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By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | February 11, 1991
Sojourner-Douglass College is appealing an order by the U.S. Department of Education to terminate its student loan and grant programs, a department spokesman says.A hearing before an Education Department administrative law judge is scheduled for Feb. 20 in Washington.Six months ago, the department ordered a halt to all federal student aid programs at Sojourner-Douglass after college President Charles W. Simmons failed to answer a federal inspector general's subpoena for 50 student transcripts.
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NEWS
April 10, 2014
As a senior at Sojourner-Douglass College who is scheduled to graduate next year, I am quite concerned about the financial issues the school is having ( "With Sojourner-Douglass' accreditation in jeopardy, students in limbo," March 30). My major is business administration. I worked hard and took my education seriously but if the school does not meet the Sept. 1 deadline for keeping its accreditation, I don't know what will happen to my credits. I am an older student and this would be a setback for me. The academics at this school are great, as are our teachers.
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NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2005
The Edgewater campus of Sojourner-Douglass College will remain standing, but the legal wrangling continues. The case, between a homeowner's association and the facility's developer, centers on whether the building of the campus, at Routes 2 and 214, violated a 1988 covenant that required the 6-acre parcel to remain "undeveloped, except for educational facilities in conjunction with the Anne Arundel County Board of Education." A three-judge panel of the Court of Special Appeals recently rejected a motion to order the 16,000-square-foot, one-story building razed, though the panel reversed a lower court decision in favor of the developer.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
Your recent story on Sojourner Douglass College revealed these students' distress and uncertainty about their futures ( "With Sojourner-Douglass' accreditation in jeopardy, students in limbo," March 30). As an African-American who once experienced a similar situation at Morgan State University in the 1960s, I'm feeling those students' pain. During my four-years at Morgan our college was constantly and consistently underfunded and ignored while students were treated as second-class citizens by being denied the most basic necessities.
NEWS
July 18, 1991
Figures from 1989 indicate that Sojourner-Douglass College in East Baltimore continues to be listed by the U.S. Department of Education as an institution with high student loan default rates, according to a list released by the department yesterday.The private college, at 500 N. Caroline St., had its federal student loan and grant programs terminated last summer after President Charles W. Simmons failed to answer an inspector general subpoena for 50 student transcripts.The college appealed the termination order and a hearing was held Feb. 20 in Washington.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 16, 2005
Nearly 300 people turned out at a rally yesterday to support Sojourner-Douglass College, the historically black Baltimore college that may have to tear down a new satellite campus in Edgewater because of a recent appeals court ruling. "We need the college there," said Sheila M. Finlayson, president of the Teachers Association of Anne Arundel County and among those who attended the rally. Protesters gathered at an Annapolis church, then marched to the steps of the Maryland Courts of Appeals building, where the case is pending.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2003
A decade ago, Sojourner-Douglass College was suffering financial troubles that included tax liens, plummeting enrollments and termination of its federal student loan program. Its problems were so serious that the state threatened to close it. Since then, the East Baltimore-based school has quietly engineered a sevenfold growth in enrollment and become financially solvent, and is on the verge of launching its first capital fund-raising campaign, with a target of $5 million. The school's president and founder, who has led its reclamation, is frustrated that his institution still struggles for respectability -- most recently in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Gabriel Baird and Gabriel Baird,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2002
Jamie Lamartin of Annapolis started college immediately after high school, but life got in the way. She married a fellow student, and they started a family. She dropped out with every intention of returning for a degree. But even when her son entered school, there wasn't enough time. "I was never able to finish," said Lamartin, 49. Now she is back in classes at the Annapolis campus of the Baltimore-based Sojourner-Douglass College, which caters to nontraditional students such as Lamartin.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | August 21, 1993
State officials have ordered Sojourner-Douglass College in East Baltimore to stop enrolling new students for three months and are threatening to close down the college unless it can provide evidence of financial stability.State higher education Secretary Shaila R. Aery this week instructed Sojourner-Douglass to stop soliciting or enrolling new students until Nov. 20. If an audit of the school's finances is not submitted by then, the college's license to operate will be revoked, Dr. Aery said.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | January 4, 1993
