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Lorraine Mirabella | April 24, 2014
Under Armourwill open its newest Brand House store -- its largest yet -- today in New York's SoHo district in a building once owned by John Jacob Astor. The Baltimore-based sports apparel maker hopes to attract international tourists and other visitors to the two-level store at 583 Broadway, which is expected to help raise the brand's global profile as well as highlight the fast-growing women's and footwear categories. "It is an enormous strategic play that we believe complements our overall distribution strategy and ultimately will lift all channels of distribution,"  including sales online and through specialty sporting goods stores, said Susie McCabe, Under Armour's vice president of global retail.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | April 24, 2014
Under Armourwill open its newest Brand House store -- its largest yet -- today in New York's SoHo district in a building once owned by John Jacob Astor. The Baltimore-based sports apparel maker hopes to attract international tourists and other visitors to the two-level store at 583 Broadway, which is expected to help raise the brand's global profile as well as highlight the fast-growing women's and footwear categories. "It is an enormous strategic play that we believe complements our overall distribution strategy and ultimately will lift all channels of distribution,"  including sales online and through specialty sporting goods stores, said Susie McCabe, Under Armour's vice president of global retail.
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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | June 13, 2007
The southern stretch of Light Street in Federal Hill is steadily attracting a diverse blend of solid restaurants. The Soho Eatery, a Japanese, Korean and sushi restaurant/carryout, is the most recent addition. Soho Eatery 1504 Light St. -- 410-685-2989 Hours --11 a.m.-3 p.m. and 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Fridays; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturdays best bite If you're extra hungry or want to share with a friend, go for the Chirashi, $13.60. More than 20 pieces of sliced sashimi came on a bed of sticky white sushi rice.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | June 13, 2007
The southern stretch of Light Street in Federal Hill is steadily attracting a diverse blend of solid restaurants. The Soho Eatery, a Japanese, Korean and sushi restaurant/carryout, is the most recent addition. Soho Eatery 1504 Light St. -- 410-685-2989 Hours --11 a.m.-3 p.m. and 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Fridays; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturdays best bite If you're extra hungry or want to share with a friend, go for the Chirashi, $13.60. More than 20 pieces of sliced sashimi came on a bed of sticky white sushi rice.
FEATURES
By Amy Spindler and Amy Spindler,New York Times News Service | January 6, 1994
Todd Oldham's spring runway show felt like an epiphany, a moment where shards of his ideas from the past, of mirrors, gilt and decorated fabrics, fell away to reveal the talent beneath.Surreal, nostalgic and futuristic, that show signaled that Mr. Oldham was ready to step forward.That step will be taken this year. Mr. Oldham will be the latest artist in residence on Wooster Street in March, when he moves his offices and showroom to SoHo. He is looking for boutique space on the street as well.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
NASA officials say a broken antenna motor is about to silence the $1 billion SOHO spacecraft, one of the world's most complex and successful solar observatories. The failure will cause a 19-day loss of signal once every three months. It will interrupt some scientific research and crimp the system that warns of approaching geomagnetic storms. Sweeping outward from the sun, these storms can damage satellites, endanger spacewalking astronauts and disrupt communications and power distribution on the ground.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 13, 1997
I admit that I don't have a sophisticated lifestyle. I don't party all night in trendy clubs with people whose hair is the color of Jell-O. My idea of an exciting evening is to go out at 7: 45 p.m.and get a medium dish of frozen yogurt with -- sometimes you have to walk on the wild side, darn it -- low-fat chocolate topping.I live on a peaceful street where there's hardly any noise except for a neighbor's pet parrot, which has been trying for years to make some kind of important announcement, but unfortunately cannot get past the first syllable, which is "Graak!"
NEWS
March 18, 2004
An interview with Jacqueline Easley, founder of the Soho Bookworms of Howard County. Why did you start the book club? I've always been an avid reader since I was little, but I fell out of the act of reading after I got out of college and started working. About four years ago, I read the book Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri. It is a collection of short stories about the Indian-American immigrant experience. The book was so beautifully crafted. The characters were compelling. I was reminded how satisfying an experience it is to read a good book.
FEATURES
By Anne-Marie Schiro and Anne-Marie Schiro,New York Times News Service | August 11, 1994
Computerized beautyThe September issue of Mirabella carries the cover line "Who is the face of America?" next to the image of a blank-eyed young woman with flawless suntanned skin, perfect pink lips and damp brown hair that falls below her shoulders.Traces of sand and droplets of moisture cling to her face and bare shoulder as if she'd just emerged from the sea, like Botticelli's Venus.She is just as much an ideal.She's not a model or an actress or the girl next door, but a computerized collage of features of models of different ethnic backgrounds assembled by the photographer Hiro.
