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By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 21, 2003
I don't take `no' easily," says director Sofia Coppola, stopping mid-conversation in a Japanese restaurant. "I just keep asking until someone says `yes.' It's good for directing, but in real life it can be obnoxious." Real life, in this case, is finding someone to bring her a ginger ale. The first time this petite, whispery-voiced director asked for a refreshment, she stopped a restaurant staffer who didn't speak English very well. But no matter. While in Tokyo filming her sophomore effort Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Ghost World's Scarlett Johansson, Coppola worked with a crew that mostly didn't speak English.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 20, 2006
If a high-end patisserie ever went "all you can eat," the result would be something like Marie Antoinette, an endless gourmet pastry tray of a movie put together by a gifted young bakery chef, writer-director Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation). It's high-caloric art-house moviemaking, full of pastry-coated, sugar-swirled ideas and historical moments dipped in candy. They are consumed entirely in the watching of the movie. They leave no aftertaste - no troubling thought, no haunting emotion, except, perhaps, a smile and a tear for Kirsten Dunst's cheerful valor in the title role.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 12, 2000
Some films succeed by creating exciting, exotic worlds that filmgoers could never visit. Others introduce audiences to characters they will never forget. Then there are those rare movies that entrance us by the emotional tone they capture and sustain. This is the rarefied air in which "The Virgin Suicides" makes its considerable impact. This dreamy tone-poem to the longing and frustration of adolescence doesn't unfold as much as materialize, ethereally, on screen, and it hovers in the imagination long after the lights have gone up. This is not to suggest that Sofia Coppola, who makes her feature directorial debut here, hasn't created some unforgettable characters or, for that matter, failed to orchestrate a gripping story.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PHILLIPS and MICHAEL PHILLIPS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 15, 2006
Opening Wednesday, the 59th Festival de Cannes unfurls its red carpet just in time for a planned municipal police strike. It won't be the first strike scheduled around festival time in the French Riviera town famous for being famous, and for being beautiful, and for treating the motion picture arts and sciences like cultural gold. But if the cops walk, will anyone notice? The Cannes film festival - the premier show business pileup of art, commerce, cleavage and Brad Pitt stubble - promises its customary blend of Hollywood and international cinema.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 20, 2006
If a high-end patisserie ever went "all you can eat," the result would be something like Marie Antoinette, an endless gourmet pastry tray of a movie put together by a gifted young bakery chef, writer-director Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation). It's high-caloric art-house moviemaking, full of pastry-coated, sugar-swirled ideas and historical moments dipped in candy. They are consumed entirely in the watching of the movie. They leave no aftertaste - no troubling thought, no haunting emotion, except, perhaps, a smile and a tear for Kirsten Dunst's cheerful valor in the title role.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 2004
Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation is really a throwback to the French New Wave -- two actors of immense charm, a confined setting and no plot as such, just a situation. If it had been made in 1963 instead of 2003, it would have starred Jean-Paul Belmondo and Anouk Aimee. It has an airy lightness to it in spite of the fact that it's about two people deeply alienated from their own lives. Truffaut would have loved it. The film stays afloat largely because of the undertow of a teasing sense of sexual tension.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
A tale of strangers igniting sparks in a strange land, Lost in Translation amounts to beautiful frustration. The talented young writer-director Sofia Coppola (The Virgin Suicides) conceives her second picture as a Tokyo-set duet between Scarlett Johansson as a neglected newlywed and Bill Murray as an over-the-hill movie star with a moribund marriage back home. But this movie registers like a pop song that enters the mind only in fragments because, as a whole, it lacks the style or substance to be memorable.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 28, 2004
You love the movies, but have no time for the theater? You crave the trailblazing films of the independent cinema, but none of the local multiplexes shows them? You'd keep up with the latest Hollywood has to offer - if you could do so from the comfort of your sofa? Larry Meistrich is offering a solution. For $19.95 a month, the Manhattan-based entrepreneur and former producer (You Can Count On Me, Sling Blade) will send you DVDs of films - while they are still playing in arthouse theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 21, 2004
There are at least two Nicolas Cage personae. One is the wildly eccentric, Oscar-winning character of Leaving Las Vegas, as well as similar loose cannons in Adaptation, Raising Arizona and Wild at Heart. The other is the action hero of The Rock, Con Air and Gone in 60 Seconds. National Treasure, which opened Friday, combines both of them. Cage plays an eccentric, scholarly treasure hunter who seeks riches possibly buried by our Founding Fathers, who wanted to prevent the booty from falling into British hands.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PHILLIPS and MICHAEL PHILLIPS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 15, 2006
