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NEWS
July 25, 2008
Picture this: a 6-mile-wide solar-power satellite orbiting 22,000 miles in space. Photo-sensitive panels on the satellite collect light from the sun and turn it into microwave radiation that an antenna beams down to a ground station, where it's converted into enough electricity to power a large city. Sound like science fiction? Last year, a government study group issued a report that said space-based solar power not only was technically feasible but also offered a potentially clean, renewable source of energy that could significantly reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
Commentator Dan Ervin's recent discussion of the region's need for nuclear power argues that green alternatives such as wind and solar power can't adequately meet our energy needs ( "The nuclear option Aug. 26). He goes on to describe how green nuclear power is and how it won't contribute to global warming by contributing to carbon dioxide emissions. OK, I'll buy that. But isn't one of the most established facts about global warming the rise in sea levels we've already experience right here in the Chesapeake Bay?
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BUSINESS
February 17, 2010
Constellation Energy Group Inc., the parent company of Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., said Tuesday it would invest $90 million to support the development of solar power systems for commercial customers. The money is being set aside to develop solar-energy installations of 500 kilowatts or larger, using photovoltaic power systems, for customers that begin construction before mid-2010. About $18 million has been committed to projects in development in Maryland and New Jersey, the company said.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on the impact of climate change on the economy, I agree that resolving the issue of climate change would not be an economic failure but rather a success ( "The economic climate ," June 24). Aside from the fact that if climate change is ignored the situation of the economy will become an issue of infinitely less importance than the condition of our planet, exploring solutions to the problem will open many opportunities to improve the economy. At current rates of consumption, there is an estimated 50 years of oil left in Earth's crust.
NEWS
September 6, 2011
After Hurricane Irene, power to my entire block in Hampden was out - except at my house, thanks to my solar panels. While the panels obviously didn't work during the night of the storm, by the next morning my fridge was still ice cold, my sump pump was back on and I was able to tend my yard without the din of a generator. By the time nightfall came and my panels were starting to switch off, I had been able to accomplish all my electric chores. I spent the rest of the day chatting with neighbors and enjoying a peaceful evening.
NEWS
January 17, 2013
I'm concerned about Gov. Martin O'Malley's continuing push for wind energy off of Maryland's coast ("O'Malley to push for wind yet again," Jan. 13). I'm not opposed to wind energy as such, but I am in favor of spending taxpayer's dollars efficiently. Offshore wind turbines represent a tremendous engineering and long-term maintenance project. Has anyone in state government considered solar power instead of wind? Solar is so much simpler; it has no moving parts and thus little requirement for maintenance.
NEWS
March 17, 2012
Columnist Robert Ehrlich's commentary on energy policy suggests that more oil exploration and drilling will lead to energy independence ("Road to energy independence goes through ANWR and Keystone," March 11). This is largely a myth perpetuated by fossil fuel companies and their political allies in order to enhance their bottom lines. In today's global economy, anything and everything is subject to being sold to the highest bidder. Canadian tar-sands oil, American off-shore oil, natural gas and even coal are no exceptions.
NEWS
October 17, 2011
Rather than the Washington political circus that undoubtedly will mark Congress' upcoming hearings into the collapse of Solyndra, the government-subsidized solar panel maker, the company's problems should be viewed as an unfortunate bump in the road toward realizing the global economic engine the solar energy industry can become. The numbers speak for themselves. The solar energy industry provides over 100,000 jobs in the United States, working at more than 5,000 companies in all 50 states.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 16, 2012
Solar power is gaining a toehold in the Mid-Atlantic region.  As of this month, the amount of photovoltaic electric generating capacity installed surpassed 1 gigawatt, according to PJM Interconnection , which oversees the electricity transmission grid stretching from Delaware to northern Illinois and western Kentucky. That's enough - when the sun is shining - to power 800,000 to 1 million homes. Solar capacity has more than doubled in each of the past two years, PJM reports.
EXPLORE
By Aegis staff report | May 31, 2011
Paul Magness of the department of parks and recreation and Bill McKean of the department of public works' capital projects division have earned green stars for this quarter for their integration of alternative energy into the roof replacement design at the barn at the Harford County Equestrian Center. The county government announced the recognition for the two veteran employees last week. In total, five solar powered roof ventilation fans were installed as part of the equestrian barn roof replacement.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Countless famous footsteps have crossed the White House's entrance hall, but on Tuesday, some of the country's top science and technology dignitaries had to dodge a hovercraft made of foam and a paper bowl whizzing across the shiny pink-and-white marble. It was built by a group of five students at Patterson High School, selected among 30 research ventures for the fourth annual White House science fair. They won a place at the event by merit of a competition they won last fall, putting them in a room with President Barack Obama and with leaders of NASA, the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, who visited with the students and asked questions.
