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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Worthington Elementary School in Ellicott City will soon receive nearly 90 percent of its electrical power from the sun. Howard County Board of Education officials say they've partnered with the county's Department of Public Works to place about 2,000 solar panels on a landfill next to Worthington Elementary that will supply the school with solar energy year-round. The project, which will be discussed at Worthington's Media Center on Tuesday night, is a boost to a school that already employs environmentally conscious practices such as Waste-Free Wednesdays, when students are encouraged to pack meals in reusable containers and use cloth napkins.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The historic Rodgers Forge neighborhood in Towson has adopted guidelines for residents who want to install solar panels, an effort community leaders hope can strike a balance between preserving the community's architecture and embracing alternative energy. A committee of the Rodgers Forge Community Association worked for about a year to come up with the recommendations, which the full board approved in September, according to immediate past president Stu Sirota. "I think this shows that Rodgers Forge is a progressive neighborhood that cares about its history and maintaining the architectural integrity of its homes, while still being able to allow a modern and innovative green technology," Sirota said.
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FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | January 23, 2010
Michael Zipp has been building things his whole life, so when his wife, Karen, decided they should do their part for the environment and install solar panels on their Halethorpe home, he immediately thought about climbing on the roof himself. But after some research, he decided he shouldn't. And as major retailers begin to push a do-it-yourself movement in solar energy, some experts say green-minded homeowners generally shouldn't get on a ladder either - even if it means paying more for installation.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A project to install emergency generators at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant at 8900 Greenwood Place in Savage is scheduled to begin Monday. Three 2,500-kilowatt emergency power generators and 15-kilovolt switchgear will be installed to provide a third power source for the plant, in the event the two independent Baltimore Gas and Electric power feeds are disrupted, according to a news release from the county. The generators are part of the county's $8.1 million electrical protection system upgrade in an effort to safeguard the Water Reclamation Plant from outages that could lead to sewage overflows, such as that which occurred during Superstorm Sandy.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2012
A proposal to build solar panels on a historic property in Mount Washington has drawn criticism from neighbors who believe it will be an eyesore for some nearby houses. The Chimes, a Baltimore-based nonprofit, plans to put solar panels in a grassy area between two Victorian houses it owns in the Dixon Hill neighborhood of Mount Washington. The panels would produce electricity for the residences on the property. "The plan is to put a small ground-mounted system between two of the buildings," said Martin S. Lampner, the president and CEO of The Chimes.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
At one of Annapolis' public housing buildings last week, new solar panels on the roof collected energy to heat hot water for more than two dozen apartments below. Inside, a message scrawled on the wall asked whoever had been urinating in the hallway to knock it off. It seems an odd juxtaposition - high technology above, reeking hallways below - but the two are directly related. The outdated buildings of the cash-strapped housing authority made them prime targets for a company that has come up with an innovative business plan to capture renewable energy credits by spreading green technology - in this case, installing solar panels on the roofs of two public housing complexes at no charge.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
Maryland is so eager for its residents to try solar power that it offers homeowners thousands of dollars in grants to mount photovoltaic panels on or around their homes to generate electricity from the sun. Just don't try to put them on your boat pier. That's what Robert Bruninga found out when he proposed putting PV panels on a wooden pier jutting out into Marley Creek in Glen Burnie. An engineer at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Bruninga says he needs to use his pier because there are too many trees elsewhere on his property to get a steady dose of the sun's energy-producing rays.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Solar power will never replace jet power at BWI Marshall Airport, but officials believe the clean energy generated by newly installed roof panels atop the daily parking garage could boost the airport's image and bottom line. The solar panels are part of a $19.4 million package of upgrades to conserve energy, shrink the airport's carbon footprint and reduce water consumption, said Paul Wiedefeld, executive director of Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. "Two things drove this project: the environmental impact and the savings," Wiedefeld said Thursday.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
As a longtime educator and Rodgers Forge resident, I was excited to read in Nov. 11 article by Jon Meoli that Dumbarton Middle School in Towson will get a renovation. Yet I was shocked that solar panel roofs weren't an integral part of the initial plan of the firm, Smolen Emr Ilkovitch Architects. Maryland and Baltimore County will spend $27.5 million in taxpayer money on this renovation. By installing solar panel rooftops, we will have a rare chance to do many good things at once: making renewable electricity a priority in a celebrated public school, ensure cost savings in ongoing school operating costs, and offer hopeful 21st century experiential learning opportunities for students.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
Solar panels under construction at a long-capped landfill in Howard County will soon be used to offset energy costs at a nearby elementary school. The county began installation of the solar arrays this week at the former New Cut Landfill, an 83-acre tract in Ellicott City that shut down operations more than 30 years ago. Officials expect the $462,000 project will be completed in about eight weeks and the panels will begin drawing energy from the...
