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Sojourner Truth

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NEWS
By Carol Mason | February 18, 2004
A PROMINENT African-American woman bares her breast before a pulsing audience. The media go wild, and fallout from the act reverberates for years. But the year is 1858, not 2004, and the woman is Sojourner Truth. Sadly, the comparison between Ms. Truth and a modern Janet Jackson ends almost before it begins. A slave from her birth around 1799 to her emancipation in 1827, Sojourner Truth inspired black and white audiences as a preacher, a prominent abolitionist and a fervent supporter of women's rights.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
At 20 years old, R. Donahue Peebles was a penniless college dropout, he told an audience of hundreds Sunday, as the keynote speaker during the 30th commencement of Baltimore's Sojourner-Douglass College. Roughly seven years later, he was a multimillionaire real estate investor. And today, at 50, he's in the top 10 on Forbes' list of wealthiest African-Americans. His Florida-based company, Peebles Corp., is the largest African-American-owned real estate development business in the country, with a $4 billion portfolio and offices in Washington and Las Vegas.
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FEATURES
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Staff Writer | December 27, 1993
On June 1, 1843, a 6-foot-tall, jet-black woman named Isabella Van Wagenen felt called upon by God to travel and preach his word. The 46-year-old former slave left New York City to become an evangelist, preaching in Long Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut. She changed her name to Sojourner Truth, and would join the anti-slavery movement as a speaker advocating abolition and women's rights.Her fame as an abolitionist would grow to legendary proportions, particularly because of one speech given at a women's rights convention in Akron, Ohio, in 1851.
NEWS
December 5, 2007
The following are excerpts from the prepared text of Mayor Sheila Dixon's inaugural address: Sojourner Truth, a former slave who was once sold along with a herd of sheep for $100, felt compelled to respond to criticism that women were too weak and helpless to be given the right to vote. Sojourner Truth declared: "If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back, and get it right side up again."
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | February 18, 1993
Sojourner Truth, the illiterate former slave who became a spokeswoman for the rights of blacks and women, showed up at Southern Middle School yesterday, in the person of storyteller Alice McGill."
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | March 5, 1993
START YOUR ENGINESHorsepower, spinning tires and more-than-ample decibels of engine noise will rock the Baltimore Arena this weekend in the Ford/U.S. Hot Rod Motorsports Championship.Watch for a Hagerstown-based competitor, Michael Vators, in his 12-foot tall, 12,000-pound "monster truck," Black Stallion.Competitors also include a father-son team -- not Mario and Michael Andretti, but Dick and Jeff McPherson of Circleville, Ohio -- in two-wheel-drive trucks.Plus, you'll see a motocross -- racing motorcycles.
TOPIC
February 20, 2000
Sojourner Truth (1797-1883) was an abolitionist and a womens rights crusader. She was born a slave in Ulster County, New York, and did not win her freedom until 1827, when New York abolished slavery. In the 1830s, Truth, whose slave name was Isabella Van Wagenen, began to draw a following as a Methodist preacher in New York. She said she abandoned her slave name after a revelation from God. Truth became a traveling preacher, and in the mid-1840s, she joined a utopian commune in Massachusetts, where she joined the abolition and womens rights campaigns.
NEWS
December 5, 2007
The following are excerpts from the prepared text of Mayor Sheila Dixon's inaugural address: Sojourner Truth, a former slave who was once sold along with a herd of sheep for $100, felt compelled to respond to criticism that women were too weak and helpless to be given the right to vote. Sojourner Truth declared: "If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back, and get it right side up again."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It's a good thing that Adelaide Johnson chose a 13-ton block of marble for her suffragist statue. Anything lighter would have cracked by now under the pressure of so much symbolism.In 1920, the sculptor's tribute to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony was carved against a rough-hewn background to represent the unfinished nature of the women's rights struggle. As Johnson explained at the time: Women's work is never done. How right she was.Congress refused to accept this gift until the National Woman's Party president, Alice Paul, had the statue literally dragged by mules to the Capitol steps.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk | February 21, 1992
Jacobsville Elementary will celebrate Black History Month with two presentations by storyteller Alice McGill this morning.At 8:50 a.m., students in kindergarten through second grade will hear "Songs andTales of African-American and American Folklore.""Ms. McGill will introduce many traditional songs, stories and chants that are deeply rooted in the history of black Americans both before and after the Civil War," said Jane Reidy, PTA spokesman.At 9:50 a.m., grades three to five will observe McGill's transformation into 83-year-old Sojourner Truth, a former slave who without formal schooling became one of the most influential voices in the 19th century.
