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NEWS
December 29, 2011
When are we going to learn that government can't procure custom-designed software the same way it procures plumbing supplies or paving stones? Reading of the suspension of Anne Arundel County's multimillion-dollar emergency dispatch system due to "software problems," I couldn't help but shake my head ("Anne Arundel suspends use of new emergency dispatch system," Dec. 23"). This was yet another example of a government bureaucracy that stubbornly insists that it can procure custom-designed software the same way it procures plumbing supplies or concrete for paving.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and four other prominent institutions will spend the next five years trying to turn a theoretical "next-generation" form of encryption into a practical way to better protect software from hackers. Hopkins, the University of California, Los Angeles, Stanford University, the University of Texas and Columbia University are forming the Center for Encrypted Functionalities through a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation. They are exploring a strategy known as obfuscation, which can hide the inner workings of programs from outsiders.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Deborah A. Rice, a former software designer and volunteer, died Monday of head and neck cancer at her Timonium home. She was 42. Deborah A. Budacz, the daughter of a steamship executive and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Towson High School in 1985, she earned a bachelor's degree in computer science from Loyola College. Mrs. Rice went to work for Century Computing, a Laurel software development company, as a member of a team that developed software for certain control systems used on the NASA space shuttles.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Stock in Columbia-based Micros Systems Inc. surged Tuesday after a report that it was about to be acquired by technology giant Oracle Corp. The company's shares shot up nearly 15 percent to close at $66.33 each in Tuesday trading after Bloomberg News reported that Oracle and Micros were in exclusive talks about the sale of the Maryland firm for more than $5 billion. The Bloomberg report cited anonymous sources "familiar with the matter," and neither company responded to requests for comment.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
Last year, Baltimore court officials sent a quarter-million summonses to potential jurors, culled from driver's license and voting records, knowing that only a fraction — about 27 percent — of those called would show up. The city has tried offering restaurant coupons, parking discounts and a "Juror Appreciation Week" to bring in more people over the years — threatening some of the worst truants with jail time — but the efforts have largely...
BUSINESS
By Lawrence J. Magid and Lawrence J. Magid,Los Angeles Times | April 20, 1992
The computer industry has a knack for creating big solutions to big problems. But what about the little problems, like printing addresses on envelopes?It seems that most offices I visit, no matter how computerized, have at least one typewriter around for typing on envelopes. Traditional PC printers and software make the job too cumbersome, but there are some solutions.Most laser printers, for example, have a tray where you can feed in envelopes and other odd-sized documents. However, your word processing program may not have any idea where to put the information.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Tenable Network Security Inc., an information security software developer based in Columbia, said Wednesday that it had received $50 million in funding from the venture capital firm Accel Partners. The round of funding, the first in Tenable's 10-year history, will allow the firm to expand offerings, accelerate growth and enhance its research into evolving threats, the company said. Tenable recently doubled its number of workers to 200 and said it expected to hire another 200 employees over the next two years.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 6, 2010
Chris Ashworth had studied computer science but never written an entire piece of software when a North Carolina theater production company asked for his help. What he came up with would be a huge hit with creative professionals who design elaborate stage productions across the world. The theater company needed software that could help manage sound effects for a play while running on an Apple computer. Ashworth was a computer science graduate student in North Carolina, and he and a friend built one for them in a little over a month.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1998
Intersolv Inc., a Rockville-based software development firm, said yesterday that it has acquired SQL Software Ltd.Intersolv took over SQL in return for approximately 1.3 million shares of Intersolv common stock. The deal was valued at about $20 million.Intersolv, which was founded in 1982, helps companies develop specialized software.SQL, based in Hertford, England, crafts customized software assembly processes."It's an area we were not involved in, and the market's really young," said Intersolv President and Chief Executive Officer Gary Greenfield.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES DUHIGG and CHARLES DUHIGG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 22, 2005
