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Soft Shoes

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NEWS
April 21, 1992
There was only one "Soft Shoes." That was Harry J. McGuirk's nickname in the State House and at City Hall, the two focal points of political power that he frequented -- and frequently influenced -- during his 32 years in government. He was the consummate political insider and deal-maker, whose modus +V operandi was so smooth yet complex that he resembled Fred Astaire on the dance floor. South Baltimore's own "Soft Shoes."No Maryland politician was more respected for his mastery of the legislative system and the uses of power than Mr. McGuirk, who died yesterday at age 68. He had not been a legislator for 10 years yet everyone still called him "senator" in his job as executive assistant to Gov. William Donald Schaefer.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The newest candidate for the House of Delegates in a district that includes parts of Baltimore and Howard counties has some big -- and soft -- shoes to fill. Renee McGuirk-Spence announced Tuesday that she has filed to run as a Democrat for one of three open House seats in the 12th District. A longtime aide to former Maryland school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, McGuirk-Spence is the daughter of the late state Sen. Harry J. McGuirk, a colorful character known in Maryland politics as "Soft Shoes" for the deftness of his legislative maneuvering.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The newest candidate for the House of Delegates in a district that includes parts of Baltimore and Howard counties has some big -- and soft -- shoes to fill. Renee McGuirk-Spence announced Tuesday that she has filed to run as a Democrat for one of three open House seats in the 12th District. A longtime aide to former Maryland school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, McGuirk-Spence is the daughter of the late state Sen. Harry J. McGuirk, a colorful character known in Maryland politics as "Soft Shoes" for the deftness of his legislative maneuvering.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 26, 1992
Havre de Grace. -- One of the frustrations of writing a weekly newspaper column is that no matter how fast you work, the ideas pour in even faster.Every selection of a subject means other almost-as-tempting topics must be rejected. And once they are passed over they are usually lost forever, buried under the avalanche of new material brought by the news, the mail and first-hand observation. So in the interest of intellectual-resource conservation, herewith three mini-columns on matters which deserved fuller treatment but never got it.I.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | April 25, 1992
Friends, family and a throng of public officials past an present gathered yesterday in a modest but beautiful church in Southwest Baltimore to send Harry J. McGuirk on his way."We lost our best friend, our adviser, our confidante," said his son, Bryant McGuirk. "He left behind a very large pair of soft shoes that will never be filled."Known as "Soft Shoes" for his unobtrusive but effective political deal-making, Mr. McGuirk died Monday after suffering a heart attack in a Baltimore parking garage.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 21, 1992
Harry McGuirk used to deny the origin of his famous nickname, Soft Shoes, but he never denied it very loudly.The name implied a guy who left no tracks, who could sneak around the political back rooms and rearrange things while nobody was looking, and then slip away without leaving the traces of the amateur.Part of him reveled in the name: in politics, power is mostly perceptions, so why not feed the idea that he had connections beyond the imaginings of most rubes? But he knew, too, that the image limited him. Senator Soft Shoes was one thing, but Governor Soft Shoes?
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | March 10, 1992
Q: Any thoughts about hard vs. soft shoes for a 1-year old? The shoe salesman says kids need support until age 2 but I thought I'd read that pediatricians recommend flexible shoes.A: We are asked this question frequently! It's a myth that "sturdy shoes" with hard soles and high tops are better for your child's feet; they are only more expensive. They will not help your child learn to walk sooner or better. You will need to replace your child's shoes every two to three months, because feet grow rapidly at this age; so price is an important consideration.
