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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 20, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday. Microsoft Corp. and other software publishers gained after reporting better-than-expected earnings, but the Dow Jones industrial average fell.The Nasdaq composite index climbed 2.40 to 1138.70 -- its 13th record this year and the third this week -- bringing this year's return to 8.23 percent, the best among major U.S. stock market )) averages. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 1.45 to 645.06. Microsoft is in both indexes.The Dow industrials sank 16.26 to 5,535.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 2, 2004
Software helps educators meet new standards Reporter Alec MacGillis' series "Poor Schools, Rich Targets" (Sept. 19-Sept. 21) attempted to cast doubt on the efficacy of educational software and the practices of software publishers. While our industry welcomes honest criticism, the series ignored or skewed important facts, and this causes us to contest its conclusions. Educational software companies are partnering with educators to move toward the common goal of modernizing school practice and preparing students for the 21st century.
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BUSINESS
By John Markoff and John Markoff,New York Times News Service n | March 24, 1992
An organization representing the nation's largest publishers of software for desktop computers is close to completing a confidential agreement with the National Security Agency to permit the sale abroad of programs that contain special data-security functions.Sales of software with the ability to encode information are now tightly controlled by the agency, a State Department unit that licenses the export of weapons.But U.S. software publishers have been putting pressure on the government to loosen controls on programs that contain such cryptographic features because they are hampering the ability of American companies to compete internationally.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | February 28, 2002
HIPPOCRATES, the founding father of modern medicine, issued this famous dictum to generations of doctors: Make a habit of two things - to help, or at least do no harm. He might as well have been talking to software publishers, too. All too often, I hear tales of woe from users who install new software that not only doesn't work, but turns the computer into a $1,500 doorstop. Consider the reader who took my advice in an earlier column and downloaded the latest security patches from Microsoft.
BUSINESS
By Jim McNair and Jim McNair,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 29, 1992
...TC Many new-wave criminals don't carry guns or smoke crack. More likely, they wear suits, work with computers and make purchasing decisions.They're software pirates, people who make copies of personal computer software programs, breaking federal copyright law. To the U.S. software industry, they are a $2.4 billion-a-year problem that is no longer a mere nuisance."
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 11, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Business has never been better for producers of 3 1/2 -inch floppy disks, the pocket-size, hard-shell data repositories most personal computer owners use to get their new software into their machines.Business these days appears to be too good. Demand for the little plastic platters is so heavy that the world's manufacturers simply can't keep up with it. By some published estimates, the industry is producing about 52 million of the diskettes a month -- about 6 million to 8 million too few for current demand.
BUSINESS
By John Markoff and John Markoff,New York Times News Service D | June 10, 1991
Software giant Microsoft Corp. has joined the ranks of computer companies using a software security system that has sparked concern among some government crime fighters.The system is being deployed by a growing number of computer makers and software publishers -- including Digital, Lotus and Novell -- to protect and authenticate electronic mail messages and documents stored in computers. It can be used to create a "digital signature" on a message or document and to protect electronic mail from eavesdropping.
BUSINESS
By Rick Ratliff and Rick Ratliff,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 9, 1991
DETROIT -- Wayne Goldzweig's business card lists his employer as the Data-Trak Corp. His title is senior technical consultant. The company address is Suite 100 in a building on Philomene Boulevard in Lincoln Park, Mich. Call the phone number and you get a receptionist.It all sounds so impressive.But the receptionist is actually an answering service. The Philomene address is not an office building but Mr. Goldzweig's tiny brick bungalow. There is no "Suite 100," unless it is the spare bedroom where Mr. Goldzweig keeps his computer.