NEWS
By Carol Mason | February 18, 2004
A PROMINENT African-American woman bares her breast before a pulsing audience. The media go wild, and fallout from the act reverberates for years. But the year is 1858, not 2004, and the woman is Sojourner Truth. Sadly, the comparison between Ms. Truth and a modern Janet Jackson ends almost before it begins. A slave from her birth around 1799 to her emancipation in 1827, Sojourner Truth inspired black and white audiences as a preacher, a prominent abolitionist and a fervent supporter of women's rights.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2003
A decade ago, Sojourner-Douglass College was suffering financial troubles that included tax liens, plummeting enrollments and termination of its federal student loan program. Its problems were so serious that the state threatened to close it. Since then, the East Baltimore-based school has quietly engineered a sevenfold growth in enrollment and become financially solvent, and is on the verge of launching its first capital fund-raising campaign, with a target of $5 million. The school's president and founder, who has led its reclamation, is frustrated that his institution still struggles for respectability -- most recently in Anne Arundel County.
TOPIC
February 20, 2000
Sojourner Truth (1797-1883) was an abolitionist and a womens rights crusader. She was born a slave in Ulster County, New York, and did not win her freedom until 1827, when New York abolished slavery. In the 1830s, Truth, whose slave name was Isabella Van Wagenen, began to draw a following as a Methodist preacher in New York. She said she abandoned her slave name after a revelation from God. Truth became a traveling preacher, and in the mid-1840s, she joined a utopian commune in Massachusetts, where she joined the abolition and womens rights campaigns.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It's a good thing that Adelaide Johnson chose a 13-ton block of marble for her suffragist statue. Anything lighter would have cracked by now under the pressure of so much symbolism.In 1920, the sculptor's tribute to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony was carved against a rough-hewn background to represent the unfinished nature of the women's rights struggle. As Johnson explained at the time: Women's work is never done. How right she was.Congress refused to accept this gift until the National Woman's Party president, Alice Paul, had the statue literally dragged by mules to the Capitol steps.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
Thousands of people flocked yesterday to the 5th Regiment Armory for the city's third annual People's Expo, turning part of downtown Baltimore into a celebration of African-American culture and commerce."
FEATURES
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Staff Writer | December 27, 1993
On June 1, 1843, a 6-foot-tall, jet-black woman named Isabella Van Wagenen felt called upon by God to travel and preach his word. The 46-year-old former slave left New York City to become an evangelist, preaching in Long Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut. She changed her name to Sojourner Truth, and would join the anti-slavery movement as a speaker advocating abolition and women's rights.Her fame as an abolitionist would grow to legendary proportions, particularly because of one speech given at a women's rights convention in Akron, Ohio, in 1851.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
Thousands of people flocked yesterday to the 5th Regiment Armory for the city's third annual People's Expo, turning part of downtown Baltimore into a celebration of African-American culture and commerce."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
At 20 years old, R. Donahue Peebles was a penniless college dropout, he told an audience of hundreds Sunday, as the keynote speaker during the 30th commencement of Baltimore's Sojourner-Douglass College. Roughly seven years later, he was a multimillionaire real estate investor. And today, at 50, he's in the top 10 on Forbes' list of wealthiest African-Americans. His Florida-based company, Peebles Corp., is the largest African-American-owned real estate development business in the country, with a $4 billion portfolio and offices in Washington and Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | March 5, 1993
START YOUR ENGINESHorsepower, spinning tires and more-than-ample decibels of engine noise will rock the Baltimore Arena this weekend in the Ford/U.S. Hot Rod Motorsports Championship.Watch for a Hagerstown-based competitor, Michael Vators, in his 12-foot tall, 12,000-pound "monster truck," Black Stallion.Competitors also include a father-son team -- not Mario and Michael Andretti, but Dick and Jeff McPherson of Circleville, Ohio -- in two-wheel-drive trucks.Plus, you'll see a motocross -- racing motorcycles.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | February 18, 1993
Sojourner Truth, the illiterate former slave who became a spokeswoman for the rights of blacks and women, showed up at Southern Middle School yesterday, in the person of storyteller Alice McGill."
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