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
More than 50 Maryland middle-schools students have been building a house during a summer camp in Annapolis - not a routine task for teens and preteens. "I came here skeptical," acknowledged JJ Jennings, 13, a rising eighth-grader at the Key School in Annapolis. "Why am I paying to do labor?" To be fair, the house is a small-scale project - 210 square feet and sitting on trailer in the Key School parking lot. But that doesn't mean it's a not a big deal. Complete with solar panels and a rainwater filtration system, the compact home is designed to have the smallest possible carbon footprint.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Ikea has expanded the solar energy system at its Perryville distribution center, making it by far the largest rooftop array in the state. The home furnishings retailer said Tuesday it began installing additional solar panels last fall to double the existing system's size. The 1.7 million-square-foot warehouse, built in 2002, employs about 550 workers and distributes inventory to many Ikea stores. The 4.9 megawatt energy system, made up of nearly 26,000 panels, now generates more than 6 million kilowatt hours of electricity a year, the equivalent of eliminating the emissions of 896 cars or powering 591 homes annually.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Think sunshine - not just sweetness - when you see the Domino Sugars sign lighting up the Inner Harbor at night. Solar panels have been installed on a rooftop at the sugar refinery off Key Highway to illuminate the neon fixture that's long been a landmark of the Baltimore skyline. The photovoltaic array is part of a push by Domino and its corporate parent, Florida-based ASR Group, to make the world's leading producer of cane sugar a little greener. With the $125,000 solar installation and other moves, "we hope to show Baltimore every day that sustainability is top-of-mind here and at our facilities across the globe," said Peter O'Malley, ASR Group's vice president of corporate relations.
NEWS
March 15, 2014
The General Assembly should not approve any bills that allow wind turbines or solar panels on agricultural lands that are under restrictive easements purchased from farmers by the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation, MALPF ( "Bills would allow wind, solar projects on protected farmland," March 6). The easements preserve the use of the land for agriculture and forestry, and commercial development is prohibited. Any commercial use must be related to the production of agricultural or forestry products.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Maryland citizens who enjoy preserved farmland and open space should oppose legislation in the General Assembly that would take land out of agricultural preservation and allow commercial solar or wind power infrastructure to be built there. When the Maryland legislature created the state's farmland preservation program in 1977 it had a mission that should remain unchanged: To preserve good land for farmers and preserve open space for all Marylanders to enjoy. The proposed legislation embraces alternative energy, and there's nothing wrong with that.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
At Tom and Marcia Lewis' house in Annapolis, the future meets the past. Last year the couple installed solar panels on the roof of their 110-year-old frame house in the city's Historic District. "We're very much in favor of alternative energy sources," Marcia Lewis says. Residential solar energy sales are booming in the United States, and property owners are increasingly finding ways to combine historic preservation with energy preservation. The Lewises had their panels installed on the back roof of their three-story home on Conduit Street.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
Updated plans to put solar panels in the Maryland Science Center 's parking lot were presented to the Federal Hill neighborhood group Tuesday evening by the museum and Constellation Energy. About 30 nearby residents showed up to hear about the project, which is designed to supply some electricity to the Inner Harbor center while educating visitors about a form of renewable energy. The plans had been modified because of prior objections from neighbors. "Our mission is to explain science and technology and to basically excite the next generation of innovators," said Van R. Reiner, president and chief executive of the science center.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Meredith Cohn and Laura Smitherman and Meredith Cohn,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | August 6, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley and his wife, Katie, have put a "green" stamp on the governor's mansion since moving in three years ago. Next week, they will take environmentalism to a new level by installing solar panels on the roof. The panels, and other upgrades such as more efficient lighting and temperature controls, are part of a broader project to save energy at state-operated buildings. The solar array will provide about half of the hot water used by the mansion's residents, and will be installed inconspicuously to preserve the character of the 140-year-old historic mansion that is one of the most visible landmarks in Annapolis.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The first U.S.-launched satellite, Explorer I, was 6 feet long and weighed 30 pounds, and it led to the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belt that surrounds Earth. More than 50 years later, scientists could do a lot more with far less. Scientists in Maryland are helping to design satellites that could fit in a shoebox yet provide the same - or better - capabilities as NASA spacecraft that are far larger and more costly. The devices, composed of one or more 10-centimeter cubes, have been used over the past decade for affordable yet relatively low-tech experiments for university students, but a pair recently launched could advance the technology.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
As a longtime educator and Rodgers Forge resident, I was excited to read in Nov. 11 article by Jon Meoli that Dumbarton Middle School in Towson will get a renovation. Yet I was shocked that solar panel roofs weren't an integral part of the initial plan of the firm, Smolen Emr Ilkovitch Architects. Maryland and Baltimore County will spend $27.5 million in taxpayer money on this renovation. By installing solar panel rooftops, we will have a rare chance to do many good things at once: making renewable electricity a priority in a celebrated public school, ensure cost savings in ongoing school operating costs, and offer hopeful 21st century experiential learning opportunities for students.
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