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Contributing Writer | April 4, 1993
New York -- There are plenty of reasonably priced things to do in costly Manhattan, and one of them is sleeping over. Responding to pressures from bargain hunters in these tough times, many established hotels and some upstarts are charging rates that won't take a big bite out of your Big Apple budget.Options range from swank hostelries in prime locations to bare-bones deals that will appeal mainly to those who are content with few amenities -- and perhaps a bathroom down the hall.Here are 10 hotels whose rates start at less than $100 per night (excluding taxes)
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
CINNAMON KISS Walter Mosley Little, Brown / 308 pages. Reviewing books is hardly an objective pursuit, but it's made more subjective when trying to measure a writer's potential for posterity. Walter Mosley's was established almost as soon as he introduced his signature protagonist, Easy Rawlins, a decade and a half ago. Now, with Cinnamon Kiss, Easy hasmoved forward almost 20 years, surviving riots, racial tensions and thorny relationships in achieving a complex balance. When he is asked to investigate the disappearance of a prominent lawyer and his unsettlingly beautiful assistant (and possible lover)
NEWS
March 18, 2004
An interview with Jacqueline Easley, founder of the Soho Bookworms of Howard County. Why did you start the book club? I've always been an avid reader since I was little, but I fell out of the act of reading after I got out of college and started working. About four years ago, I read the book Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri. It is a collection of short stories about the Indian-American immigrant experience. The book was so beautifully crafted. The characters were compelling. I was reminded how satisfying an experience it is to read a good book.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
Frank Mentesana and Jerome Audureau believe everyone deep down is a cook. What they offer in Once Upon a Tart ... (Alfred A. Knopf, 2003, $27.50) are recipes that will make folks believe it. Most of the 225 recipes in the book are for dishes they serve in their beloved restaurant of the same name in New York's SoHo district. Here are simple foods -- soups, sandwiches, salads, cookies and, of course, tarts created with a sense of flair and imagination. A zucchini tart is flavored with curry and currants; spinach and sweet peas are paired in a soup and flavored with mint; spiced pumpkin scones are matched with fresh cranberries.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
NASA officials say a broken antenna motor is about to silence the $1 billion SOHO spacecraft, one of the world's most complex and successful solar observatories. The failure will cause a 19-day loss of signal once every three months. It will interrupt some scientific research and crimp the system that warns of approaching geomagnetic storms. Sweeping outward from the sun, these storms can damage satellites, endanger spacewalking astronauts and disrupt communications and power distribution on the ground.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 1999
More than a 100 years ago, the textile mills in Woodberry produced most of the cotton canvas in America. The mills have long since closed but, in an ironic twist, canvas again has become a very important part of life in this industrial village along the Jones Falls.Artists looking for large, cheap studio space in which to paint have moved into these once vacant industrial spaces, creating a unique artists' community in the process. With sculptors, metal smiths, jewelry makers and potters, the painters have in the past 10 years been transforming the area's industrial architecture into a Baltimore version of SoHo, New York's artist district housed in cast-iron warehouses.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | August 8, 1999
NEW YORK -- Ex-Seinfeld girl Shoshanna Lonstein dashes into SoHo's Helena Rubinstein spa for a quick beauty fix. Across the street at Origins, a client savors a complimentary back massage. Around the corner at Sephora, customers graze on samples, dabbing lipstick on wrists and spritzing on fragrances.SoHo, an urban utopia throbbing with hip designer stores, A-list eateries and attractive denizens, has added one more alluring reference to its resume: the world's ultimate makeup mecca.Formerly known for exclusive art galleries, the trend-setting area has witnessed an explosion of freestanding cosmetic stores since the mid-'90s.
NEWS
November 23, 1994
Support for ArtThe plan to make the 400 block of North Howard Street into an artist colony -- Baltimore's "Soho" -- certainly sounds great and looks good on paper.But I wonder if anyone has really checked into the art market in Baltimore. Years ago, an artist colony was planned for East Baltimore Street near Johns Hopkins Hospital. One never hears anything more about this.While the idea is a good one, in order for it to work, people in Baltimore must financially support the artists with meaningful purchases.
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
CINNAMON KISS Walter Mosley Little, Brown / 308 pages. Reviewing books is hardly an objective pursuit, but it's made more subjective when trying to measure a writer's potential for posterity. Walter Mosley's was established almost as soon as he introduced his signature protagonist, Easy Rawlins, a decade and a half ago. Now, with Cinnamon Kiss, Easy hasmoved forward almost 20 years, surviving riots, racial tensions and thorny relationships in achieving a complex balance. When he is asked to investigate the disappearance of a prominent lawyer and his unsettlingly beautiful assistant (and possible lover)
FEATURES
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | March 15, 1998
NEW YORK -- SoHo has become a food lover's dream. Longtime neighborhood ultra-grocery Dean & DeLuca makes a great place to start a walking tour of some of the city's most interesting culinary destinations.Take the yellow line to the Prince Street subway station; the address is 560 Broadway at Prince.Of course, you'll want to stop at Dean & DeLuca to see what food-fashion-conscious New Yorkers are putting in their checkout baskets these days: organic doughnuts, Out of a Flower sorbets, roasted root vegetables and Berkshire Farms ice creams.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 13, 1997
I admit that I don't have a sophisticated lifestyle. I don't party all night in trendy clubs with people whose hair is the color of Jell-O. My idea of an exciting evening is to go out at 7: 45 p.m.and get a medium dish of frozen yogurt with -- sometimes you have to walk on the wild side, darn it -- low-fat chocolate topping.I live on a peaceful street where there's hardly any noise except for a neighbor's pet parrot, which has been trying for years to make some kind of important announcement, but unfortunately cannot get past the first syllable, which is "Graak!"
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