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Soft On Crime

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By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | October 28, 1994
Is Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.-- a respected, conservative eight-year veteran of the General Assembly -- a criminal-coddling friend of murderers?Democrat Gerry L. Brewster, the Towson delegate and former prosecutor running for Congress in Maryland's 2nd District against Mr. Ehrlich, wants voters to think so.Mr. Brewster has launched attacks on his Republican opponent aimed at persuading voters that Mr. Ehrlich is soft on crime -- even though the two men were named "Co-Legislator of the Year" by the state Fraternal Order of Police this year.
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NEWS
May 1, 2013
Regarding Dan Rodricks ' commentary on drugs at the city detention center, don't opinion columnists belong on the op-ed page, not in the news section ("Scandal at jail another symptom of war on drugs," April 27)? Mr. Rodricks blames a large share of crime and corruption on the drug war, and he advocates for decriminalizing or legalizing marijuana, cocaine and heroin. That would lead to a world of addicted people roaming the streets and driving cars in a drug-induced haze, with no motivation to work or be productive members of their families or of society.
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Trying to capitalize on one of the hot issues of the fall campaign, Republican U.S. Senate challenger Bill Brock has gone on television with a commercial implying that incumbent Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes is soft on crime.The advertisement states that Mr. Sarbanes voted to strike death penalty provisions from the recent crime bill and opposed mandatory sentences for crimes involving a gun and for selling drugs to children."Now he tells us he's tough on crime," the narrator says. "The more you hear about Senator Sarbanes, the more he sounds like part of the problem."
NEWS
August 18, 2010
The Monday morning quarterbacks have been criticizing Judge John Addison Howard incessantly for being overly lenient and failing to jail John Wagner for violating his probation ("Plea deal puts robber back on street," Aug. 8). Mr. Wagner has subsequently been charged with the death of Stephen Pitcairn. While I can not discuss the specifics of the Wagner case, as the lawyer who supervises the Violation of Probation Unit of the Office of the Public Defender for Baltimore City, I can speak to what kind of jurist Judge Howard is when it comes to the people he places on probation.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
Maryland spends more than $1 billion a year on locking up criminals, and what do we get for it? Prisons overflowing with low-level drug offenders who keep the revolving door spinning as they continue to commit minor crimes to support their habits. It doesn't have to be this way. That's why Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear recently signed a law sending hundreds of nonviolent drug offenders to treatment instead of prison. The Bluegrass State expects to cut the $20,000-a-year cost of housing a prison inmate in half by incarcerating minor felons in county jails.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | November 2, 1994
A former Navy seaman's lawyers have charged in pretrial motions that State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee is seeking the death penalty against their client because of election-year pressures.Darris Ware, 23, of no fixed address, has been charged with two counts of first-degree murder in the Dec. 30, 1993, slayings of his fiancee, Betina Gentry, 18, and her neighbor, Cynthia Vega-Allen, 22. They were found shot to death in Ms. Gentry's Severn home.Prosecutors told Mr. Ware on March 22 that they would seek the death penalty.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | April 11, 1994
Am I soft on crime? Quite a few readers have been on the phone saying so. They're upset because I oppose the vicious lashing of the young American in Singapore who took part in a wave of vandalism.The answer is that most of the time, no, I'm not soft on crime. I have no problem with the death penalty for killers proved guilty beyond doubt. I believe chronic sex offenders should be locked up for life. Any crime against children, throw away the key.But I suppose there have been times when I might be guilty of being a bit soft.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | December 5, 2005
ATLANTA -- When Bill Clinton was running for president in January 1992, he left the campaign trail to fly back to Arkansas for the execution of Rickey Ray Rector, convicted of killing two people, including a police officer, in 1981. Mr. Clinton's trip back home was a deliberate tactic designed to prove that he was no criminal-coddling liberal but, instead, a hard-nosed Democrat who knew how to deal with vicious predators. That was then. On Tuesday, lame-duck Virginia Gov. Mark Warner, mentioned as a possible Democratic candidate for president, commuted the death sentence of Robin Lovitt, convicted of the murder of a pool hall night manager in 1998.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
Charging that new sentencing guidelines are too lenient, a group of Maryland prosecutors will ask judges not to use the guidelines until the issue is aired at public hearings."
NEWS
May 1, 1997
'Ellen' will be breaking ground for TV familiesIn his April 27 column, "Ellen breaks with the past,'' TV critic David Zurawik writes that the character of Ellen Morgan coming out on television is important because, "It is the test case for moving gays and lesbians to full membership in our television families."
