spectators, Steinhardt said, including an appearance by Ravens coach John Harbaugh.
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SPORTS
By Colleen Thomas, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
U.S. Army Spc. Calvin Todd's trip to the second annual Shootout for Soldiers event was the longest, most difficult journey of the thousands of people who came to McDonogh on Thursday for the 24-hour lacrosse event. After losing a leg while serving in Afghanistan last October, Todd came to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda to rehabilitate and heard about the event through a friend while coaching lacrosse. Todd contacted Tyler Steinhardt, the event's creator, to see if he could help out, and their friendship took off from there.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger has a lot on his mind. As the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, he's had to defend the secret domestic surveillance program revealed to British Newspaper The Guardian by a former Maryland resident . And he's considering a run for governor . But on Thursday, he'll take time out for an event that, according to his news release, combines two "life-long passions: serving our troops and...
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
A young man comes to Maryland, takes some community college classes, uses his computer skills to get a job in which he gains a security clearance. Still in his 20s, he finds information about government activity that troubles him. He decides to share it with the world. In its broad outlines, the case of Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old intelligence contractor who last week revealed the existence of two top secret National Security Agency eavesdropping programs, hews closely to the contours set by Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the 25-year-old soldier now being court-martialed at Fort Meade for releasing hundreds of thousands of classified documents.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
An Army prosecutor told a military judge Monday that Pfc. Bradley Manning drew on his military training to harvest hundreds of thousands of classified documents from military computers and dump them on the Internet, where he knew their release would endanger fellow U.S. soldiers. An attorney for Manning described the 25-year-old soldier as naive but well-intentioned, and said he released the materials because "he was hoping to make the world a better place. " The long-awaited court-martial of the onetime Marylander, who is at the center of the largest security breach in U.S. history, began at Fort Meade on Monday with opening statements from both sides.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 2, 2013
"You people will never be safe. Remove your governments, they don't care about you. " - Michael Adebolajo, one of two men arrested in the murder of British soldier Lee Rigby. Here we go again. Brazen and brutal attacks against British and French soldiers. In broad daylight. At the hands of homegrown Islamic extremists (Mr. Adebolajo is reported to have shouted "Allahu Akbar!" as he struck). European conservatives reflexively clamoring for a crackdown on Islamic fundamentalism.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 26, 2013
I have not seen the video. Not saying I won't, but for now, I've chosen not to. To rush online and seek out cellphone footage of two fanatics with machetes who butchered a British soldier in London on Wednesday, to watch them standing there, hands painted red with his blood, speaking for the cameras, would feel like an act of complicity, like giving them what they want, like being a puppet yanked by its strings. Sometimes, especially in the heat of visceral revulsion, we forget an essential truth about terrorism.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2013
Dressed in the traditional garb of a Civil War Union soldier, Vince Vaise led the two dozen marchers through Mount Auburn, Baltimore's oldest African-American cemetery. Sword drawn, and a stoic look upon his face, Vaise and his followers snaked through the overgrown grass Sunday before stopping at a small white gravestone, which he later explained belonged to Peter Purviance, the city's first freed slave to join the Union army. On this eve of Memorial Day, Vaise and the small group spent the afternoon honoring African-American veterans from the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korea and Vietnam.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Army personnel at Aberdeen Proving Ground are developing methods to detect biological weapons in response to recent threats from North Korea, including a 15-foot-high device that soldiers have dubbed "the Kraken. " North Korea has issued a series of threats in recent weeks, and U.S. officials are monitoring the Korean peninsula, from which Kim Jong-un's government could launch ballistic missiles. While the danger of missiles is more pressing, Army officials said developing better capabilities to detect biological warfare threats has also been a priority for the past six years.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
More than 1,300 young, single soldiers, sailors and other service members drive to Fort Meade every work day because they don't live on post - can't, actually, because the barracks are full and other homes there are for families. The Army installation isn't about to get millions of dollars to build more housing, not with the defense budget falling. Instead, it's getting the Army's first privately developed garden apartments for the unmarried junior-enlisted crowd, with costs covered by the developer.
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