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By Peter Cassidy and Peter Cassidy,Special to The Sun | August 26, 1991
Proposed legislation that would allow federal agencies to copyright some software has sparked a wide-ranging debate over the commercialization of government research.The bill, sponsored by Representative Constance A. Morella, R-Md.-8th, has enraged some software industry representatives. They see it as a perilous precedent that may promote public sector enterprise at the expense of private industry.Supporters of the bill, meanwhile, say copyright law must be revised to commercialize products and devices developed in government laboratories.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes , gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
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BUSINESS
By Lee Gomes and Lee Gomes,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 22, 1991
Scotts Valley, Calif. A few years ago, he was the zesty French teddy bear who peddled a couple of fast computer language programs and a nifty executive organizer -- and whose dreams of software grandeur were met with amusement and occasional condescension from the rest of the industry.No more. Today, Philippe Kahn, the 39-year-old founder, president and chairman of Borland International Inc. in Scotts Valley, is near the top of the industry's very short list of People Who Matter.With its purchase last week of Ashton-Tate Corp.
NEWS
By Avi Rubin | September 16, 2008
When it comes to voting technology, Maryland will soon take a big - and welcome - step backward. In 2004, the state switched almost all of its precincts to Diebold touch-screen voting equipment, called direct recording electronic machines (DREs). In 2006, Maryland adopted these devices for all precincts. But when we cast ballots for president this November, Maryland will use DREs for the last time in a statewide election. In 2010, we will return to a low-tech but far more secure system: optically scanned paper ballots.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 22, 2003
REDMOND, Wash. - Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates said yesterday that the software industry will deliver advances in limiting unwanted e-mail and security that make it worthwhile for companies to buy new computers and programs. Gates said that "over the next year, we will be able to turn the tide on spam," or unwanted e-mail, through a combination of legislation and improvements to network and personal computer software. "People are really underestimating what can be done," Gates told more than 100 chief executives at the headquarters of Microsoft, the world's biggest maker of software.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 14, 1991
The American software industry, tired of getting ripped off, is serving notice to users of illegal copies of personal computer programs: The next knock on your door could be the software cops.In the past year, the Software Publishers Association, a Washington group whose members include the biggest names in software, has dramatically stepped up raids of businesses suspected of using pirated software. The group now files an average of two lawsuits a week seeking federal permission to stage the raids, where SPA auditors accompanied by marshals search a company's disk drives for bootleg copies of 1-2-3, Norton Utilities and even MS-DOS.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Amanda J. Crawford and Michael Stroh and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2000
Forget the Microsoft trial for a moment. Close your eyes and imagine a world without the software giant and monopolist. No matter how you feel about the software company or its founder, Bill Gates, you'll have to acknowledge this: A world without Microsoft would be a different world indeed. Or would it? Experts say the U.S. economy, the software industry and the emerging realm of cyberspace bear the indelible imprint of Gates and his 30,000 employees. In Washington state, where Microsoft is based, the company's impact has been enormous, said Dick Conway, a Seattle-based economist.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | October 15, 1994
MENLO PARK, Calif. -- Microsoft Corp.'s planned buyout catapulted shares of Intuit Inc. by 34 percent yesterday, while Microsoft's stock fell 2.4 percent after analysts lowered earnings estimates for the personal computer software giant.L After the market closed Thursday, Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft and Menlo Park, Calif.-based Intuit announced the biggest purchase ever in the booming PC software industry. Microsoft will buy Intuit in a $1.5 billion stock transaction that places Microsoft in control of the growing market for software that helps people manage their finances.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes , gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
FEATURES
By Melissa Fletcher Stoeltje and Melissa Fletcher Stoeltje,Houston Chronicle | August 11, 1995
Next time you're at the video store, take a stroll down the computer- and video-game aisle and peruse those covers. If you suddenly feel overwhelmed by testosterone, it's not your imagination.The ratio of males to females pictured on the games' covers runs roughly 13-to-1.Studies show one-half of males on game covers are portrayed as dominating; one-third of females are portrayed submissively.Things don't get better beyond the cover: In the 47 top-selling video games of 1994, one-third of female characters are treated as victims.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,sun reporter | April 6, 2007