NEWS
By Cheryl Casciani | March 14, 2014
So, how about this weather? This question is often just small talk, but conversation about the recent weather has not been simple idle chatter. While Baltimore was bundled up against the frigid "polar vortex," Alaska saw record high temperatures. While Atlanta was virtually shut down in an unusual winter storm, California experienced a severe drought. Scientists predict climate change will mean more extreme weather - longer droughts, bigger storms and more extreme hot and cold temperatures.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
New solar panels unveiled last week at a real estate developer's Laurel headquarters come with an unusual twist — an energy storage system, the first such commercial setup in the state and one of the first in the country. That drew a crowd. But regular solar-energy projects? Not so much. "You don't see many solar dedications now, and it's for a good reason: It's because solar is becoming more mainstream," said Thomas Leyden, CEO of Philadelphia-based Solar Grid Storage, which worked on the Laurel project.
NEWS
By Steve Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
Three years ago, Frank Smith of Glen Burnie spent more than $44,000 to make the transition to solar power at his Cape Cod-style home, which was built in 1957. That seemed like a hefty expense at the time, but significantly lower energy costs and tax credits from the state have helped offset that expenditure. Now, he says, "I pay no electric bill whatsoever. "I will recoup my entire investment in just seven to 10 years. Now, I'm also looking to put solar panels on the garage behind the house," he said.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | September 30, 2013
Chip Gribben has been a green kind of guy for a long time. He composts his scraps in his back yard, uses energy-efficient light bulbs and has been driving an electric car for 20 years. But only last year did he and his wife take one of the biggest steps environmentally minded consumers can take: They installed solar panels on their roof to power their West Laurel house. This year, Chip and Monica Gribben's house on Holger Court is one of more than 50 solar and green homes - including six in the Laurel area - featured on the annual Washington Metropolitan Area Tour of Solar Homes.
NEWS
January 17, 2013
I'm concerned about Gov. Martin O'Malley's continuing push for wind energy off of Maryland's coast ("O'Malley to push for wind yet again," Jan. 13). I'm not opposed to wind energy as such, but I am in favor of spending taxpayer's dollars efficiently. Offshore wind turbines represent a tremendous engineering and long-term maintenance project. Has anyone in state government considered solar power instead of wind? Solar is so much simpler; it has no moving parts and thus little requirement for maintenance.
NEWS
By Steve Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
Three years ago, Frank Smith of Glen Burnie spent more than $44,000 to make the transition to solar power at his Cape Cod-style home, which was built in 1957. That seemed like a hefty expense at the time, but significantly lower energy costs and tax credits from the state have helped offset that expenditure. Now, he says, "I pay no electric bill whatsoever. "I will recoup my entire investment in just seven to 10 years. Now, I'm also looking to put solar panels on the garage behind the house," he said.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | September 30, 2013
Chip Gribben has been a green kind of guy for a long time. He composts his scraps in his back yard, uses energy-efficient light bulbs and has been driving an electric car for 20 years. But only last year did he and his wife take one of the biggest steps environmentally minded consumers can take: They installed solar panels on their roof to power their West Laurel house. This year, Chip and Monica Gribben's house on Holger Court is one of more than 50 solar and green homes - including six in the Laurel area - featured on the annual Washington Metropolitan Area Tour of Solar Homes.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
Say no to fracking if you don't want flammable drinking water ("Say yes to LNG," Nov. 13). We shouldn't ruin our drinking water just to deliver liquid natural gas to China. Would they run their tankers on natural gas? The oil is running out, so the cost of transporting anything is rising dramatically. China is a long way away and won't be able to afford it if we don't buy their plastic junk. Germany recently acknowledged that 99 percent of its oil reserves were imaginary, and as a result it has rapidly became a world leader in solar power.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
Nixon's Farm in West Friendship has for 50 years been a fine place for country weddings in the converted 19th-century barn amid the grassy hills - "centrally isolated," the website calls the spot. Soon, though, a portion of the grounds off Route 32 could become the county's largest solar electricity generator, and the first built strictly to sell power to a utility. A Baltimore-based energy engineering and consulting company has Howard County's permission to build an array of 10,400 solar panels designed to generate up to 2 megawatts, enough power for hundreds of houses.
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