Opening Wednesday, the 59th Festival de Cannes unfurls its red carpet just in time for a planned municipal police strike. It won't be the first strike scheduled around festival time in the French Riviera town famous for being famous, and for being beautiful, and for treating the motion picture arts and sciences like cultural gold. But if the cops walk, will anyone notice? The Cannes film festival - the premier show business pileup of art, commerce, cleavage and Brad Pitt stubble - promises its customary blend of Hollywood and international cinema.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 28, 2004
You love the movies, but have no time for the theater? You crave the trailblazing films of the independent cinema, but none of the local multiplexes shows them? You'd keep up with the latest Hollywood has to offer - if you could do so from the comfort of your sofa? Larry Meistrich is offering a solution. For $19.95 a month, the Manhattan-based entrepreneur and former producer (You Can Count On Me, Sling Blade) will send you DVDs of films - while they are still playing in arthouse theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 21, 2004
There are at least two Nicolas Cage personae. One is the wildly eccentric, Oscar-winning character of Leaving Las Vegas, as well as similar loose cannons in Adaptation, Raising Arizona and Wild at Heart. The other is the action hero of The Rock, Con Air and Gone in 60 Seconds. National Treasure, which opened Friday, combines both of them. Cage plays an eccentric, scholarly treasure hunter who seeks riches possibly buried by our Founding Fathers, who wanted to prevent the booty from falling into British hands.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | March 1, 2004
SANTA MONICA - Lost In Translation found plenty of fans at Saturday's Independent Spirit Awards. Director Sofia Coppola's low-budget tale of spiritually adrift loners establishing an unlikely connection not only was named best feature, but it earned a pair of Spirits for Coppola herself, one for writing, one for directing. And in what may have been the afternoon's most popular choice, star Bill Murray walked off with male lead honors. "I think there's a place for false modesty, so I'll drag it out right now," a smiling Murray, struggling to appear cool and detached, said backstage after receiving his award.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 2004
Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation is really a throwback to the French New Wave -- two actors of immense charm, a confined setting and no plot as such, just a situation. If it had been made in 1963 instead of 2003, it would have starred Jean-Paul Belmondo and Anouk Aimee. It has an airy lightness to it in spite of the fact that it's about two people deeply alienated from their own lives. Truffaut would have loved it. The film stays afloat largely because of the undertow of a teasing sense of sexual tension.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 21, 2003
I don't take `no' easily," says director Sofia Coppola, stopping mid-conversation in a Japanese restaurant. "I just keep asking until someone says `yes.' It's good for directing, but in real life it can be obnoxious." Real life, in this case, is finding someone to bring her a ginger ale. The first time this petite, whispery-voiced director asked for a refreshment, she stopped a restaurant staffer who didn't speak English very well. But no matter. While in Tokyo filming her sophomore effort Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Ghost World's Scarlett Johansson, Coppola worked with a crew that mostly didn't speak English.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
A tale of strangers igniting sparks in a strange land, Lost in Translation amounts to beautiful frustration. The talented young writer-director Sofia Coppola (The Virgin Suicides) conceives her second picture as a Tokyo-set duet between Scarlett Johansson as a neglected newlywed and Bill Murray as an over-the-hill movie star with a moribund marriage back home. But this movie registers like a pop song that enters the mind only in fragments because, as a whole, it lacks the style or substance to be memorable.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | March 1, 2004
SANTA MONICA - Lost In Translation found plenty of fans at Saturday's Independent Spirit Awards. Director Sofia Coppola's low-budget tale of spiritually adrift loners establishing an unlikely connection not only was named best feature, but it earned a pair of Spirits for Coppola herself, one for writing, one for directing. And in what may have been the afternoon's most popular choice, star Bill Murray walked off with male lead honors. "I think there's a place for false modesty, so I'll drag it out right now," a smiling Murray, struggling to appear cool and detached, said backstage after receiving his award.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | April 20, 2005
2004 Francis Coppola "Sofia" Rose ($16). A pretty package isn't reason to buy a mediocre wine, but this is a very well-made rose in a particularly appealing, custom-designed bottle that offsets a relatively high price. A small label lets the vibrant, deep-pink color speak for itself. The wine itself, made from Carneros region pinot noir, is bone-dry and elegant -- with floral aromas and flavors of strawberry, raspberry and cherry. It would make a lovely companion to spicy fried chicken or Southeast Asian dishes.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 12, 2000
Some films succeed by creating exciting, exotic worlds that filmgoers could never visit. Others introduce audiences to characters they will never forget. Then there are those rare movies that entrance us by the emotional tone they capture and sustain. This is the rarefied air in which "The Virgin Suicides" makes its considerable impact. This dreamy tone-poem to the longing and frustration of adolescence doesn't unfold as much as materialize, ethereally, on screen, and it hovers in the imagination long after the lights have gone up. This is not to suggest that Sofia Coppola, who makes her feature directorial debut here, hasn't created some unforgettable characters or, for that matter, failed to orchestrate a gripping story.
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