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EXPLORE
April 8, 2013
As a Foreign Service family who lived for six years in Central America, where no soda was allowed on our children's school campus, we were very surprised to discover that the highly rated Howard County schools still sell soda in vending machines. Soft drinks contribute nothing nutritionally, but can do a lot of damage to our children's health. Yet, schools selling soft drinks send a clear message that these are okay to consume. As a parent who discourages my children from drinking soft drinks, having a soda machine at school undermines my efforts as well, making our jobs as parents that much harder.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 22, 2013
Happiness doesn't come in a red can. Obesity does. That's the tag line from a commercial that will begin airing soon in the Baltimore area, and it's a not-so-subtle attack on Coca-Cola mounted by a group of local health advocates including Howard County's Horizon Foundation, the Maryland State Medical Society (MedChi), the American Heart Association and People Acting Together in Howard (PATH). The ad is a parody of a Coke campaign that features people handing out bottles of cola to strangers around the world in an uplifting, music-filled celebration.
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BUSINESS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1995
A national beverage company that has gotten a lot of flak over its flasks has agreed to stop marketing soft drinks in containers that resemble bottles of cheap wine.Everfresh Beverages Inc. of Chicago said it will phase out the flask in a few months when it finds another unique design for its six new soft drinks.Six weeks ago, the company began selling the new drinks in rectangular containers that resemble flasks of hard liquor or low-end wines such as MD 20/20.But the marketing plan angered people in Maryland, including Baltimore City Councilwoman Agnes B. Welch of the 4th District.
EXPLORE
April 8, 2013
As a Foreign Service family who lived for six years in Central America, where no soda was allowed on our children's school campus, we were very surprised to discover that the highly rated Howard County schools still sell soda in vending machines. Soft drinks contribute nothing nutritionally, but can do a lot of damage to our children's health. Yet, schools selling soft drinks send a clear message that these are okay to consume. As a parent who discourages my children from drinking soft drinks, having a soda machine at school undermines my efforts as well, making our jobs as parents that much harder.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2007
Dr. Ramachandran Vasan and colleagues pored over the health records of thousands of patients and deduced this: People of middle age who drank as little as one soda a day - diet or regular - had at least a 40 percent greater chance of developing risk factors for heart disease than abstainers. Vasan had expected a link between heart health risk and sugar-sweetened, high-calorie drinks. But the diet soda findings puzzled him. So the researchers called for more study when they published their findings yesterday in Circulation, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.
BUSINESS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | December 28, 1990
The death of Baltimore County's much maligned beverage-container tax next week will be marked by higher -- not lower -- prices for beer, soft drinks and liquor because of industry price increases and new federal taxes.Although the end of the container tax will knock 12 cents off the cost of a six-pack of beer or soda in Baltimore County, prices for those items are expected to increase about 25 cents per six pack for beer and perhaps a few pennies for soda, according to store owners.On Jan. 1, the federal excise taxes will double on beer -- from 16 cents to 32 cents -- per six-pack and will triple on a 750 milliliter bottle of table wine -- from 3 cents to 21 cents.
FEATURES
By Steven Pratt and Steven Pratt,Chicago Tribune | November 28, 1990
CHICAGO -- If you aren't into automatic bottling machines, computerized vending or streamlined soft-drink delivery systems, there was not a lot to see at the annual International Beverage Industry Exhibition and Congress held recently in McCormick Place.There was, however, a whole lot to drink, especially if you are partial to fruit juices, soda pop, sports beverages, premixed teas or spring fresh bottled waters.That, of course, was the purpose of InterBev 90, which drew 15,000 retailers and wholesalers and more than 400 exhibitors from 86 countries to see what's happening in the wide world of soft drinks.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- They warned you about Chinese food, oil-soaked movie popcorn and cinnamon buns. They said no to chimichangas and called fettuccine Alfredo a "heart attack on a plate."Now, the nation's food police have taken on a new scourge: Soft drinks.Today's kids are drinking too much of the stuff -- and not drinking the things they should, such as milk, water and fruit juice, said Michael F. Jacobson, director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a Washington watchdog group.
