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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
The corner soda fountain, long a revered neighborhood institution, has returned to South Baltimore.The art of making the chocolate ice cream soda and sundae, the banana split, the malted milk shake, the fountain Coca-Cola, the root beer float and the ice cream snow ball lives on at Earl's Old Malt Shop at Fort Avenue and Jackson Street, due south of the Inner Harbor."
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
Eufrosyne Cavacos Breskow, a retired real estate sales agent and design gallery owner, died of stroke complications March 18 at Dove House in Westminster. The former Roland Park and Mount Vernon resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hampden, she was the daughter of Constantine Cavacos and Pothiti Clentzos Cavacos. Her parents owned and operated a popular drugstore, soda fountain and candy store at Roland Avenue and 36th Street. As a young woman, she worked at the store and its marble-clad soda fountain.
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FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2004
The sisters walk in to the Fort Avenue ice cream shop, white hair freshly curled and firmly in place, looking like twins despite the seven years between them. The man behind the counter knows what to get them without even asking, because they've known him since he was a little boy, and they could tell some stories on him if they wanted. Still, Earl Gallion can't resist teasing them. "I ain't got no chocolate, dumpling," he tells Elizabeth Hall, 79 - knowing what she really wants, what she always wants, is four vanilla milkshakes to go. She'll keep them in the freezer, and dip into them little by little, until she and her 86-year-old sister walk up Jackson Street for more.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Herbert Charles Wagner, a retired pharmacist, died Dec. 21 at Sinai Hospital after suffering a fall a week earlier. He was 82 and lived at the Kensington Park Retirement Community. Born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park, he was the son of Raphael "Ray" Wagner, a pharmacist who owned a business adjacent to the Hippodrome Theatre, and Rose Waller Wagner, a teacher. He attended the Robert E. Lee School, No. 49, and was a 1948 City College graduate. He earned a degree in biology at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2002
If your kids don't know what a real malted milkshake tastes like or if you just need a rush of nostalgia, hurry yourselves to Hampden and check out Hometown Girl's newly installed old-fashioned soda fountain. Owners Chris Swift and Mary Pat Andrea have built a thriving business catering to hometown whims, first with their store Celebrate Baltimore at Harborplace and then at Hometown Girl, an eclectic store on 36th Street. Now they are following in the footsteps of Andrea's grandparents, offering a place to gather for ice-cream sodas, malted milkshakes, Italian sodas and even hot-fudge sundaes.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Thank you to Dan Rodricks for the article about Bernie Weisman and Charlesmead Pharmacy ("Bernie Weisman, the man who never had a bad day in 65 years," Jan. 13). I smiled as I read the article - I had a warm heart and had tears in my eyes too. He was exactly as you said he was, a lovely, caring, giving man. His wife, Marilyn, is an amazing woman, working at the pharmacy, continuing the kindness - the legacy of Bernie. I love being a customer. The entire staff reflects who and what kind of man Bernie was; he created and ran a "one of a kind" old time pharmacy, soda fountain and all. I have missed him, those twinkling eyes and that wonderful smile, his caring.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | March 2, 2012
One afternoon in 1944, a 14-year-old M. Eugene Streett strolled into Boyd and Fulford Drugs on Main Street in downtown Bel Air for a job and he never left. Years later in 1964, M. Eugene, also known as Doc Gene, and his wife, Marytherese, bought the building and the pharmacy, which has become a popular spot for residents to catch up on local news and happenings. “We're 'people' people,” says Maryterese Streett. “There are about eight drug stores between here and Route 1 on Hickory.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
Eufrosyne Cavacos Breskow, a retired real estate sales agent and design gallery owner, died of stroke complications March 18 at Dove House in Westminster. The former Roland Park and Mount Vernon resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hampden, she was the daughter of Constantine Cavacos and Pothiti Clentzos Cavacos. Her parents owned and operated a popular drugstore, soda fountain and candy store at Roland Avenue and 36th Street. As a young woman, she worked at the store and its marble-clad soda fountain.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 28, 1994
Of all the patent medicines and elixirs that Baltimore inventiveness has given to the commercial marketplace, has any been as successful as Noxzema?A long-overdue shrine to the Baltimore-born eczema cure opens this week at the Baltimore Museum of Industry on Key Highway. It is a re-creation of the circa-1911 front window of pharmacist George Bunting's North Avenue drug store where the nationally famous skin cream was initially sold.Bunting, who developed Noxzema about 1911 (the name means "sure knocks eczema")
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | October 22, 1992