NEWS
April 6, 2009
Maryland spends more than $1 billion a year on locking up criminals, and what do we get for it? Prisons overflowing with low-level drug offenders who keep the revolving door spinning as they continue to commit minor crimes to support their habits. It doesn't have to be this way. That's why Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear recently signed a law sending hundreds of nonviolent drug offenders to treatment instead of prison. The Bluegrass State expects to cut the $20,000-a-year cost of housing a prison inmate in half by incarcerating minor felons in county jails.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2008
WASHINGTON - On a Web site he calls ExposeObama.com, Floyd G. Brown, the producer of the "Willie Horton" ad that helped to defeat Michael Dukakis in 1988, is preparing an encore. Brown is raising money for a series of ads that he says will show Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois to be out of touch on an issue of fundamental concern to voters: violent crime. One spot already on the Internet attacks the presumptive Democratic nominee for opposing a bill while he was an Illinois legislator that would have extended the death penalty to gang-related murders.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | October 22, 2006
We turn now to the new TV drama Law and Order: Political Intent. Note to viewers: We've had a role reversal, a switching - not of cops and robbers, but of Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives. In this year's race for governor, the leading law-and-order candidate turns out to be the Democrat, Mayor Martin O'Malley. He charges his Republican opponent, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., with releasing a stream of dangerous criminals from prison. Excuse me? This is the Republican who's being accused of being soft on crime by the Democrat?
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | December 5, 2005
ATLANTA -- When Bill Clinton was running for president in January 1992, he left the campaign trail to fly back to Arkansas for the execution of Rickey Ray Rector, convicted of killing two people, including a police officer, in 1981. Mr. Clinton's trip back home was a deliberate tactic designed to prove that he was no criminal-coddling liberal but, instead, a hard-nosed Democrat who knew how to deal with vicious predators. That was then. On Tuesday, lame-duck Virginia Gov. Mark Warner, mentioned as a possible Democratic candidate for president, commuted the death sentence of Robin Lovitt, convicted of the murder of a pool hall night manager in 1998.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | July 16, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas - Well, President Bush made his big speech on corporate reform July 9 and the stock market went down by 178 points. As predicted, Mr. Bush proposed stiffer penalties for bad apples, evildoers and perpetrators of "malfee-ance." Unfortunately, that won't fix the system. Much as one would like to see many corporate executives doing time alongside hard-working stick-up artists, that leaves the systemic problems in place. Among the leading structural factors causing the cascading scandals are conflict of interest on the part of auditors who also get paid by their clients as consultants, conflict of interest on the part of stock analysts and their investment-banker bosses, abuse of stock options encouraged by not having to count their cost against earnings, and lack of oversight on accountants and insider loans - of the very kind Mr. Bush himself got at Harken.
NEWS
May 1, 1997
'Ellen' will be breaking ground for TV familiesIn his April 27 column, "Ellen breaks with the past,'' TV critic David Zurawik writes that the character of Ellen Morgan coming out on television is important because, "It is the test case for moving gays and lesbians to full membership in our television families."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Better late than never, President Clinton is now trying to tap into an issue threatening to dominate political debate through the rest of the 1993 campaign and into 1994 -- crime in the streets.The political volatility of the crime issue is abundantly clear in major city mayoral election campaigns and in the two contests for governor this year in New Jersey and Virginia.Gov. Jim Florio, the embattled Democrat seeking a second term in New Jersey, has used his demand for gun control to broaden his appeal to more liberal voters who still may not have forgiven him for the huge tax program he promulgated his first year in office.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | August 25, 1994
PICK YOUR poison, crime or the budget deficit. Every candidate for governor has an answer but no one has a solution.Anyone who hasn't been vacationing in a bat cave knows the state is facing a $900 million structural deficit over the next four years.And for those who follow the stats, crime is rampaging like a menacing plague, so much so that three strikes and you're out is no longer the old ball game. For symbol-minded candidates it's two times, Charlie, and throw away the key. Much of the rhetoric doesn't have a point.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 20, 1997
Thank you, Leon Yukem Noel. Thank you. Sometimes the most eloquent argument for a particular belief comes from the most unexpected places. And this past Wednesday, Noel gave a chilling example of why violent criminals with a history of violence should be tossed behind bars and the doors welded shut.If you didn't get to read Sun reporter Brenda Buote's article in the April 17 issue about Noel's exhilarating performance in front of Judge John Carroll Byrnes, I will inform you. First, let's be clear who Noel is, so that we don't overlook the most important people in this matter: the family and loved ones of the woman he was convicted of murdering for 52 cents.
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