NEWS
By Halimah Abdullah and Halimah Abdullah,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | April 10, 1999
DALLAS -- Afternoon sun sets the altar of soda bottles aglow. The red, blue and purple concoctions, stacked three shelves high in the front window, dance in the light. D.O.A., a lemon-orange drink flavored with jalapenos, promises to be a hit. Afri Cola and Shirakiku suggest faraway climes. Outside, customers stare for a moment, pressing palms against the window; then they step inside. The sodas lure them indoors. Hamilton Rousseau keeps them there. "This is kind of a laboratory for me," the shop owner says.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | October 14, 2005
Does drinking carbonated beverages harm the bones or teeth? The carbonation per se isn't bad. But fizzy soft drinks can give you gas and heartburn, while the sugar in nondiet drinks adds useless calories and can give you cavities. You'd be better off drinking a glass or two of bone-enhancing low-fat milk instead. Scientists have wondered whether the phosphoric acid in many soft drinks might damage bones. But they've looked and found that "there really isn't any evidence that carbonated beverages affect bone health," according Dr. Michael Holick, professor of medicine, physiology and biophysics at Boston University Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | September 28, 2012
Like many sitcoms, "Parks and Recreation" can be broken down by its at-times separate, at-times interweaving storylines. TV Lust's Amy Watts breaks down the plots: In the A plot: Leslie has proposed a tax on soft drinks to deal with Pawnee's obesity epidemic. (Nevermind that most of the Pawnee folks we see regularly on this show are trim. Must be a fluke.) Unsurprisingly, Ron is against such a tax. Leslie has many arguments with the Pawnee Restaurant Association representative about the labeling of the sizes, the labeling of "Zero Water" and her threat of layoffs if the tax is passed.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | September 5, 2012
Regal Entertainment Group will open a 12-screen and IMAX movie theater this month at Waugh Chapel  Towne Centre in Gambrills, with preview events starting Monday and a Sept. 14 grand opening. The 2,200-seat Waugh Chapel Stadium 12 & IMAX will join anchors Target and Dick's Sporting Goods, which opened this year at the $275 million mixed-use project in western Anne Arundel County - the nation's largest retail project currently under construction. Wegmans is coming to the center, next to the Village at Waugh Chapel, this fall.
EXPLORE
February 10, 2012
Editor: All right, this is it. I have truly had enough. I cannot figure out how anyone in their right mind would think that a gasoline tax would be beneficial in any way to Marylanders. The poor and downtrodden already are having a difficult time finding and maintaining a job. How is making the "getting to it more difficult" going to help anyone? Should Marylanders sacrifice food and/or shelter so that they can get to work, only to come home to a box because they can't now pay rent or a mortgage?
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
Ocean City is sending Pepsi packing. Come spring, Coca-Cola will be the official soft drink of the Maryland resort town. Officials entered into a five-year exclusive agreement with the beverage company, guaranteeing that only Coke products will be served at town-owned properties and town-operated events. Obviously, you can still purchase Pepsi in Ocean City, but you won't be able to get it at some of the city's signature events, like SunFest.  As part of the contract, which takes effect April 2, Ocean City receives a $65,000 cash payment, commission on product sales, advertising and marketing support and, of course, free soft drinks. The contract also designates Coca-Cola as the "official soft drink of Ocean City.
EXPLORE
October 31, 2011
In an effort focused on grabbing headlines, County Executive Ken Ulman recently called for a 30-day boycott of soft drinks, completely missing an opportunity to educate and talk to the public about real solutions for addressing obesity. Now more than ever the commitment of Maryland's beverage industry to do our part is shining through. Our member companies are cutting the calories available from beverages in the marketplace. In fact, the total amount of beverage calories available in the marketplace decreased by 21 percent from 1998 to 2008.
NEWS
September 1, 2011
Perhaps it comes from an excess of caffeine and corn syrup, but the beverage industry and its retail allies always seem to be fired up about one thing or another. The latest example is their crusade to repeal Baltimore's controversial bottle tax that was approved just last year and was instrumental in helping the city avoid a huge budget shortfall. Under legislation sponsored by Councilwoman Belinda K. Conaway, the 2-cent tax on beverage containers approved in 2010 would sunset in 2012 instead of 2013.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It may be true, as the advertising slogan says, that things go better with Coke. But school lunch is not one of them, the chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee said yesterday.The chairman, Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, D-Vt., has introduced a bill that would encourage schools to restrict or ban the sale of soft drinks and other items of "minimal nutritional value."The Coca-Cola Co. is lobbying against the proposal. It has organized a letter-writing campaign by school principals, superintendents and coaches, who fear they will lose some of the money they get from vending machines.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | November 1, 2001
Baltimore City Northeastern District Shooting: An unidentified man was shot in the 3000 block of Echodale Ave. about 8 p.m. yesterday and was taken by ambulance to Johns Hopkins Hospital. His condition was not known. Two men, one wearing a werewolf Halloween mask, were being sought. Northern District Theft from vehicle: A cellular phone, cash and credit cards were stolen Tuesday from a Chevrolet Blazer parked in the 2400 block of Cylburn Ave. Robbery: An 85-year-old woman was walking in the 4000 block of Seven Mile Lane about 6 p.m. Tuesday when a man struck her in the face and stole her purse containing cash and property - all valued at $45. The woman was treated at Sinai Hospital and released.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | May 26, 2011
There's probably a reason why you don't see many commentaries on restaurants that specialize in buffets. Sheer numbers of dishes prevent a truly thorough tasting of all that some buffets provide. Multiple visits and multiple meal expenses and multiple pages of copy still might not do the job. On the other hand, certain buffet eateries deserve their 15 minutes of fame. Among them is Chen Hibachi Buffet in the Golden Triangle Center, Ellicott City. This pleasantly appointed restaurant where Panda Buffet used to be is actually a second edition of that restaurant.
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