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By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
GREENBELT -- Scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center unveiled new satellites yesterday that may represent the future of space science - and they're about the size of your microwave oven. The agency's Space Technology 5 mission will test three micro-satellites designed to measure Earth's magnetic field, track the solar storms that batter it and serve as prototypes for probes that can predict solar hurricanes the way forecasters predict the weather on Earth. It's an increasingly important job in a world that relies on global positioning technology for navigation and communication - systems that can be dangerously disrupted by solar storms.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
GPS technology is integrated into the operation of nearly every piece of farming equipment Finch Services Inc. sells in Maryland and Pennsylvania, helping farmers ensure they don't cover the same ground twice when scattering seeds or spraying fields. Without a satellite signal, the machinery would be rendered useless, said Trevor Prior, a Finch salesman in Westminster. Users of the location-finding system — found in tractors and cars and military missiles — could soon find themselves lost, depending on the weather in space.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - Our stormy sun continues to bubble, bubble - and cause trouble here on Earth. Yesterday, the sixth strong solar flare in less than 48 hours shot toward Earth, where the rapid-fire attack from the sun may cause momentary disruptions in Northeastern U.S. power grids and bedevil satellite, radio, and navigation transmissions, space weather forecasters said. The effects won't be life-threatening; neither are they likely to cause major safety problems with things such as airplanes, experts said.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 12, 2009
Verbraunia Rhodes of Baltimore is working on her "bucket list" and plans an Alaskan cruise to see the Northern Lights "before I pass on." She asks what time of year is best for aurora viewing. Good choice. Alaska is the best place in the U.S. to see the Northern Lights. Plan to go in September or March. Skies are dark, it's not too frigid and Earth's orbit is most likely to carry us through solar storms.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 12, 2009
Verbraunia Rhodes of Baltimore is working on her "bucket list" and plans an Alaskan cruise to see the Northern Lights "before I pass on." She asks what time of year is best for aurora viewing. Good choice. Alaska is the best place in the U.S. to see the Northern Lights. Plan to go in September or March. Skies are dark, it's not too frigid and Earth's orbit is most likely to carry us through solar storms.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab will build and operate two pairs of NASA spacecraft to study the sometimes damaging and dangerous effects of solar storms. APL officials said yesterday that the two missions would bring about $200 million to the laboratory near Laurel over the next decade. They will add as many as 100 jobs at APL and support 1,000 more among contractors and suppliers in the region. Another $200 million will be spent elsewhere to provide launch vehicles and scientific instruments for the four spacecraft.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
The heat and drought searing this region might have been spawned by violent storms sweeping the sun, says Pennsylvania's climatologist.In weather records for Northeast cities, Paul Knight of Pennsylvania State University found that the hottest, driest periods tend to occur during the most intense periods of sunspot activity.Sunspots are storms of atomic particles and electromagnetic energy that erupt over the sun's surface. They vary over time, reaching a peak every 11 years during what is called the "solar maximum."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | April 24, 2007
GREENBELT -- Scientists with NASA's "Stereo" mission have gotten their first look at the sun in three dimensions - a revelation that could mean more accurate forecasts of the solar storms that rattle power grids and blind the satellites vital to modern communications, navigation and weather forecasting. The revolutionary new view of the sun comes from two Maryland-built spacecraft launched last October and controlled from the campus of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab near Laurel.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Reporter | August 25, 2006
In 2003, three days before Halloween, one of the most powerful solar flares ever recorded exploded from the sun, hurling billions of tons of electrified particles toward Earth. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration quickly sounded the alarm. Forecasters warned that a geomagnetic storm with the power to cripple satellites and take down power grids would collide with the planet in 24 hours. The solar squall showed up - but five hours earlier and with far less punch than predicted.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | January 26, 2007
Two Maryland-built satellites, launched in October aboard the same rocket, have pulled off separate pirouettes around the moon and headed off in opposite directions to begin a series of stereoscopic observations of the sun. "Everything has been picture-perfect up to this point," said Ron Denissen, mission project manager at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory for NASA's $520 million STEREO mission. All the instrument doors, solar panels and the high-gain antennas on both craft opened or deployed as planned.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | April 24, 2007