Educational software - which is used in most school districts across Maryland - appears to have no effect in improving student achievement although it can cost as much as $100 per child, a federally funded study has concluded. The results of the study, which was released this week by the U.S. Department of Education, is likely to prompt school districts, including Baltimore's, to look more closely at whether to purchase the software or invest in other strategies. The educational software industry is disputing the study's findings, saying they could have been skewed by poor training of teachers and other factors.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
In benefiting from No Child Left Behind, the education software industry can point to two factors: influence in Washington and plain old good timing. The industry -- a $2.3 billion-per-year concern, according to Eric Bassett of Eduventures, a Boston market research firm -- is well-connected in Washington. Its companies include several former high-ranking federal education officials on their boards and have given to both parties in recent years, including to George W. Bush when he ran for president.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
LOGAN, W. VA. - Earlier this year, two salespeople drove deep into the coal country of West Virginia on an improbable mission: selling expensive education software in one of the poorest corners of America. Logan County does not look like promising sales territory. Its mines have laid off thousands, methamphetamine labs abound, and every spring flooding creeks threaten impoverished hollows. But for Ron Dellinger and Samiha Lamerson, the two salespeople from Plato Learning Inc., the region's despair was not an obstacle.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | May 16, 2004
I'M A CONSERVATIVE investor who never liked technology stocks until I recently bought Microsoft Corp. shares. What are the expectations for this company? - M.M., via the Internet Shares of the world's largest software maker lately have benefited from rising sales of software for personal computers. John Connors, its chief financial officer, has said, "We are in the midst of a corporate recovery." The company is dominant in software for PC operating systems, with its Windows and Microsoft Office lines producing 65 percent of total revenue.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 22, 2003
REDMOND, Wash. - Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates said yesterday that the software industry will deliver advances in limiting unwanted e-mail and security that make it worthwhile for companies to buy new computers and programs. Gates said that "over the next year, we will be able to turn the tide on spam," or unwanted e-mail, through a combination of legislation and improvements to network and personal computer software. "People are really underestimating what can be done," Gates told more than 100 chief executives at the headquarters of Microsoft, the world's biggest maker of software.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Daniel Vasquez and Daniel Vasquez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 11, 2001
When police busted Anastacio Caneda in his San Jose home last year for duplicating CDs of expensive engineering and design computer programs and selling bootlegs on the Web, they also helped pioneer a new way to thwart software pirates - by going after the customers, too. In one of the first cases of its type - and according to the software industry, the largest and most successful - police and software company investigators tracked down dozens of...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2000
WASHINGTON - Microsoft Corp., saying it fears "grievous and irreparable harm" from the court order to break up the company and force changes in its business behavior, asked a federal judge yesterday to put "all provisions" of that decree on hold. In a brief motion, the software giant told U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson that the order could cause "radical changes in the software industry" and that he should not permit that to happen before the company had a chance to appeal the order.
NEWS
By Avi Rubin | September 16, 2008
When it comes to voting technology, Maryland will soon take a big - and welcome - step backward. In 2004, the state switched almost all of its precincts to Diebold touch-screen voting equipment, called direct recording electronic machines (DREs). In 2006, Maryland adopted these devices for all precincts. But when we cast ballots for president this November, Maryland will use DREs for the last time in a statewide election. In 2010, we will return to a low-tech but far more secure system: optically scanned paper ballots.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2000
Manugistics Group Inc., a Rockville company that makes software to help companies manage their supply chains, announced yesterday it is buying Talus Solutions Inc., which makes pricing and revenue optimization software, for $366 million in stock. It also announced earnings of 3 cents a share for the quarter ended Aug. 31, before special charges for repricing employee stock options. The earnings beat the estimates of analysts, who were expecting roughly a break-even quarter. Deirdre Blackwood, a spokeswoman for Manugistics, said the company is looking for some "cross-pollination" - selling its products to Talus customers and vice versa - but also toward producing a broader product that would appeal to new customers.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2000
WASHINGTON - Microsoft Corp., saying it fears "grievous and irreparable harm" from the court order to break up the company and force changes in its business behavior, asked a federal judge yesterday to put "all provisions" of that decree on hold. In a brief motion, the software giant told U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson that the order could cause "radical changes in the software industry" and that he should not permit that to happen before the company had a chance to appeal the order.
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