A California-based digital-rights group and the Texas attorney general sued Sony BMG Music Entertainment yesterday for selling compact discs with anti-piracy software that allegedly leaves computers vulnerable to hackers and viruses. The cases highlight the narrow line walked by the recording industry as it seeks ways to deter bootleggers. To be effective, copy-protection systems must be tough to crack. But software that's too intrusive risks alienating music buyers - as Sony BMG's so-called XCP technology has done.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Jenny Morgan headed a health care IT company for years before jumping to private equity, but she realized her passion wasn't investing in firms — it was being in the trenches, running one. So when the founder of Linthicum-based basys wanted to bring in a new CEO, she happily took the job in 2009. The timing — during the rough recession — wasn't ideal. But she says the benefits-administration software company made good use of the downtime and positioned itself for growth. Basys, which employs nearly 100 people, focuses on a very specific niche: helping "Taft-Hartley" funds, entities that manage union members' benefits, with their administration.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, Meredith Cohn and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
The board overseeing Maryland's health exchange voted unanimously Tuesday evening to scrap its dysfunctional website and adopt software developed by Deloitte Consulting and used by the more successful health exchange in Connecticut. The software is free for Maryland to use but Health Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein will negotiate an emergency $40 million to $50 million contract with the software company to develop the site. Isabel FitzGerald, secretary of the state's Department of Information Technology, who stepped in to help fix the exchange, will oversee the project.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Weeks after officials at the state's health care exchange began blaming IBM software for the worst problems, including lost applications, IBM began pushing back, saying the state shares some of the blame. It's the latest salvo in the blame game that has been going on since the exchange launched, and crashed, on Oct. 1. In this case, IBM officials released a statement Wednesday that said the exchange also bears some responsibility for the website, which is still so troubled that officials are considering dumping it. IBM was brought in by Noridian Healthcare Solutions, the company that had been in charge of setting up and managing the exchange website until the exchange terminated it last month.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Tax giant KPMG LLP has acquired Cynergy Systems Inc., a Baltimore-based company that builds and designs software and mobile applications, for an undisclosed sum. Through the acquisition, KPMG sought to add more services for companies looking to use software systems to improve efficiency, productivity or sales, said Stephen Chase, a principal with KPMG. Cynergy builds and designs systems used in industries including health care, telecommunications, financial services and video games, and provides training to companies on how to use them.
NEWS
February 23, 2014
At last week's Board of Public Works meeting, Comptroller Peter Franchot asked a series of pointed questions about the process by which the state selected the vendors who built Maryland's flawed health insurance exchange website. In particular, he suggested that the state was ill served by legislation that exempted the health exchange's procurement from review by the Board of Public Works. "There's a damn good reason this board has stood the test of time since the Constitutional Convention of 1864," he said.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
As a retired systems engineer with over 20 years of in development of software systems, I have to question why it is necessary that each state develop its own software for the health insurance exchanges. There are 26 states that have their own health care exchanges. Some work better than others, but each essentially does the same things. They screen people for applicability, screen for Medicaid qualifications, provide the present choices for insurance plans and offer a sign-up procedure.
BUSINESS
By Marianne Amoss, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Military veterans make up nearly half of the staff at the Columbia software development company IntelliGenesis. Their experience in a variety of war zones and training areas all over the world is invaluable to the company, which provides artificial intelligence, computer network operations and intelligence analysis to federal government clients working on national security missions. “We bring that worldly knowledge to these missions,” said Angie Lienert, its president and CEO. “We understand firsthand the value of the work we conduct.” A veteran herself - she was an Arabic linguist in the Air Force for six years - Lienert has led the company since its founding in 2007.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Technical problems continued to frustrate people attempting to access the new state health insurance exchange on Friday The issues with marylandhealthconnection.gov, the online exchange set up under national health reform, prompted some analysts to suggest that the system's software and servers aren't robust enough. "They seem to be building this system on the go," said Robert Laszewski, a Washington-based insurance industry consultant. "It was not adequately tested, and it was not ready for prime time.
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