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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
To call Smaltimore, the Canton bar that replaced Lager's Pub in July, "busy" on a recent Sunday afternoon would be a severe understatement. Surrounded by almost all New York Giants fans - the rowdy type, as if there is any other kind - I took two steps forward through the main entrance and quickly realized that would be as far as I could comfortably go. It was a shoulder-to-shoulder playoff atmosphere, filled with fans rooting for a team that would...
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NEWS
By John B. Chessare | April 17, 2014
Americans should not be deterred from working to improve our health care system despite difficulties with implementing the websites of the health insurance exchanges as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Our resolve for improved health care should be stronger than ever. The U.S. has the best doctors and nurses in the world, and they work very hard, but they work every day in a broken system. We spend 40 percent more per capita on care than other countries, yet we do not provide coverage for all of our citizens.
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NEWS
May 30, 1995
Increased competition -- usually a good deal for consumers -- is in prospect for banking by personal computer, a field on the verge of explosive growth. With the collapse of Microsoft's $2.1 billion plan to acquire Intuit and its popular home-banking software system (Quicken), there could be a fierce scramble in a lucrative market.For the Justice Department's anti-trust division, Microsoft's uncharacteristic withdrawal from the field of battle is a doubly sweet victory. It helps division morale after being chastised by a federal judge for being too soft on Microsoft in an earlier unfair business practices case.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Under Armour CEO and founder Kevin Plank and celebrity judges will pick from six finalists Friday in the annual Cupid's Cup national entrepreneurship competition. The annual competition, designed to foster interest in student entrepreneurship, is chaired by Plank in partnership with the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. It's open to undergraduate and graduate-level students at U.S. colleges and universities, as well as recent graduates.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
Last year, Baltimore court officials sent a quarter-million summonses to potential jurors, culled from driver's license and voting records, knowing that only a fraction — about 27 percent — of those called would show up. The city has tried offering restaurant coupons, parking discounts and a "Juror Appreciation Week" to bring in more people over the years — threatening some of the worst truants with jail time — but the efforts have largely...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Under Armour CEO and founder Kevin Plank and celebrity judges will pick from six finalists Friday in the annual Cupid's Cup national entrepreneurship competition. The annual competition, designed to foster interest in student entrepreneurship, is chaired by Plank in partnership with the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. It's open to undergraduate and graduate-level students at U.S. colleges and universities, as well as recent graduates.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Howard County ambulances are using a new communications system that enables some heart attack victims to get faster, better treatment when they arrive at Howard County General Hospital. Patients experiencing a STEMI — or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, which threatens the heart muscle and requires a balloon angioplasty and a stent to keep an artery open — would benefit from the new technology, officials said. The American Heart Association says 400,000 people suffer STEMI heart attacks each year in the United States.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 7, 2012
When a fire broke out at a Canton warehouse April 22 and firefighters confirmed there were dangerous chemicals inside the building, it spawned some basic questions for reporters. What sorts of chemicals were present, and what risks do they pose? Did they cause any harm to people, animals or the environment? Officials with the fire department and Maryland Department of the Environment were forthcoming, explaining that powerful acids were stored in the warehouse for use in anodizing metals.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
The Columbia Association has agreed to pay a local consultant $150,000 to determine whether the troubled accounting and customer service software system, under development for much of the past decade, should be saved or scrapped. KPMG, with offices in Baltimore and Washington, has eight weeks to make recommendations on what to do with the Customer Services System computer software, said Rob Goldman, CA's chief operating officer. "They're going to provide CA options," he said.
NEWS
By John B. Chessare | April 17, 2014
Americans should not be deterred from working to improve our health care system despite difficulties with implementing the websites of the health insurance exchanges as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Our resolve for improved health care should be stronger than ever. The U.S. has the best doctors and nurses in the world, and they work very hard, but they work every day in a broken system. We spend 40 percent more per capita on care than other countries, yet we do not provide coverage for all of our citizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
To call Smaltimore, the Canton bar that replaced Lager's Pub in July, "busy" on a recent Sunday afternoon would be a severe understatement. Surrounded by almost all New York Giants fans - the rowdy type, as if there is any other kind - I took two steps forward through the main entrance and quickly realized that would be as far as I could comfortably go. It was a shoulder-to-shoulder playoff atmosphere, filled with fans rooting for a team that would...
