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Solar Flares

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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | June 7, 1991
Tonight's forecast calls for fair skies and continued cool, with a chance of geo-magnetic storms.Government scientists say the eruptions of three huge flares on the surface of the sun since last Saturday have sent blasts of high-energy particles toward Earth.These solar wind "gusts" have caused auroras, or Northern Lights displays as far south as Philadelphia, and threaten to briefly disrupt electrical service, navigation gear and shortwave radio signals.Energy from the most recent flare, on Wednesday night, should reach Earth by tonight, scientists say.So far, little more than auroras have been reported.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
A solar flare that was the largest of the year could create a rare chance to see the aurora borealis, or "Northern Lights", from Maryland on Saturday night. The flare occurred Thursday at 3:16 a.m. and was associated with what is known as a coronal mass ejection, in which charged particles released by the sun hurtle through space and sometimes pass by the Earth. The particles can create dramatic episodes of the Northen Lights, though they can also affect satellite communications and GPS. According to AccuWeather.com, viewing conditions for the Northern Lights will be best in the mid-Atlantic, with clouds blocking the view for much of the northern U.S. and Canada.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
On Dec. 20, Johns Hopkins University astro-geophysicist David M. Rust plans to step out onto the Antarctic ice and launch the longest, most detailed observation of the sun ever attempted.Dr. Rust and five colleagues from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel are preparing to loft a converted "star wars" telescope 23 miles into the air beneath a giant helium balloon.Called the Flare Genesis Solar Observatory, the $16 million project is designed to unlock the mysteries of solar flares and gigantic magnetic storms that sometimes erupt from the sun's surface into interplanetary space.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
GPS technology is integrated into the operation of nearly every piece of farming equipment Finch Services Inc. sells in Maryland and Pennsylvania, helping farmers ensure they don't cover the same ground twice when scattering seeds or spraying fields. Without a satellite signal, the machinery would be rendered useless, said Trevor Prior, a Finch salesman in Westminster. Users of the location-finding system — found in tractors and cars and military missiles — could soon find themselves lost, depending on the weather in space.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
MCMURDO STATION, Antarctica -- After years of setbacks and weeks of delays, scientists from Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory launched a mammoth balloon here yesterday carrying their star-crossed solar telescope. Displaying the endurance that this continent requires of explorers, the Hopkins team and its leader, physicist David M. Rust, overcame technical problems and began capturing the first images on tapes aboard the balloon's gondola. Although the pictures won't be retrieved for several weeks, the launch of the Flare Genesis Telescope brought Rust one step closer to fulfilling his dream of creating the sharpest images ever of the sun. In late afternoon, with the temperature hovering around 14 degrees, Rust watched the telescope -- about the size of a minivan -- soar into the thin Antarctic air. "Wow," said Rust, 60, of Silver Spring, staring up through his ski goggles.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | June 8, 1991
The sun, in a periodic show of its force, is shooting off powerful solar flares that disrupt the Earth's magnetic force and could cause power shortages in the Northern United States over the next week and spark a display of the northern lights visible as far south as Maryland.This is a sun storm, and government scientists monitoring it in Boulder, Colo., have classified it as "severe," the category designating the highest degree of force.The last severe solar storm, in March 1989, caused power blackouts in northern New York and Canada.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer GR. COLOR PHOTO | September 15, 1992
A team of Johns Hopkins University scientists is designing what may become the largest, most powerful solar telescope ever flown above the Earth's blurring atmosphere.But this state-of-the-art instrument, designed to help researchers find the cause of violent eruptions on the sun's surface, won't soar into orbit aboard a ground-shaking launcher. A NASA rocket or space shuttle flight might take a decade of planning and cost hundreds of millions of dollars, scientists say.Instead, the telescope and its telephone-booth shaped gondola will fly economy class -- dragged 19 miles above Antarctica by a balloon.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1996
The Antarctic wind near the bleak Adelie Coast last week was blowing at 46 mph. The temperature was hovering at 13 degrees below zero -- forbidding weather for most fliers.But to pilot Henry Perk, this was the kind of "break" he needed to get airborne in a place where the weather is often brutal. Mr. Perk had been hired to fly his twin-engine De Havilland Twin Otter to a remote spot 140 miles inland from the French coastal station at Dumont d'Urville, where a Johns Hopkins University solar telescope had parachuted to Earth after flying for more than 19 days beneath a helium balloon 25 miles above the ice.The telescope had survived despite a lost antenna, a wrong turn over the Ross Sea and a storm that struck after it landed.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Reporter | August 25, 2006
In 2003, three days before Halloween, one of the most powerful solar flares ever recorded exploded from the sun, hurling billions of tons of electrified particles toward Earth. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration quickly sounded the alarm. Forecasters warned that a geomagnetic storm with the power to cripple satellites and take down power grids would collide with the planet in 24 hours. The solar squall showed up - but five hours earlier and with far less punch than predicted.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
GPS technology is integrated into the operation of nearly every piece of farming equipment Finch Services Inc. sells in Maryland and Pennsylvania, helping farmers ensure they don't cover the same ground twice when scattering seeds or spraying fields. Without a satellite signal, the machinery would be rendered useless, said Trevor Prior, a Finch salesman in Westminster. Users of the location-finding system — found in tractors and cars and military missiles — could soon find themselves lost, depending on the weather in space.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 8, 2012
NASA is warning of a large solar flare expected to impact Earth on Wednesday night or Thursday morning, potentially disturbing radio communication, GPS and power grids. A phenomenon known as a coronal mass ejection associated with a solar flare detected Tuesday is expected to reach us between 5:25 p.m. Wednesday and 8:25 a.m. Thursday, traveling at 1,300 miles per second. The events involve massive quantities of matter and electromagnetic radiation being released from the sun and traveling through space.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | June 9, 2011
How many in your party? Has anyone spoken to you yet? Have you spoken to anyone yet? Does the hostess know you're here? Someone will be right with you. Someone should be right with you. No one will ever be with you. Sorry you've been kept waiting. Sorry you had to wait.  I hope you haven't been waiting long. I was seating another party. I don't work here. How many? Is this everybody? Is this the whole party? Three? Four? We ask that everyone in the party be here before we seat you. Are you together?