GREENBELT -- Scientists with NASA's "Stereo" mission have gotten their first look at the sun in three dimensions - a revelation that could mean more accurate forecasts of the solar storms that rattle power grids and blind the satellites vital to modern communications, navigation and weather forecasting. The revolutionary new view of the sun comes from two Maryland-built spacecraft launched last October and controlled from the campus of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab near Laurel.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | January 26, 2007
Two Maryland-built satellites, launched in October aboard the same rocket, have pulled off separate pirouettes around the moon and headed off in opposite directions to begin a series of stereoscopic observations of the sun. "Everything has been picture-perfect up to this point," said Ron Denissen, mission project manager at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory for NASA's $520 million STEREO mission. All the instrument doors, solar panels and the high-gain antennas on both craft opened or deployed as planned.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Reporter | August 25, 2006
In 2003, three days before Halloween, one of the most powerful solar flares ever recorded exploded from the sun, hurling billions of tons of electrified particles toward Earth. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration quickly sounded the alarm. Forecasters warned that a geomagnetic storm with the power to cripple satellites and take down power grids would collide with the planet in 24 hours. The solar squall showed up - but five hours earlier and with far less punch than predicted.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
GREENBELT -- Scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center unveiled new satellites yesterday that may represent the future of space science - and they're about the size of your microwave oven. The agency's Space Technology 5 mission will test three micro-satellites designed to measure Earth's magnetic field, track the solar storms that batter it and serve as prototypes for probes that can predict solar hurricanes the way forecasters predict the weather on Earth. It's an increasingly important job in a world that relies on global positioning technology for navigation and communication - systems that can be dangerously disrupted by solar storms.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
On Jan. 11, a speck appeared on the left side of the sun. Tiny at first, in less than 48 hours it blossomed into a vast, dark sunspot complex 10 times the size of the Earth. It was one of the largest sunspot formations of the current 11-year cycle of solar activity. So astronomers declared a solar "flare watch" campaign, dropped whatever they were doing and turned their instruments toward it. "We knew something would come," said Bernhard Fleck, a European Space Agency scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab will build and operate two pairs of NASA spacecraft to study the sometimes damaging and dangerous effects of solar storms. APL officials said yesterday that the two missions would bring about $200 million to the laboratory near Laurel over the next decade. They will add as many as 100 jobs at APL and support 1,000 more among contractors and suppliers in the region. Another $200 million will be spent elsewhere to provide launch vehicles and scientific instruments for the four spacecraft.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
GPS technology is integrated into the operation of nearly every piece of farming equipment Finch Services Inc. sells in Maryland and Pennsylvania, helping farmers ensure they don't cover the same ground twice when scattering seeds or spraying fields. Without a satellite signal, the machinery would be rendered useless, said Trevor Prior, a Finch salesman in Westminster. Users of the location-finding system — found in tractors and cars and military missiles — could soon find themselves lost, depending on the weather in space.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
A powerful eruption on the sun's surface yesterday has sent a storm of solar particles and magnetic energy hurtling toward Earth at more than a million miles per hour. Scientists aren't sure yet what to expect when it arrives late tomorrow or early Friday. But electric utilities and satellite operators have been advised to prepare for possible disruptions from what is being described as the first big event of the current 11-year solar cycle. "It's rare. It's unusual. And we do anticipate a strong geomagnetic storm on June 8 and 9," said Ernie Hildner, director of the federal government's Space Environmental Center in Boulder, Colo.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - Our stormy sun continues to bubble, bubble - and cause trouble here on Earth. Yesterday, the sixth strong solar flare in less than 48 hours shot toward Earth, where the rapid-fire attack from the sun may cause momentary disruptions in Northeastern U.S. power grids and bedevil satellite, radio, and navigation transmissions, space weather forecasters said. The effects won't be life-threatening; neither are they likely to cause major safety problems with things such as airplanes, experts said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
A powerful eruption on the sun's surface yesterday has sent a storm of solar particles and magnetic energy hurtling toward Earth at more than a million miles per hour. Scientists aren't sure yet what to expect when it arrives late tomorrow or early Friday. But electric utilities and satellite operators have been advised to prepare for possible disruptions from what is being described as the first big event of the current 11-year solar cycle. "It's rare. It's unusual. And we do anticipate a strong geomagnetic storm on June 8 and 9," said Ernie Hildner, director of the federal government's Space Environmental Center in Boulder, Colo.
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