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NEWS
April 8, 2010
It is imperative that state lawmakers pass the bill to increase the state's commitment to clean energy ("Measure hastens adoption of solar," April 6). Despite the attempt by some lawmakers to portray this negatively, the fact is that moving faster in adopting clean energy requirements provides numerous benefits to residents across the state. Passing the bill to expand solar energy would create more jobs, employing more Marylanders in high demand green collar industries. These jobs would be permanent, too, helping to grow our economy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The historic Rodgers Forge neighborhood in Towson has adopted guidelines for residents who want to install solar panels, an effort community leaders hope can strike a balance between preserving the community's architecture and embracing alternative energy. A committee of the Rodgers Forge Community Association worked for about a year to come up with the recommendations, which the full board approved in September, according to immediate past president Stu Sirota. "I think this shows that Rodgers Forge is a progressive neighborhood that cares about its history and maintaining the architectural integrity of its homes, while still being able to allow a modern and innovative green technology," Sirota said.
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NEWS
April 3, 2010
Maryland's Senate is backing a bill that would require power companies to increase the amount of electricity they buy from solar sources. Senators voted 31-15 Friday in favor of the legislation after days of debate. The bill would also increase penalties for companies that fail to buy the required percentage of electricity from solar sources. Some senators argued that companies would pass on those penalties to consumers and that Marylanders can't afford even slightly higher electricity bills.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Two solar flares that occurred this week are speeding toward Earth, possibly causing minor disruptions for radio technology and power grids, and also making the aurora borealis appear much farther south than normal. Neither flare was particularly powerful, but it's unusual that two moderate events would occur in such quick succession, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials said Thursday. They could combine to make for a moderate to strong geomagnetic storm on Earth.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Constellation Energy Group and McCormick & Co. have announced an agreement to develop a single rooftop solar installation that will have the largest capacity of any statewide, Constellation announced Thursday. Construction on the 1.8-megawatt solar photovoltaic power system should begin at McCormick's Belcamp distribution center in June and is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. Constellation will finance the project and will own and maintain the solar system for 20 years.
NEWS
February 1, 2010
Frederick County wants the state to help in adding solar collection systems on county buildings. County commissioners have approved a letter of interest to be sent to the Maryland Energy Administration about the public-private partnership. The state has $5 million to $6 million to install solar rooftop panels on state and local government buildings. The panels would allow the county to save on energy bills while giving a private developer the opportunity to install and retain ownership of the system.
NEWS
By LARRY WILLIAMS and LARRY WILLIAMS,IDEAS EDITOR | April 23, 2006
One oil company thinks solar energy is hot There's another way to think about that incredible 72 percent electric rate increase proposed for BGE customers this summer. Like the $3- or $4- or $5-a-gallon gasoline that may be just around the corner, it's a painful reminder of the Darwinian axiom that the future belongs to those who plan and evolve. Just ask the folks at BP Solar. The company, a subsidiary of the global oil giant, recently spent $25 million to more than double the capacity of a Frederick plant where it manufactures panels of solar electric cells designed to be mounted on the roofs of homes or businesses.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The home comes with a flat-screen TV, durable concrete counter tops, a deck and bamboo cabinets and floors. But the best feature of this one-bedroom, wood-frame house - designed, built and put on display in Washington this week by a team of University of Maryland students - is its power source. The sun. The house took two years to build and cost $440,000 - a bit steep for 800 square feet, even in today's inflated market. But this one is not for sale at any price. It's one of 18 solar-powered homes built by architecture and engineering students from schools around the country competing in the 2005 Solar Decathlon.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1999
One of the most mysterious of all nature's rhythms -- the 11-year rise and fall of solar activity -- is rising toward a violent climax, and scientists say society has never been more vulnerable.Since the last "solar maximum" in 1989, the networks of high-technology communications and satellites have expanded like condos on the beach -- smack in the path of the coming solar "storms."Space station astronauts will be working in harm's way. And electric utilities are more reliant on cross-country transmission lines that can behave something like Ben Franklin's kites during big solar events.
NEWS
May 10, 1996
FOR FREDERICK-BASED Solarex, the future is suddenly bright. For the first time in years, the solar-power business is growing -- at 20 percent a year. Third World countries see solar energy as a cheap way to bring electricity to thousands of far-flung villages. New technology has dramatically cut production costs and raised energy efficiency. Within a decade, the price of solar may yet be competitive with oil and gas.This is a marked change for an industry that has failed to meet expectations since Jimmy Carter pointed to solar energy as a cheap alternative to oil in the 1970s.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Ikea has expanded the solar energy system at its Perryville distribution center, making it by far the largest rooftop array in the state. The home furnishings retailer said Tuesday it began installing additional solar panels last fall to double the existing system's size. The 1.7 million-square-foot warehouse, built in 2002, employs about 550 workers and distributes inventory to many Ikea stores. The 4.9 megawatt energy system, made up of nearly 26,000 panels, now generates more than 6 million kilowatt hours of electricity a year, the equivalent of eliminating the emissions of 896 cars or powering 591 homes annually.
