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SPORTS
By Jon Fogg, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Philadelphia's Lincoln Financial Field, Chicago's Soldier Field and Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Mass., are the finalists to host the 2015 to 2018 men's lacrosse championships, the NCAA announced Wednesday. Notably absent was the state of Maryland; Baltimore has hosted the event five times in the past decade. The NCAA said this summer that in response to declining attendance at the event, it would consider holding the event at smaller venues , but Wednesday's announcement indicates that it will continue to hold the championships at NFL stadiums.
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NEWS
October 30, 2013
(Originally published December 26, 1943) For an hour yesterday, over a radio network that extended through Maryland and into Pennsylvania and Virginia, a special Sunpapers' Christmas broadcast brought to their folk and friends back home the voices and music of more than two-score soldiers from the three states who are stationed in the British Isles. The broadcast came from an army camp “somewhere in England” where invasion forces are training, and from a base of the Eighth Air Force elsewhere in the British Isles, through arrangements with the Army Special Services and the British Broadcast Corporation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Ronald S. Coddington, an author and editor, has spent nearly four decades collecting Civil War-era images — especially cartes de visite, his favorite. Out of a collection of 2,500 images he has assembled, 1,500 are cartes de visite, with the remainder being daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes. In 2004, his first collection of images resulted in "Faces of the Civil War: An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories" published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. The format he used, in which he was able to research and write a thumbnail biography of each person, was so successful he did a second volume, "Faces of the Confederacy: An Album of Southern Soldiers and Their Stories," published in 2008.
EXPLORE
September 16, 2013
Sgt. Bruce Alan Reid of Joppa has been chosen by Aberdeen Proving Ground Federal Credit Union as its honoree in this year's "Spotlight a Soldier" program. Each year, the credit union invites members to submit essay nominations of local military service men or women to be honored. The promotion is launched annually in May, which is Military Appreciation Month. Reid was chosen by a panel of APGFCU judges who reviewed this year's submissions and selected him as the honoree. Since Sgt. Reid is serving his second deployment to Afghanistan, his father, Thomas Reid, accepted the $500 award on his son's behalf.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
"Aunt Millie" - as soldiers receiving care packages in Afghanistan affectionately refer to 95-year-old Vivian "Millie" Bailey - doesn't see an end in sight for the work her group does. Yet she and her volunteers are more than willing to take on more. "Whatever number of troops we have over there is too many," says the Running Brook resident, who has lived in Columbia since 1970. "Any time you have to send them toilet paper, and then any president says [the country] is meeting our troops' needs… well, that just makes me want to stand up and fuss and cuss," Bailey said.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries, artifacts and ... quilts. The quilting form will be discussed and displayed Sunday at the Captain Avery Museum in Shady Side, as Mavis Slawson, a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, in Frederick, gives a presentation Sept. 8 on "Civil War Soldiers and Their Quilts. " Slawson said she hoped to convey that quilts provided more than just physical comfort to soldiers in the Civil War - they were also a source of emotional and spiritual solace for men who were a long way from home and in harm's way. "Many of these quilts had special meaning to the soldiers in the field or in the hospitals," said Slawson, a Columbia resident who is not only well-versed in the history of Civil War quilts but is an accomplished quilter herself.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
One day after being sentenced to 35 years in prison for espionage in the largest breach of classified documents in the nation's history, U.S. soldier Bradley Manning made a request of all of us: to stop calling him Brad, and start calling her Chelsea. "As I transition into this next phase of my life, I want everyone to know the real me. I am Chelsea Manning. I am a female," Manning said in a public statement Thursday. "Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
History buffs and connoisseurs of properties older than 100 years should rightly assume a house has a past when its latest addition bears the cornerstone "1835. " "The main part of the house is the addition, and I want you to know we use that word loosely," said Michael Yerman of Prudential Homesale about this unusual offering at 2 Garrison Farms Court in the Pikesville subdivision of Fort Garrison. The original house was built as caretaker and officers' quarters for soldiers assigned to Fort Garrison and dates to 1695.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has appointed Brig. Gen. Linda Singh to head the Maryland Army National Guard. Singh, currently director of the Maryland National Guard's joint staff, will be the first woman and the first African-American to command the Army branch. She succeeds Brig. Gen. Peter Hinz, who is scheduled to retire on Sept. 30. O'Malley called Singh "an extremely effective leader with the drive to take the Maryland Army National Guard to new heights and keep the organization among the best in the nation.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
A soldier assigned to Fort Meade died on Tuesday in Afghanistan in a non-combat incident, the Department of Defense said Wednesday. The Pentagon said Spc. Hilda I. Clayton, 22, of Augusta, Ga., died in Jalalabad, Afghanistan after an undescribed incident in Qaraghahi, Afghanistan. She was assigned at Fort Meade to the 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera), 21st Signal Brigade. The incident that led to Clayton's death is under investigation, the Pentagon said. "Our condolences go out to her loved ones and to the 55th," Col. Edward C. Rothstein wrote on Fort Meade's official Facebook page.
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