Sojourner-Douglass College, the small financially troubled East Baltimore institution, owes the federal government more than $191,000 in back taxes, court records show.The Internal Revenue Service filed two liens against the college recently for unpaid Social Security and income tax withholding totaling $191,036, according to court records here.The unpaid taxes date back to 1988, but more than half, $96,000, are from the first six months of 1992. The IRS also filed two liens against the college in October, totaling $5,836 in unpaid taxes.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
I feel bad for Sojourner-Douglass College students who may see the value of their diplomas go up in smoke ( "With Sojourner-Douglass' accreditation in jeopardy, students in limbo," March 30). Until I became involved with Baltimore International College's similar accreditation problems, I had no idea of the power the Middle States Commission on Higher Education enjoys. More than two years ago the culinary arts and hospitality management school was about to lose its accreditation as well, and since I lived in the neighborhood, the thought of an enormous, empty building was alarming.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Theo Jones is set to graduate from Sojourner-Douglass College with a nursing degree in November, but instead of celebrating as he nears the finish line, he's left wondering if he should transfer to another school. Sojourner-Douglass was ordered this month by its accrediting body to "show cause" or prove why it should not lose its accreditation, and Jones is one of the many students who are deeply worried about their futures. Jones said he's made inquiries to five potential employers in recent weeks, and all have asked him about the school's accreditation status.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Sojourner-Douglass College in Baltimore is in danger of losing its accreditation and faces serious financial challenges, leaving the small private college's future uncertain. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education, the accrediting body for colleges in Maryland and several other states, directed Sojourner-Douglass College officials last week to "show cause," or prove by Sept. 1 why its accreditation should not be revoked. The college's president, Charles W. Simmons, said Wednesday that officials were in the midst of a plan to rescue the institution's finances and they believed they were close to having at least one investor commit money to help.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 7, 2011
Donald Vincent Williams, the retired Baltimore City schools director of physical education, died of cancer Dec. 26 at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 70 and lived in Woodlawn. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Turners Station, he was a 1960 graduate of Sollers Point Junior-Senior High School. He earned a bachelor's degree at what is now the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and belonged to the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity. He played baseball and ran track.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
At 20 years old, R. Donahue Peebles was a penniless college dropout, he told an audience of hundreds Sunday, as the keynote speaker during the 30th commencement of Baltimore's Sojourner-Douglass College. Roughly seven years later, he was a multimillionaire real estate investor. And today, at 50, he's in the top 10 on Forbes' list of wealthiest African-Americans. His Florida-based company, Peebles Corp., is the largest African-American-owned real estate development business in the country, with a $4 billion portfolio and offices in Washington and Las Vegas.
NEWS
October 24, 2007
On October 20, 2007, Ruby Glover Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, 4300 Wabash Ave. on Thursday from 9am to 8pm and on Friday from 9am until 3pm. A Musical Tribute will be held on Thursday from 6pm to 10pm at Sojourner-Douglass College, 200 N. Central Ave. where the family will receive friends. The family will also receive friends on Friday at 6pm, City Temple Baptist Church, 317 Dolphin St., where funeral services will follow at 7pm.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
A board member for the community association closest to Sojourner-Douglass College's proposed Edgewater campus is recommending that his neighborhood ask Anne Arundel County zoning officials and the county school board to halt the project. A 26-page report written by board member Michel S. Pawlowski of South River Colony Conservancy includes a proposed letter to the county zoning office demanding that the college be denied permits to build at Routes 2 and 214. It also includes a form to petition the school board for a public hearing.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Edgewater residents seeking to keep Sojourner-Douglass College out of their neighborhood had their day in court Friday, arguing that the historically black college's campus is not permitted under land-use plans for the area. College officials, meanwhile, said their plans to build a branch on the 6-acre property fit under a covenant that says the land could only be developed for educational uses. The two sides now await a verdict from Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth. The London Towne Property Owners' Association and Edgewater resident John Yannone said they filed the court action to protect a 16-year-old covenant governing their area.
NEWS
July 22, 2007
ISSUE: -- The board of an Edgewater charter school voted unanimously July 12 to close, after what started as a search for more space ended with the principal's resignation. Officials with KIPP Harbor Academy had said that it could not easily replace Principal Jallon Brown, one of its specially trained leaders, so the school had to be shuttered. Brown said she stepped down because 10 of her 12 teachers found new jobs between an initial June 20 announcement that the school would close and the reversal of that decision a week later.
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