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Reporter | August 25, 2006
In 2003, three days before Halloween, one of the most powerful solar flares ever recorded exploded from the sun, hurling billions of tons of electrified particles toward Earth. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration quickly sounded the alarm. Forecasters warned that a geomagnetic storm with the power to cripple satellites and take down power grids would collide with the planet in 24 hours. The solar squall showed up - but five hours earlier and with far less punch than predicted.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2005
Space weather forecasters are watching the development of a large spot on the sun - a region on the solar surface with a potential to hurl dangerous solar particles toward the crews of the shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station. They say the sunspot has been active in recent days, and new eruptions are possible. Some would pose no risk. But a blast of high-energy protons could force the two crews to seek shelter in one of the space station's protected Russian modules, solar scientists say. That has happened to shuttle and station crews several times in the past, most recently in 2003.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2000
The eruption of a powerful flare on the surface of the sun yesterday has triggered what scientists are calling the biggest solar radiation event since the fall of 1989. The flare was followed by a coronal mass ejection - a blast of billions of tons of electrically charged atomic particles and magnetic energy - hurled in the Earth's direction at 3 million miles an hour. The blast was expected to trigger "strong" to "severe" geomagnetic disturbances this weekend, affecting power grids, pipelines, navigation systems, shortwave radio communications and satellite operations.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
MCMURDO STATION, Antarctica -- After years of setbacks and weeks of delays, scientists from Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory launched a mammoth balloon here yesterday carrying their star-crossed solar telescope. Displaying the endurance that this continent requires of explorers, the Hopkins team and its leader, physicist David M. Rust, overcame technical problems and began capturing the first images on tapes aboard the balloon's gondola. Although the pictures won't be retrieved for several weeks, the launch of the Flare Genesis Telescope brought Rust one step closer to fulfilling his dream of creating the sharpest images ever of the sun. In late afternoon, with the temperature hovering around 14 degrees, Rust watched the telescope -- about the size of a minivan -- soar into the thin Antarctic air. "Wow," said Rust, 60, of Silver Spring, staring up through his ski goggles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | June 9, 2011
How many in your party? Has anyone spoken to you yet? Have you spoken to anyone yet? Does the hostess know you're here? Someone will be right with you. Someone should be right with you. No one will ever be with you. Sorry you've been kept waiting. Sorry you had to wait.  I hope you haven't been waiting long. I was seating another party. I don't work here. How many? Is this everybody? Is this the whole party? Three? Four? We ask that everyone in the party be here before we seat you. Are you together?
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 8, 2012
NASA is warning of a large solar flare expected to impact Earth on Wednesday night or Thursday morning, potentially disturbing radio communication, GPS and power grids. A phenomenon known as a coronal mass ejection associated with a solar flare detected Tuesday is expected to reach us between 5:25 p.m. Wednesday and 8:25 a.m. Thursday, traveling at 1,300 miles per second. The events involve massive quantities of matter and electromagnetic radiation being released from the sun and traveling through space.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1996
The Antarctic wind near the bleak Adelie Coast last week was blowing at 46 mph. The temperature was hovering at 13 degrees below zero -- forbidding weather for most fliers.But to pilot Henry Perk, this was the kind of "break" he needed to get airborne in a place where the weather is often brutal. Mr. Perk had been hired to fly his twin-engine De Havilland Twin Otter to a remote spot 140 miles inland from the French coastal station at Dumont d'Urville, where a Johns Hopkins University solar telescope had parachuted to Earth after flying for more than 19 days beneath a helium balloon 25 miles above the ice.The telescope had survived despite a lost antenna, a wrong turn over the Ross Sea and a storm that struck after it landed.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
On Dec. 20, Johns Hopkins University astro-geophysicist David M. Rust plans to step out onto the Antarctic ice and launch the longest, most detailed observation of the sun ever attempted.Dr. Rust and five colleagues from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel are preparing to loft a converted "star wars" telescope 23 miles into the air beneath a giant helium balloon.Called the Flare Genesis Solar Observatory, the $16 million project is designed to unlock the mysteries of solar flares and gigantic magnetic storms that sometimes erupt from the sun's surface into interplanetary space.
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