For more than a half-century, elbows leaned on it, scoops of vanilla ice cream plopped onto it, sodas dribbled foam on it. For generations, anyone who was anyone wanted to be seen next to it after school or after the movies.Now, the Art Deco-style, green marble soda fountain counter from Albrecht's Pharmacy in Glen Burnie is for sale.It is to be auctioned Saturday in Timonium as part of a nationally advertised auction of country artifacts and advertising memorabilia. Also on the block will be the ceramic-handled dippers and original Coke and Pepsi dispensers from the former neighborhood drug store.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Marie Benick, who lived to be 107 and enjoyed hot fudge sundaes and roller coaster rides, died Friday at her home at Brightview Assisted Living in Towson. Family members said she lived independently until February, when she had a minor stroke that contributed to her death. Born Katherine Marie Overman on May 29, 1906, in Baltimore and raised on Ann Street in Fells Point, she was the daughter of Frederick Overman, a captain on a city fireboat, and Mary Elizabeth Selby, a homemaker.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Thank you to Dan Rodricks for the article about Bernie Weisman and Charlesmead Pharmacy ("Bernie Weisman, the man who never had a bad day in 65 years," Jan. 13). I smiled as I read the article - I had a warm heart and had tears in my eyes too. He was exactly as you said he was, a lovely, caring, giving man. His wife, Marilyn, is an amazing woman, working at the pharmacy, continuing the kindness - the legacy of Bernie. I love being a customer. The entire staff reflects who and what kind of man Bernie was; he created and ran a "one of a kind" old time pharmacy, soda fountain and all. I have missed him, those twinkling eyes and that wonderful smile, his caring.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | March 2, 2012
One afternoon in 1944, a 14-year-old M. Eugene Streett strolled into Boyd and Fulford Drugs on Main Street in downtown Bel Air for a job and he never left. Years later in 1964, M. Eugene, also known as Doc Gene, and his wife, Marytherese, bought the building and the pharmacy, which has become a popular spot for residents to catch up on local news and happenings. “We're 'people' people,” says Maryterese Streett. “There are about eight drug stores between here and Route 1 on Hickory.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | August 11, 2008
For sale: the contents of a 1940s corner South Baltimore soda fountain shop, including marble counter, antique telephone, seating booths, Coca-Cola signs, art deco shelving and the recipe for lemon phosphate. Asking price: $75,000, with the buyer moving all the fixtures. Nearly four years ago, Mark Trunk and his wife, Penny C. George, decided to lease the Olde Malt Shop at East Fort Avenue and Webster Street. During afternoons and evenings, they served milk shakes, snowballs, malts and ice cream cones in one of Baltimore's surviving neighborhood soda fountain settings.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 26, 2008
My friend and neighbor Nick Prevas explained the other evening about how he became historian of the local Greek community. He was 13 years old and at a cousin's funeral. His father, Michael, was greeting the assembled family members and told him to call everyone aunt or uncle. Then, after the wake was over, his father drew him a diagram, a family tree. Nick caught genealogy fever on the spot and that soon morphed into his current opus, House of God ... Gateway to Heaven.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2004
The sisters walk in to the Fort Avenue ice cream shop, white hair freshly curled and firmly in place, looking like twins despite the seven years between them. The man behind the counter knows what to get them without even asking, because they've known him since he was a little boy, and they could tell some stories on him if they wanted. Still, Earl Gallion can't resist teasing them. "I ain't got no chocolate, dumpling," he tells Elizabeth Hall, 79 - knowing what she really wants, what she always wants, is four vanilla milkshakes to go. She'll keep them in the freezer, and dip into them little by little, until she and her 86-year-old sister walk up Jackson Street for more.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | August 11, 2008
For sale: the contents of a 1940s corner South Baltimore soda fountain shop, including marble counter, antique telephone, seating booths, Coca-Cola signs, art deco shelving and the recipe for lemon phosphate. Asking price: $75,000, with the buyer moving all the fixtures. Nearly four years ago, Mark Trunk and his wife, Penny C. George, decided to lease the Olde Malt Shop at East Fort Avenue and Webster Street. During afternoons and evenings, they served milk shakes, snowballs, malts and ice cream cones in one of Baltimore's surviving neighborhood soda fountain settings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 18, 2001
I lived in Philadelphia for several years, but I never quite understood why-heresy coming here-a Philly cheese steak is so much better than any other cheese steak. Aficionados who do care, though, can find the real thing at Federal Hills newest Irish pub, MaGerk's, at 1061 S. Charles St. Owners Paul and John Dolaway are from Philadelphia, and that's where they get the rolls for their popular cheese steaks. Other hot sellers are the chicken cheese steak and the MaGerk: cooked salami, fried onions, white American cheese, tomato and "special sauce" on a kaiser roll.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2003
Sidney R. "Doc" Klavens, who owned and operated a neighborhood drugstore across from Cross Street Market for 40 years, died of heart failure Monday at Sinai Hospital. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 84. A Baltimore native raised on Park Heights Avenue, Mr. Klavens was a 1937 graduate of City College. After his graduation from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy in 1942, he enlisted in the Navy and served as a pharmacist's mate at the Philadelphia Naval Hospital and in Bremerton, Wash.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | August 31, 2002
I OFTEN HEAR people chatting about how they search out the best martini, Manhattan or cosmopolitan, an incredible crab cake or even slaw or french fries. I confess to being a chocolate soda devotee, which I think is even more rare than decent Baltimore peach cake. By chocolate soda I mean the confection served in a classic, tapered soda fountain glass (real glass a must), with a long spoon. Inside is a rhapsody of fountain soda water, a little half-and-half, chocolate syrup and vanilla ice cream.
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