NEWS
June 22, 2014
Letter writer Jennifer Kunze ( "Md. ought to have cleaner air," June 17) is absolutely correct. We can and should have cleaner air. Maryland's legislature should step up its efforts to move our state toward a clean energy economy. The solar industry in Maryland is actually creating new jobs at a much faster rate than the dirty coal industry here without adding any pollution to the air we all breathe. In fact, U.S. solar jobs are growing ten times faster than the national average employment growth.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Countless famous footsteps have crossed the White House's entrance hall, but on Tuesday, some of the country's top science and technology dignitaries had to dodge a hovercraft made of foam and a paper bowl whizzing across the shiny pink-and-white marble. It was built by a group of five students at Patterson High School, selected among 30 research ventures for the fourth annual White House science fair. They won a place at the event by merit of a competition they won last fall, putting them in a room with President Barack Obama and with leaders of NASA, the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, who visited with the students and asked questions.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Think sunshine - not just sweetness - when you see the Domino Sugars sign lighting up the Inner Harbor at night. Solar panels have been installed on a rooftop at the sugar refinery off Key Highway to illuminate the neon fixture that's long been a landmark of the Baltimore skyline. The photovoltaic array is part of a push by Domino and its corporate parent, Florida-based ASR Group, to make the world's leading producer of cane sugar a little greener. With the $125,000 solar installation and other moves, "we hope to show Baltimore every day that sustainability is top-of-mind here and at our facilities across the globe," said Peter O'Malley, ASR Group's vice president of corporate relations.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Hundreds of acres of Maryland farmland that are protected from development at taxpayer expense could be turned into commercial wind or solar energy farms under legislation before the General Assembly. Farm groups and the O'Malley administration support the move, which they say could help struggling farmers stay viable while boosting prospects for "clean" renewable energy. Bills pending in House and Senate committees would let landowners who have sold their development rights to the state use up to 5 acres each for generating electricity from wind, sunshine or even decomposing animal and crop waste.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
When Ben Benokraitis bought a solar-powered water heater for his Baltimore County home two years ago, the installation company told him he'd get about $800 a year in payments to help offset the cost. That money would come from the sale of three Solar Renewable Energy Credits, or SRECs, his small system would create each year. His solar installer would broker the sales and send him a check. But instead of the $1,600 he expected in the past two years, Greenspring Energy passed along $225.25 — payment for a single credit — before laying off its workers and locking the doors to its home office in Timonium at the end of January.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | September 30, 2007
If you like sitting out on the patio at night but want to add a little light to your surroundings, there's another choice besides candles and tiki torches. While solar path lighting has been around for years, manufacturers only recently have introduced outdoor table lamps with rechargeable solar batteries. "The beauty of these lamps is that they don't look much different from indoor table lamps that are usually chosen based on decor style," writes Skip Teeters, outdoor lighting product manager for Hampton Bay and Home Depot, which recently came out with rechargeable solar table lamps.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
A powerful eruption on the sun's surface yesterday has sent a storm of solar particles and magnetic energy hurtling toward Earth at more than a million miles per hour. Scientists aren't sure yet what to expect when it arrives late tomorrow or early Friday. But electric utilities and satellite operators have been advised to prepare for possible disruptions from what is being described as the first big event of the current 11-year solar cycle. "It's rare. It's unusual. And we do anticipate a strong geomagnetic storm on June 8 and 9," said Ernie Hildner, director of the federal government's Space Environmental Center in Boulder, Colo.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
At Tom and Marcia Lewis' house in Annapolis, the future meets the past. Last year the couple installed solar panels on the roof of their 110-year-old frame house in the city's Historic District. "We're very much in favor of alternative energy sources," Marcia Lewis says. Residential solar energy sales are booming in the United States, and property owners are increasingly finding ways to combine historic preservation with energy preservation. The Lewises had their panels installed on the back roof of their three-story home on Conduit Street.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Energy supplier Constellation said Thursday that it added 38 megawatts of solar generation last year for business and government customers, including 3.6 megawatts in Maryland. Constellation, the Baltimore-based subsidiary of Exelon Corp., said its solar projects in operation or underway now top 164 megawatts. The company built projects last year in Arizona, California, New York and D.C. in addition to a local solar installation for the University of Maryland Medical System. Constellation owns and operates the projects, and its customers purchase the power.
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