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 7, 2012
When a fire broke out at a Canton warehouse April 22 and firefighters confirmed there were dangerous chemicals inside the building, it spawned some basic questions for reporters. What sorts of chemicals were present, and what risks do they pose? Did they cause any harm to people, animals or the environment? Officials with the fire department and Maryland Department of the Environment were forthcoming, explaining that powerful acids were stored in the warehouse for use in anodizing metals.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
Last year, Baltimore court officials sent a quarter-million summonses to potential jurors, culled from driver's license and voting records, knowing that only a fraction — about 27 percent — of those called would show up. The city has tried offering restaurant coupons, parking discounts and a "Juror Appreciation Week" to bring in more people over the years — threatening some of the worst truants with jail time — but the efforts have largely...
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Howard County ambulances are using a new communications system that enables some heart attack victims to get faster, better treatment when they arrive at Howard County General Hospital. Patients experiencing a STEMI — or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, which threatens the heart muscle and requires a balloon angioplasty and a stent to keep an artery open — would benefit from the new technology, officials said. The American Heart Association says 400,000 people suffer STEMI heart attacks each year in the United States.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
The Columbia Association has agreed to pay a local consultant $150,000 to determine whether the troubled accounting and customer service software system, under development for much of the past decade, should be saved or scrapped. KPMG, with offices in Baltimore and Washington, has eight weeks to make recommendations on what to do with the Customer Services System computer software, said Rob Goldman, CA's chief operating officer. "They're going to provide CA options," he said.
NEWS
By Avi Rubin | September 16, 2008
When it comes to voting technology, Maryland will soon take a big - and welcome - step backward. In 2004, the state switched almost all of its precincts to Diebold touch-screen voting equipment, called direct recording electronic machines (DREs). In 2006, Maryland adopted these devices for all precincts. But when we cast ballots for president this November, Maryland will use DREs for the last time in a statewide election. In 2010, we will return to a low-tech but far more secure system: optically scanned paper ballots.
NEWS
December 6, 2005
Richard Marc Belkov, a software systems consultant and boater, died of cancer Friday at his Crownsville home. He was 56. Mr. Belkov was born in Baltimore and raised in Howard Park. He was a 1966 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned a bachelor's degree in business from Rutgers University in 1974. For nearly two decades until the company was dissolved in 1993, Mr. Belkov was a partner in Atlantic Information Management Inc. in Bridgewater, N.J. He moved from Flemington, N.J., to Crownsville in 1991 and went to work in 1995 for Tricom Computer Co. After the company was sold in 2003, he worked as a computer software consultant.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
Ronald J. Gralewicz, a computer software system engineer and registered nurse who worked weekends at a rehabilitation center for brain trauma patients, died of heart failure Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 57 and lived in Lochearn. Mr. Gralewicz worked for many years in the Washington and Baltimore area as a computer specialist. Most recently, he was employed by Global Management Systems Inc. and was working on a contract job at the Office of Child Support at Social Security Administration headquarters in Woodlawn.
NEWS
December 6, 2005
Richard Marc Belkov, a software systems consultant and boater, died of cancer Friday at his Crownsville home. He was 56. Mr. Belkov was born in Baltimore and raised in Howard Park. He was a 1966 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned a bachelor's degree in business from Rutgers University in 1974. For nearly two decades until the company was dissolved in 1993, Mr. Belkov was a partner in Atlantic Information Management Inc. in Bridgewater, N.J. He moved from Flemington, N.J., to Crownsville in 1991 and went to work in 1995 for Tricom Computer Co. After the company was sold in 2003, he worked as a computer software consultant.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2002
The day after a jury awarded his software company $276 million in a civil fraud case, Scott Steele could, of course, have been on an airplane to someplace warm, where he could forget about the stressful lawsuit while engaging in his chief avocation: fishing for sailfish, white marlin or blue marlin. But not Steele. Yesterday, the 44-year-old president of Steele Software Systems Corp. was back at work at his Catonsville company, fishing instead for ways his technology company could build on the momentum it has managed to achieve in recent months, in spite of the distracting lawsuit.
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