NEWS
By William Hughes | April 24, 1992
IT WAS ONE of those awful humid summer nights in Baltimore, nearly 37 years ago. We were all sitting around the Locust Point Democratic Club, dressed down to the basic essentials to escape the beastly elements, playing a little poker, drinking some warm draft beer, cursing the fates and puffing on our cigarettes.The club was so close to the harbor you could hear the longshoremen loading the steel pipes on the Alcoa ship at Pier 9. I was 18 years old and working on the waterfront as a stevedore/checker out of ILA Locals 829 and 1429.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 26, 1992
Havre de Grace. -- One of the frustrations of writing a weekly newspaper column is that no matter how fast you work, the ideas pour in even faster.Every selection of a subject means other almost-as-tempting topics must be rejected. And once they are passed over they are usually lost forever, buried under the avalanche of new material brought by the news, the mail and first-hand observation. So in the interest of intellectual-resource conservation, herewith three mini-columns on matters which deserved fuller treatment but never got it.I.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
The Waterfront Kitchen launches a summer Dinner and a Cruise series. The evenings, hosted by the Waterfront Kitchen's wine expert, Jerry Pellegrino, begin with cocktails on the pier next to the restaurant. Guests will then board either the 104-foot pungy schooner Lady Maryland or the 50-foot skipjack Sigsbee for a ninety minute guided cruise down the Patapsco toward the Chesapeake. After the cruise, guests will sit down for a themed, four-course dinner at the restaurant. Here's the schedule.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | April 25, 1992
Friends, family and a throng of public officials past an present gathered yesterday in a modest but beautiful church in Southwest Baltimore to send Harry J. McGuirk on his way."We lost our best friend, our adviser, our confidante," said his son, Bryant McGuirk. "He left behind a very large pair of soft shoes that will never be filled."Known as "Soft Shoes" for his unobtrusive but effective political deal-making, Mr. McGuirk died Monday after suffering a heart attack in a Baltimore parking garage.
NEWS
By William Hughes | April 24, 1992
IT WAS ONE of those awful humid summer nights in Baltimore, nearly 37 years ago. We were all sitting around the Locust Point Democratic Club, dressed down to the basic essentials to escape the beastly elements, playing a little poker, drinking some warm draft beer, cursing the fates and puffing on our cigarettes.The club was so close to the harbor you could hear the longshoremen loading the steel pipes on the Alcoa ship at Pier 9. I was 18 years old and working on the waterfront as a stevedore/checker out of ILA Locals 829 and 1429.
NEWS
April 21, 1992
There was only one "Soft Shoes." That was Harry J. McGuirk's nickname in the State House and at City Hall, the two focal points of political power that he frequented -- and frequently influenced -- during his 32 years in government. He was the consummate political insider and deal-maker, whose modus +V operandi was so smooth yet complex that he resembled Fred Astaire on the dance floor. South Baltimore's own "Soft Shoes."No Maryland politician was more respected for his mastery of the legislative system and the uses of power than Mr. McGuirk, who died yesterday at age 68. He had not been a legislator for 10 years yet everyone still called him "senator" in his job as executive assistant to Gov. William Donald Schaefer.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 21, 1992
Harry McGuirk used to deny the origin of his famous nickname, Soft Shoes, but he never denied it very loudly.The name implied a guy who left no tracks, who could sneak around the political back rooms and rearrange things while nobody was looking, and then slip away without leaving the traces of the amateur.Part of him reveled in the name: in politics, power is mostly perceptions, so why not feed the idea that he had connections beyond the imaginings of most rubes? But he knew, too, that the image limited him. Senator Soft Shoes was one thing, but Governor Soft Shoes?
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | March 10, 1992
Q: Any thoughts about hard vs. soft shoes for a 1-year old? The shoe salesman says kids need support until age 2 but I thought I'd read that pediatricians recommend flexible shoes.A: We are asked this question frequently! It's a myth that "sturdy shoes" with hard soles and high tops are better for your child's feet; they are only more expensive. They will not help your child learn to walk sooner or better. You will need to replace your child's shoes every two to three months, because feet grow rapidly at this age; so price is an important consideration.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2005
Adamp, gray chill hangs in the air, the Stonewall sign is broken and sagging and a For Sale sign flaps against the Formstone building at 1212 S. Charles St. as state Sen. George W. Della Jr. pushes the door open and steps into a political twilight zone. The Stonewall Democratic Club - a last survivor from Baltimore's rich tradition of neighborhood political clubs - is holding an open house from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. today for people interested in buying the clubhouse that has been its headquarters for more than 75 years.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1998
Irish dancer Katie Fox understands a performer must pay as much attention to her dress as her steps.Fox, a Loch Raven High School sophomore and honors student from Towson, has learned to abide by the judge's criteria, which can be as unforgiving as an Olympic skating judge's. Luckily, in the rest of her life this ardent athlete, actress and fiddle player can throw on a pair of jeans and a T-shirt and feel right at home.Since she was 7, Katie Fox has been a student of the Broesler School of Irish Dance.
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