Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSolar System
IN THE NEWS

Solar System

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2011
You probably have more computing power in your pocket than what NASA's venerable Voyager spacecraft are carrying to the edge of the solar system. They have working memories a million times smaller than your home computer. They record their scientific data on 8-track tape machines. And they communicate with their aging human inventors back home with a 23-watt whisper. Even so, the twin explorers, now 33 years into their mission, continue to explore new territory as far as 11 billion miles from Earth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
NASA's Messenger spacecraft has swung around its namesake planet for three years, beaming observations of Mercury back to Earth, but next March it will smash into the cratered surface it has been studying from afar. The satellite's oblong orbit around the solar system's innermost planet brings it gradually closer and closer as it looks into Mercury's mysterious volcanoes, craters and magnetic field. With dwindling fuel to counteract the dense planet's pull, the scientists managing the mission at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel can only delay its fall for so long.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tom Siegfried and Tom Siegfried,Dallas Morning News | September 17, 1992
DALLAS -- Astronomers have discovered an object on the fringe of the solar system, possibly a gigantic comet, farther from the sun than the outermost planets.It is the most distant body detected in the solar system since Pluto's discovery in 1930."If confirmed, it's fair to say that for astronomy this easily could be the discovery of the year, if not the decade," said Alan Stern, an astronomer at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. "In my opinion it is as momentous as the discovery of the first asteroid.
NEWS
July 20, 2014
Thomas Schaller's ironic and disturbing commentary in The Sun, "Not taxing U.S. corporations gives a pass to foreigners" (July 8) yielded two takeaways: (1) In the wake of the Supreme Court decisions in "Citizens United" and "Hobby Lobby," we need a Constitutional amendment that invalidates the preposterous concept of corporate personhood; and (2) Any corporation that sells its goods or services to Americans must pay corporate taxes in the U.S., whether they are chartered in Maryland, an overseas tax shelter, or another solar system.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2004
The sun might have captured thousands or even millions of asteroids from another planetary system during an encounter more than 4 billion years ago, according to a report today in the journal Nature. Such an interstellar ballet would explain many mysteries of the outer solar system, including the strange behavior of the recently discovered Sedna, the system's most distant known object, which occupies a strange elongated orbit far beyond Pluto. If the alien asteroids could be found and studied, these bodies could provide testimony to the conditions under which the sun and the solar system formed, a time otherwise lost.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 1999
A probe that plummeted into Jupiter's atmosphere late in 1995 found more than twice the concentration of volatile elements, such as argon and nitrogen, than was expected, raising questions about standard theories of how the planets formed.The results, which a team of scientists led by Dr. Tobias Owen of the University of Hawaii is reporting in today's issue of Nature, suggest that at least some of the rocky, icy bits of dust and ice that crashed together to form Jupiter -- comet-like bodies called planetesimals -- must have originated under cooler conditions than prevail in the region of the solar system where the planet orbits now.Otherwise the planetesimals would not have been cold enough to trap the volatile gases, which would have been dispersed among the other tenuous matter in interplanetary space.
NEWS
December 9, 1995
IT TOOK 52 minutes for signals traveling at the speed of light from Galileo's probe of the planet Jupiter to reach NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California this week. But processing the signals took longer than expected, and the unexpected 10-minute delay before scientists knew they had the data in hand produced what was surely the most agonizing wait in a long and often frustrating attempt to peer into the huge and mysterious planet at the outer reaches of the solar system.Despite obstacles, Galileo had accomplished the core of its $1.3 billion mission -- dropping the probe into the stormy, gaseous atmosphere of Jupiter and putting itself in orbit around the planet, where it will stay for almost two years.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and By Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | August 5, 2005
The discovery of what might be our solar system's 10th planet could change the way astronomers label the objects they find in the skies. The key question, still unresolved: Just what is a planet? Until the discovery of 2003 UB313 -- they'll choose a catchier name soon -- astronomers had loosely defined what objects they classified as planets, based on factors such as whether they (a) orbit a star, (b) are shaped into spheres by gravity and (c) are at least as big as Pluto, the smallest and most distant planet in our solar system.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 1997