BUSINESS
By William M. Bulkeley and William M. Bulkeley,The Wall Street Journal | May 13, 1991
Once upon a time, software makers asserted that pricing played no part in customers' purchase decisions. Customers looked at features, user support programs, future directions, compatibility -- everything but price, the marketers said.But now, price wars -- the bugaboo of mature product lines like color televisions -- are being waged in the personal computer software business.Three of the industry's biggest players are engaged in vicious price promotions for their spreadsheets, wooing one another's customers with cut-price offers and giving away complimentary products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | February 28, 2002
HIPPOCRATES, the founding father of modern medicine, issued this famous dictum to generations of doctors: Make a habit of two things - to help, or at least do no harm. He might as well have been talking to software publishers, too. All too often, I hear tales of woe from users who install new software that not only doesn't work, but turns the computer into a $1,500 doorstop. Consider the reader who took my advice in an earlier column and downloaded the latest security patches from Microsoft.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 13, 1998
PARSIPPANY, N.J. -- Cendant Corp. said yesterday that it has hired Credit Suisse First Boston to sell its consumer software business and has agreed to sell an Internet publishing unit for about $510 million in cash and stock.The company said its software group, one of the world's largest makers of personal computer programs for consumers, could be sold in an initial public offering or to a third party. Two of its parts, Sierra On-Line Inc. and Davidson & Associates Inc., were acquired two years ago for $1.9 billion in stock.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 20, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday. Microsoft Corp. and other software publishers gained after reporting better-than-expected earnings, but the Dow Jones industrial average fell.The Nasdaq composite index climbed 2.40 to 1138.70 -- its 13th record this year and the third this week -- bringing this year's return to 8.23 percent, the best among major U.S. stock market )) averages. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 1.45 to 645.06. Microsoft is in both indexes.The Dow industrials sank 16.26 to 5,535.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | September 26, 1994
I get a lot of calls from frustrated people, but Betty was more frustrated than most.Her father had just given her his printer. She hooked it up to the parallel port of her PC, started up her word processor and tried to print out a report that was due in the morning. She got nothing but garbage, no matter what she tried, and she was getting desperate."What driver are you using?" I asked.Betty was not amused."I'm going crazy trying to print this thing and you're talking about golf," she snapped.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | April 18, 1994
One of the most frequent questions I get is, "Where can I find good software for my children?" Or grandchildren, as is often the case when grandma and grandpa give the family a personal computer as a present.There are plenty of fine programs on the shelves for children of all ages, and many of them don't involve kicking, punching or shooting anyone on screen. Some are strictly entertainment. Some are overtly educational, and many fall into a genre known )) as "edutainment," meaning that they're mostly fun but wind up teaching the kids something.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | September 13, 1993
When my oldest son was 5 or 6, I made a concerted effort to get him interested in educational software.I remember one particular "reading-is-fun" program that I thought was terrific. I dragged the lad down to my office, parked him in front of the screen and put him to work.Being a dutiful child (or at least semi-cooperative), Ike plugged away at it for 15 minutes, but he obviously wasn't enjoying it. Finally, he turned around and said, "Daddy, I do this all day at school. Do I have to do it at home, too?"
BUSINESS
By Jim McNair and Jim McNair,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 29, 1992
...TC Many new-wave criminals don't carry guns or smoke crack. More likely, they wear suits, work with computers and make purchasing decisions.They're software pirates, people who make copies of personal computer software programs, breaking federal copyright law. To the U.S. software industry, they are a $2.4 billion-a-year problem that is no longer a mere nuisance."
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | September 26, 1994
I get a lot of calls from frustrated people, but Betty was more frustrated than most.Her father had just given her his printer. She hooked it up to the parallel port of her PC, started up her word processor and tried to print out a report that was due in the morning. She got nothing but garbage, no matter what she tried, and she was getting desperate."What driver are you using?" I asked.Betty was not amused."I'm going crazy trying to print this thing and you're talking about golf," she snapped.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 16, 1992
If you're tired of breaking pencils and running out of ink on your calculator ribbon at tax time, consider the electronic alternative: tax preparation software for your personal computer.The programs aren't a substitute for professional tax advice, and, although most can churn out a 1040A or a 1040EZ form, the programs aren't going to save too much time for people with simple returns. Instead, they are for taxpayers with modestly complex returns who want to do the job themselves or want to take a first cut at it before visiting their accountant.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 11, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Business has never been better for producers of 3 1/2 -inch floppy disks, the pocket-size, hard-shell data repositories most personal computer owners use to get their new software into their machines.Business these days appears to be too good. Demand for the little plastic platters is so heavy that the world's manufacturers simply can't keep up with it. By some published estimates, the industry is producing about 52 million of the diskettes a month -- about 6 million to 8 million too few for current demand.
BUSINESS
By John Markoff and John Markoff,New York Times News Service n | March 24, 1992
An organization representing the nation's largest publishers of software for desktop computers is close to completing a confidential agreement with the National Security Agency to permit the sale abroad of programs that contain special data-security functions.Sales of software with the ability to encode information are now tightly controlled by the agency, a State Department unit that licenses the export of weapons.But U.S. software publishers have been putting pressure on the government to loosen controls on programs that contain such cryptographic features because they are hampering the ability of American companies to compete internationally.
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