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NEWS
By Maria Garriott | November 26, 1996
At First Bull Run, the ninety-dayrecruits left the field, their timewas up, their soldier's duty done.They turned for home, though the smellof powder clung, like mother's hands,around their necks, sad, enduring.They left, refusing to endure.The Union Army fled, the smellof death pursuing. The natal daywas lost; now the plagues of war and timewould ravage town and farm until, doneand spent, the South surrendered bloody hands.Years later, did their hands,whole, unscathed, shame them? Did the daythey refused to serve haunt them, timereplaying, flaunting what they had done?
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NEWS
March 10, 1991
Army Specialist Robert C. Bodnar has been named soldier of the month.He is an armor crew member in Berlin.The soldier is the son of Andrew R. and Angela T. Bodnar of Millersville.His wife, Mary, is the daughter of Charles and Elizabeth Straub of Crofton.He graduated from Old Mill Senior High School in 1985 and Catonsville Community College in 1989.COMPLETE BASIC TRAININGSeveral area servicemen recently completed basic military training:* Army National Guard Pfc. Thomas L. Chapman, son of Susan L. Chapman of Severn, completed his training at Fort Jackson, S.C. Chapman is a 1990 graduate of Meade Senior High School.
NEWS
April 27, 2004
IN DEATH, Pat Tillman is getting the kind of attention he so admirably didn't seek in life. He's being hailed over and over as a remarkable hero. And while we more than agree, the singularity of his death is also a commentary on these times. Specialist Tillman, who forsook the good life of the National Football League for the hazards of soldiering as an Army Ranger, was killed Thursday during a firefight after his combat patrol was ambushed in southeastern Afghanistan. His body was to arrive yesterday at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware, accompanied by his younger brother, who serves in the same elite unit.
NEWS
October 10, 1991
Brooklyn Park soldier has won last night's $6 million Maryland Lotto drawing.Lottery spokesman Carroll H. Hynson Jr. said Sgt. Frances K. Rogers, 38, who serves with a recruitment unit at Fort Meade, purchased the winning ticket. She said she will share her winnings with a close friend, Sharon Taylor, 41, of Severn, a Desert Storm veteran now working in Rogers' unit as a civilian marketing representative.They'll collect 20 annual payments of about $290,000 each, before taxes.The winning numbers drawn last night were 10, 13, 14, 24, 26 and 27.There were 34 tickets sold matching five of the six winning numbers.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | August 25, 2006
A soldier from Gaithersburg was killed in combat in Iraq on Wednesday, the Department of Defense announced yesterday. Army Spc. Thomas J. Barbieri, 24, a gunner assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C., died when he was hit by small-arms fire from enemy forces during combat operations south of Baghdad, the military said. The soldier's parents, Thomas and Carolann Barbieri, were grieving yesterday and not able to talk with the media, a family friend said. Specialist Barbieri, who joined the Army in October 2004, trained at Fort Benning, Ga., and became an infantryman in January 2005.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1998
A lot of things get blowed up real good in "Soldier," a stubbornly simplistic shoot-'em-up that makes one long for the subtle nuances of "The Terminator."Kurt Russell, bulked-up like some earlier-model Schwarzenegger and acting more inert than intense, is Todd, a superman among supermen, the best of a select group of soldiers trained from birth to obey orders and kill.But technology being what it is, there's a new breed of even better, stronger, more single-minded soldiers on the market. In hand-to- hand combat (performed on tiny platforms 30 feet above the ground -- man, this training is tough!
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | February 29, 2008
An organ played as mourners streamed down the aisles of an Annapolis church yesterday toward the flag-draped coffin holding the body of Army Spc. Micheal Benson Matlock Jr. Specialist Matlock, less than three years out of Glen Burnie High School, died last week in Iraq. Yesterday, he was remembered for his devotion to both the high school sweetheart he married barely a year ago and their baby boy - and for the bravery that enabled him to sign on for battle. "It takes courage to do what he did. Nobody joins the Army during wartime," said the Rev. Kaipha Downs, who delivered the eulogy, and who had known the soldier since he was a young boy. "Mike did," she said, to rousing applause from hundreds at the service at the First Christian Community Church.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
On his personal Web site, Army Staff Sgt. Christopher Swanson called himself "Just a regular Joe," and he blogged about growing up in the 1990s, and the valor of soldiers and of his troops. "They are my life and my family right now," he wrote on his myspace.com page, which family and friends used to post word of gatherings and milestones. "I would do anything for them even if it means giving my life to save theirs." On Saturday, Sergeant Swanson, who wrote that his goal was to bring his soldiers home safe, died in an ambush in Anbar, his family said yesterday.
FEATURES
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2003
The highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms for one's country. Hence it is a proud privilege to be a soldier - and a good soldier. - Gen. George S. Patton Jr. In a biting wind and persistent rain that chilled mourners, Gen. George S. Patton Jr. was buried on Christmas Eve 1945, in the Hamm U.S. Military Cemetery in Luxembourg, 12 days after his neck was broken in an automobile accident. Patton, who had led the U.S. 3rd Army from the beaches of Normandy into Czechoslovakia during World War II, remains an almost mythic yet controversial figure 58 years after his death.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN REPORTER | January 12, 2007
Ryan Major was lying in a hospital bed, connected to monitors and a feeding tube, his arms broken and his legs amputated. But the 22-year-old soldier, who was critically injured in Iraq, still wanted to buy his friends Christmas presents. "That's just how he is," says Jen Feeney, one of Major's friends. When Feeney and other friends decided to raise money for some of Major's additional medical expenses, they said they knew how the 2003 Towson High School graduate would want to spend the proceeds -- on someone else.
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