A Canadian astronomer has challenged evidence for the existence of the first planet reported found around another Sun-like star, saying that the phenomenon observed is actually caused by the star's own pulsations, not the gravitational effects of an unseen planetary companion."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The search for life in outer space got a boost yesterday as astronomers announced the discovery of a newborn solar system -- 200 light years away in our own Milky Way galaxy -- that looks a lot like a snapshot of our own solar system in its infancy."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Ikea has expanded the solar energy system at its Perryville distribution center, making it by far the largest rooftop array in the state. The home furnishings retailer said Tuesday it began installing additional solar panels last fall to double the existing system's size. The 1.7 million-square-foot warehouse, built in 2002, employs about 550 workers and distributes inventory to many Ikea stores. The 4.9 megawatt energy system, made up of nearly 26,000 panels, now generates more than 6 million kilowatt hours of electricity a year, the equivalent of eliminating the emissions of 896 cars or powering 591 homes annually.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Scientists from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory are set to launch a massive balloon above the skies of New Mexico this weekend for a glimpse of Comet ISON, the rare comet on its way to looping past the sun and Earth in the coming months. The balloon will be carrying a telescope that will observe ISON, as well as another comet that commonly passes through the solar system, in infrared light to see the water and carbon dioxide emanating from it. The mission was pulled together over the past seven months to gather data on ISON before it passes closely by the sun, potentially destroying the comet.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
When Debra Buczkowski was 7, in 1976, NASA's Viking space probes were landing on Mars and sending images of the red planet back to Earth as part of their $1 billion mission. “I realized that no matter where I went on this planet, I couldn't pick up anything in those photos,” the New York native says, recalling how that mesmerized her. Her early appreciation for the wonders of astronomy led to a career mapping structures on other rocky bodies like Earth, such as Mercury and Mars, as opposed to the gas giants, like Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, she says.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
When Venus passed between Earth and the sun 251 years ago Tuesday, scientists scribbled down observations that helped calculate a rough estimate of the size of our solar system. Using crude telescopes, they watched the yellow planet move across the sun's face as a tiny black disk. There is little more the same rare phenomenon, known as a transit of Venus, will reveal about our closest neighbors in space when it occurs again Tuesday. But astronomers will be watching nonetheless, hoping it will teach them to better discover and investigate planets that are much farther away and could sustain life.
EXPLORE
November 29, 2011
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory dedicated a new building in November on its South Campus. The five-story, 200,000-square-foot glass, brick and steel structure on 35 acres provides an array of modern offices, laboratories and conference areas. Designed with green features such as a reflective roof and energy-saver lighting, Building 200 houses scientists, engineers and support staff from APL's Space Department, who advance the knowledge of the space environment and the planets in the solar system, and address many other challenges faced by NASA and the Department of Defense, the primary sponsors of APL's space research.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
After reading a number of recent articles and letters regarding the solar energy property tax credit, I thought it would be helpful to provide a historical perspective. The current credit of 50 percent of the cost of a qualified system, up to a maximum of $5,000, was enacted by the County Council in 2006. The positive impact on the solar-energy industry was immediate. Solar installations in the county skyrocketed by more than 500 percent the following year, new companies sprang up in and around the county, and hundreds of new jobs were created.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2001
Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope say they have for the first time detected the atmosphere of a planet outside our solar system. What they found wasn't very appealing - sodium, in an atmosphere hot enough to melt pocket change. But scientists were delighted they could learn anything at all about the environment on a planet 150 light-years away. And they're hoping their discovery will be the first in a series that will compare the atmospheres of a host of "extra-solar" planets, perhaps eventually leading them to one that is hospitable to life.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1991
Baltimore County police today were seeking seven adults and three juveniles charged in warrants as members of a ring that sold and distributed cocaine and heroin out of the Northbrook community near Perring Parkway and Hillsway Avenue.Police said other members of the ring, 11 adults and four juveniles, were arrested beginning last evening as police squads moved through the townhouse community near the northern city line.The arrests culminated a five-month undercover investigation, police said.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2011
Baltimore's Constellation Energy Group, which agreed last month to sell itself to Exelon Corp., announced Wednesday that it will build the largest solar roof installation in the United States at a Toys "R" Us distribution center in New Jersey. The 5.38-megawatt solar rooftop project will be the largest at a single building, according to the Solar Energy Industry Association. Constellation will build and own the solar system, while the toy retailer will purchase all of the electricity generated by the solar panels under a 20-year power purchase deal.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2011
You probably have more computing power in your pocket than what NASA's venerable Voyager spacecraft are carrying to the edge of the solar system. They have working memories a million times smaller than your home computer. They record their scientific data on 8-track tape machines. And they communicate with their aging human inventors back home with a 23-watt whisper. Even so, the twin explorers, now 33 years into their mission, continue to explore new territory as far as 11 billion miles from Earth.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.